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  #21  
Old 01.07.2021, 15:29
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Re: Coins problems

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Genuine question, speaking as a Brit… what pre-decimalisation names are still in use? I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone referring to shillings or crowns except with direct reference to the past, e.g., “I used to get half a shilling a week pocket money when I was a child in the 50s”. I’ve certainly no idea what a shilling is in “modern” money.
Is tuppence considered an outdated term or just an easier way to say 2 pence?
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  #22  
Old 01.07.2021, 15:57
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Re: Coins problems

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Is tuppence considered an outdated term or just an easier way to say 2 pence?
I’m not sure but I wouldn’t consider that in common usage for money either? I’d say 2p myself but not a lot costs 2p any more.
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  #23  
Old 01.07.2021, 16:11
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Re: Coins problems

At least from my relatives / acquaintances I hear tuppence, (two-)bob, quid.
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Old 01.07.2021, 16:16
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Re: Coins problems

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Genuine question, speaking as a Brit… what pre-decimalisation names are still in use? I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone referring to shillings or crowns except with direct reference to the past, e.g., “I used to get half a shilling a week pocket money when I was a child in the 50s”. I’ve certainly no idea what a shilling is in “modern” money.
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Is tuppence considered an outdated term or just an easier way to say 2 pence?
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I’m not sure but I wouldn’t consider that in common usage for money either? I’d say 2p myself but not a lot costs 2p any more.
Both of my sons (who've spent their entire lives in Switzerland) know and use correctly quid, shilling, penny, tuppence and threepence (pronounced thruppence), and tanner.
They also understand and when relevant use feet and inches.... including fractions thereof such as 1/16".
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Old 01.07.2021, 16:17
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Re: Coins problems

I'm old enough to remember using 'tuppence' as a nice word for a lady part.
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  #26  
Old 01.07.2021, 16:27
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Re: Coins problems

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Both of my sons (who've spent their entire lives in Switzerland) know and use correctly quid, shilling, penny, tuppence and threepence (pronounced thruppence), and tanner.
They also understand and when relevant use feet and inches.... including fractions thereof such as 1/16".
That's the funny part of working with cars and bikes, some times you need a metric wrench/key, other times the 3/8". The funny thing is having a metric socket coupled to a 1/2" ratchet.
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Old 01.07.2021, 16:37
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Re: Coins problems

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Both of my sons (who've spent their entire lives in Switzerland) know and use correctly quid, shilling, penny, tuppence and threepence (pronounced thruppence), and tanner.
They also understand and when relevant use feet and inches.... including fractions thereof such as 1/16".
I grew up in the UK. Quid is slang for a pound, there’s nothing specifically pre-decimalisation about it - we still have pounds. Ditto pennies. I know what tuppence and threepence are but I can’t see any use for them when describing money counting today. However none of these are really what I am thinking of from this description “a large part of the British population still uses the pre-decimalisation names” - I’ve basically no idea which pre-decimalisation terms people are supposedly using for modern coins. I was genuinely interested to know - is it a regional thing?

I’ve no idea what a tanner is.
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Old 01.07.2021, 16:45
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Re: Coins problems

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Genuine question, speaking as a Brit… what pre-decimalisation names are still in use? I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone referring to shillings or crowns except with direct reference to the past, e.g., “I used to get half a shilling a week pocket money when I was a child in the 50s”. I’ve certainly no idea what a shilling is in “modern” money.
Maybe I'm old fashioned but I do definitely recall people saying "a bob" for a shilling which is the same as 5p.

Like in Switzerland sometimes you will sometimes hear "e stutz" for a 1 CHF coin or "batzen" for the 20 Rp coin etc.
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  #29  
Old 01.07.2021, 16:47
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Re: Coins problems

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I grew up in the UK. Quid is slang for a pound, there’s nothing specifically pre-decimalisation about it - we still have pounds. Ditto pennies. I know what tuppence and threepence are but I can’t see any use for them when describing money counting today. However none of these are really what I am thinking of from this description “a large part of the British population still uses the pre-decimalisation names” - I’ve basically no idea which pre-decimalisation terms people are supposedly using for modern coins. I was genuinely interested to know - is it a regional thing?

I’ve no idea what a tanner is.
By definition there's nothing specifically pre-decimalisation about any of them, since we are now after that point. Quid was definitely a pre-decimalisation usage.

Similarly there is no point to using them, they are slang.

Tanner was a sixpence, now 2.5p so no coin matches it.

