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Old 15.06.2020, 20:42
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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OP asks about fruits, nearly everyone talks veggies.

Question to OP - do you actually want to grow fruit, i.e. peaches, strawberries, apples, cherries, etc, or do you mean vegetables like carrots, peas, green beans, etc?
Actually anything I can eat and grows fairly easily would be awesome.

And thanks for everyone who responded.
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Old 15.06.2020, 20:44
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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With OP being self-proclaimed illiterate you're probably both taking OP too literally. I mean, being agnostic kind of inherently demands lots of leeway with certain terms. Perhaps see the two terms as synonymous for produce.

That said, looks like this is another poster we won't see again.
I wouldn't be too sure about that
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Old 15.06.2020, 21:08
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

Our neighbors above us grow tomatoes on their balcony every summer, and they seem to be doing well. Their balcony faces west and gets sun from about 1 pm to late evening.

As a little experiment, my son and I planted one apple seed from a Gala apple (bought from Migros) a few years ago, in a pot. The plant is now about 75 cm tall.
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Old 15.06.2020, 21:16
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

Balconies can get baking hot so you may need to shield your plants from the sun at the height of summer, then again, some might not get enough sun.
Tomatoes are easy although can get whitefly, raspberries and strawberries can do well but it's likely too late to get anything to eat from them this year. Courgettes are easy but I've never got them to grow. Peas but again might be too late. Figs. A lot of it is trial and error. When it comes to 'erde' you might want to look at something 'bio' and use bio fertilser if necessary. Generally bigger pots are better and the ones with a reservoir in the bottom can be good.
Google it, go on youtube etc, and you'll see what other people are doing.
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Old 16.06.2020, 00:05
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

Slightly different question : Iíve always been used to keeping vegetables in relatively full sun growing up in the US. Iíve had bad luck here on our balcony because itís baking hot all afternoon, from 1pm onward at least and all in concrete. However if all goes well we will soon be buying a house and there is an area in the front that only gets morning sun til about noon but would be a great spot to put in some raised beds. Would this be enough sun? I have the feeling it wouldnít be but my vegetable growing experience, though spanning a little over a decade and many different types of veg, is sadly quite limited to my knowledge of my home climate ...
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Old 16.06.2020, 06:12
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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Slightly different question : Iíve always been used to keeping vegetables in relatively full sun growing up in the US. Iíve had bad luck here on our balcony because itís baking hot all afternoon, from 1pm onward at least and all in concrete. However if all goes well we will soon be buying a house and there is an area in the front that only gets morning sun til about noon but would be a great spot to put in some raised beds. Would this be enough sun? I have the feeling it wouldnít be but my vegetable growing experience, though spanning a little over a decade and many different types of veg, is sadly quite limited to my knowledge of my home climate ...
The most successful vegetable patch we ever have had here only got morning sun. Raised beds are great protection against slugs and the inorganic "organic!" slugbait (iron phosphate) also works really well
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Old 16.06.2020, 09:43
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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The most successful vegetable patch we ever have had here only got morning sun. Raised beds are great protection against slugs and the inorganic "organic!" slugbait (iron phosphate) also works really well
Vegetables grow in full sun in open fields all over southern Europe.

I wonder whether some terraces have a lack of air flow and they just get too hot?

Perhaps there's another problem?
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Old 16.06.2020, 11:05
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

I have a problem with pests on my balcony. Each year. Different kinds of pests. Lots of them. Therefore I try to find the most pest-free plants and I add something new every year.
By now the most pest-free plants are arugula and asiatic lilies (I know, the lilies are not fruits ). Radishes also grow very well. Blueberry bush doesn't have any diseases and pests until now as well (but I bought it in the autumn and it is its first summer on my balcony).
I also grow dwarf french beans, mangold, kale, asiatic greens (they are also pest-free here), basil, dill, coriander, parsley, mint, corn salad and leaf lettuce.
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  #29  
Old 16.06.2020, 11:28
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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Vegetables grow in full sun in open fields all over southern Europe.

I wonder whether some terraces have a lack of air flow and they just get too hot?

Perhaps there's another problem?
The lack of airflow is a good point. Perhaps thatís why Iím having such rotten luck on the balcony. The downstairs neighbors do better but they have a lot more shade than we do in the hot afternoons.

Now that I think of it, in the Seeland I see a lot of the commercial veg production is done under tunnels and not exactly in all day full sun. If this house purchase goes through Iíll have to put out a few pots of veg in different locations next summer to judge where best to plan a more permanent set up.
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Old 16.06.2020, 12:11
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

Before I moved where I live now, I grew (due to lack of cash) lots of things on the balcony to feed my kids and me.
I was able to grow almost anything.

Here are my tips for you from my own experience.

- Because you'll be using pots/flowerboxes you need to check more frequently, that the plants have enough water, than if you'd use high rise beds or plant into the ground.

High rise beds are NOT TO BE USED on a balcony. When it rains. one can quickly weigh over a ton and damage the structure.

- Line the pots about 3cm high with either expanded clay aggregate or shards of broken clay pots, then add the soil. This will help that the plants won't get 'wet feet'

- Because your are quite late in the season, I'd recommend buying seedlings at a garden center, instead of sowing your own (unless it's quick growing stuff like radishes, cress, cutting lettuce)

- Almost anything will grow on a balcony, if tended to.

- Below is the link to the photo album of my FB cookery Blog (alas you need to join, to be able to see the pix), there are many photos illustrating how MY balcony looked with all the plants.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...9815459&type=3


- Tomatoes need to be protected from rain, but need direct sunshine as well
- Cucumbers/peas can use the balcony railing as climbing help
- Use the 'art' of companion planting, this will help the plants to grow as well as keep pests at bay.

For instance, plant together in a large enough pot or in alternating 'rows':

- cucumber and fennel
- Tomatoes and Basil
- beetroot with kohlrabi
- radishes and leeks
- green beans (not runner beans!) and daikon radish
- leafy salad and spring onions

I grew all of that and more in pots on my balcony.

Once you are set up with pots & soil, you can also grow stuff (once the summer yield is harvested [planting/sowing in fall]) that will feed you during winter time, such as spinach, leeks, kale & cabbages, sugar loaf salad.

As for fruits, strawberries grow well and easily on a balcony, google 'strawberry pot'. This pot will allow you to grow a few plants on relatively small space, those pots are also super for planting several kitchen herbs in small space.

The garden centers sell several vegetables and fruits in pint sized form already potted and showing edible stuff , especially for balcony gardening.


HTH

Cheerio, EE
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  #31  
Old 16.06.2020, 13:08
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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The lack of airflow is a good point. Perhaps thatís why Iím having such rotten luck on the balcony. The downstairs neighbors do better but they have a lot more shade than we do in the hot afternoons.

Now that I think of it, in the Seeland I see a lot of the commercial veg production is done under tunnels and not exactly in all day full sun. If this house purchase goes through Iíll have to put out a few pots of veg in different locations next summer to judge where best to plan a more permanent set up.
That's a good idea. I've had plants that just haven't grown as they've had too much sun or not enough.

When I mentioned other things - I meant soil type, amount of watering and so on.

Once I tried to grow Mediterranean herbs in pots. It didn't work. I planted them out and they still didn't thrive so I dug up all the lovely soil and replaced it with grit, rocks and builders rubble with just a small amount of soil.

The plants loved it.

Now we've moved they are in pots again and we haven't got round to making a herb garden.
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Old 16.06.2020, 14:32
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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I wouldn't be too sure about that
One of the occasions I welcome being proven wrong

Generally speaking, I'd say buy seedlings or young plants if you can rather than seeds (radish is one exception that comes to mind). It's a bit more expensive but worth it to get you started (at least until you know what you've gotten yourself into). You're a bit late-ish for this season, you should decide soon what you want to grow. The upside to that is, you may find pots at reduced price.

Usually a vase has no hole at the bottom, that renders them unusable (for now). For the time being only use containers (pots or whatever) with at least one hole at the bottom because surplus water must(!) have a way to flow off. Otherwise you're virtually guaranteed to drown and kill the plant.

You'll probably want to invest a couple hours, perhaps an afternoon, in some YT vids that tell you how to pot/plant and how to water. It's not rocket science at all but nonetheless you'll probably need a tip or three here. Ignore fertilisers for now, fresh soil contains enough nutrients. Focus on keeping the plants alive and let them do their thing.

A store-bought seedling/plant comes with a stick/label in the pot that contains a brief description of its needs. Basically everything you can buy in the big shops is suitable for the climate around here. The shop personnel is usually knowledgable enough to advise; at my local Landi at least two are qualified gardeners (no idea how representative that is).
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Old 16.06.2020, 14:46
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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The lack of airflow is a good point. Perhaps that’s why I’m having such rotten luck on the balcony. The downstairs neighbors do better but they have a lot more shade than we do in the hot afternoons.
A balcony pot in the blazing sun is likely to get quite warm, hot even. The roots won't like that, especially later in the afternoon when the water from the morning may have evaporated already.

This would apply, to construct an example, to the typical geranium container that is hung outside the balcony wall, were it not for the shade provide by the densely-grown plants themselves. The relatively bright cement-like containers that are commonly used help as well as they reflect more than darker ones.

Perhaps try to keep the pots shaded? (provided you don't already)
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Old 18.06.2020, 16:18
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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Yeah you say this. I pointed out to my girlfriend today that the vegetable patch that we had made in the garden at great expense* doesnĎt seem to be yielding many vegetables, only to be told that she hadnĎt banked on it getting so much sun and will need plants around it to give the vegetables some shade. The weeds are pretty epic though.

*about the cost of 20 years fruit and veg.
That would be too little water, not too much sun. Put down mulch so the water doesn't evaporate too quickly.
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Old 19.06.2020, 19:34
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

I tried to grow things on my balcony this year for the first time ever, so also pretty illiterate, but I've had success so far with radishes (on northeast facing) and spinach (on southwest facing) - they sprouted quickly and i've even harvested some already!
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Old 21.06.2020, 16:41
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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A balcony pot in the blazing sun is likely to get quite warm, hot even. The roots won't like that, especially later in the afternoon when the water from the morning may have evaporated already.

Perhaps try to keep the pots shaded? (provided you don't already)

I don't think it is a necessitiy to go to big lenghts when one wants to grow edibles on a balcony in pots.

At my old home, my balcony was exposed to full sun from just before midday onwards to evening, no real shade for the plants, sometimes blazing hot and exposed to draughty winds it was too. I grew our veggies in plastic pots and it went very well.

One just has to consider to water the plants twice a day, give plant feed on shady or even rainy days. I did this balcony gardening for a great number of years and apart from one or the other herb (coriander/dill) I didn't have any problems
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Old 20.07.2020, 13:26
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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High rise beds are NOT TO BE USED on a balcony. When it rains. one can quickly weigh over a ton and damage the structure.
Hi East Enders,

By high rise beds, do you mean one of these? https://www.doitgarden.ch/fr/p/65702...our-plante-fsc

I've currently got one on my balcony and wondering if I should get worried....I didn't see anything in my lease about it, and it's laying against the building so I don't think it gets too wet when it rains (plus we made holes at the bottom so water can flow out). We figure that the bed + soil weighs in at about 85kg or so, about the weight of an adult man...could it really pose an issue? It is an old building though..

If anyone has any knowledge on this would be glad to hear it.
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Old 21.07.2020, 12:31
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Re: What kind of vegetable plants grow in Switzerland?

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Hi East Enders,

By high rise beds, do you mean one of these? https://www.doitgarden.ch/fr/p/65702...our-plante-fsc

I've currently got one on my balcony and wondering if I should get worried....I didn't see anything in my lease about it, and it's laying against the building so I don't think it gets too wet when it rains (plus we made holes at the bottom so water can flow out). We figure that the bed + soil weighs in at about 85kg or so, about the weight of an adult man...could it really pose an issue? It is an old building though..

If anyone has any knowledge on this would be glad to hear it.


You should be safe.

Your frame is 15kg and it can be filled with 90liters of soil
A regular 40 liter bag of soil, depending on the mix weighs between approx. 10-18 kilo. you're watering your plants regularly, 1liter of water is ~1kg too so summasummarum , I think you are safe-

But even so, it is still better to distribute the stationary weight evenly over the balcony. Perhaps your letting agency, or if you are the owner the original plans to the house, can tell you the average weight the balcony can carry.
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