In terms of new money:

Tuppence = 2p
Bob = one shilling = 5p
Two bob = two shillings = 10p
Quid = £1
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  #30  
Old 01.07.2021, 16:49
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Re: Coins problems

You’ve got phrases like “that’s got to have cost a few bob” that are still in common usage and I confess to have been unaware of the history of “bob”. But I’d be genuinely lost if anyone used “bob” to describe a specific coin or amount of money.
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  #31  
Old 01.07.2021, 16:49
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Re: Coins problems

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That's the funny part of working with cars and bikes, some times you need a metric wrench/key, other times the 3/8". The funny thing is having a metric socket coupled to a 1/2" ratchet.
To this day, garden hoses are sold in metric lengths but imperial diameters.

So you can buy a 25m long 3/4 inch hose for example. Even in Germany from a German manufacturer.
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Old 01.07.2021, 16:54
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Re: Coins problems

Tuppence = 2p => there is still a 2p coin, or was last I checked.
Bob = one shilling = 5p => does anyone say it cost me 2 bob for something that cost 10p?
Two bob = two shillings = 10p => as above
Quid = £1 => we still have pounds, so I don’t see this as archaic usage

The bit I’m really questioning is people actually using them when describing modern money in a specific rather than abstract way. I don’t know anyone who says “have you got a spare tuppence” or “have you got two bob for the parking meter”.
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  #33  
Old 01.07.2021, 16:54
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Re: Coins problems

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To this day, garden hoses are sold in metric lengths but imperial diameters.

So you can buy a 25m long 3/4 inch hose for example. Even in Germany from a German manufacturer.
Same with car tyres - wheel diameter in inches, tyre width in mm.
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  #34  
Old 01.07.2021, 16:55
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Re: Coins problems

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Tuppence = 2p => there is still a 2p coin, or was last I checked.
Bob = one shilling = 5p => does anyone say it cost me 2 bob for something that cost 10p?
Two bob = two shillings = 10p => as above
Quid = £1 => we still have pounds, so I don’t see this as archaic usage

The bit I’m really questioning is people actually using them when describing modern money in a specific rather than abstract way. I don’t know anyone who says “have you got a spare tuppence” or “have you got two bob for the parking meter”.
I don't understand your point - you said you don't know anyone who uses these terms already. Several other people have said they do - are you doubting us, or what point are you trying to make?
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Old 01.07.2021, 16:56
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Re: Coins problems

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By definition there's nothing specifically pre-decimalisation about any of them, since we are now after that point. Quid was definitely a pre-decimalisation usage.

In terms of new money:

Tuppence = 2p
Bob = one shilling = 5p
Two bob = two shillings = 10p
Quid = £1
Today in Ireland quid is used for Euros now, it used to be used for the Punt as well.
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Old 01.07.2021, 17:08
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Re: Coins problems

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I don't understand your point - you said you don't know anyone who uses these terms already. Several other people have said they do - are you doubting us, or what point are you trying to make?
I only saw amogles saying “Maybe I'm old fashioned but I do definitely recall people saying "a bob" for a shilling which is the same as 5p.” which seemed to refer to a past time rather than be confirmation of continued common usage. All the other replies seemed to be explaining what the terms are, which wasn’t my question.

I wasn’t trying to make any point. I’m just interested in language and use of language. I was born in the UK, grew up in the UK, lived more than 30 years in the UK. Yet I’m not familiar with anyone saying (for example) “have you got two bob for the parking meter” in current times or even 20 years ago. I’d say 10p and so would my parents and grandparents. Use of these old terms in a modern financial context is a new one on me. I intended no criticism, I was just wondering if I was unusual in my unfamiliarity with this usage, or whether it’s something common to certain regions but not others.
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Old 01.07.2021, 17:18
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Re: Coins problems

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That's the funny part of working with cars and bikes, some times you need a metric wrench/key, other times the 3/8". The funny thing is having a metric socket coupled to a 1/2" ratchet.
Sons own and maintain several classic minis, and also have quite a few sets of imperial tools..... absolutely vital if a swiss army knife doesn't quite cut the mustard!
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  #38  
Old 01.07.2021, 17:24
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Re: Coins problems

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I only saw amogles saying “Maybe I'm old fashioned but I do definitely recall people saying "a bob" for a shilling which is the same as 5p.” which seemed to refer to a past time rather than be confirmation of continued common usage. All the other replies seemed to be explaining what the terms are, which wasn’t my question.

I wasn’t trying to make any point. I’m just interested in language and use of language. I was born in the UK, grew up in the UK, lived more than 30 years in the UK. Yet I’m not familiar with anyone saying (for example) “have you got two bob for the parking meter” in current times or even 20 years ago. I’d say 10p and so would my parents and grandparents. Use of these old terms in a modern financial context is a new one on me. I intended no criticism, I was just wondering if I was unusual in my unfamiliarity with this usage, or whether it’s something common to certain regions but not others.
I left the UK in my early twenties (Oxford born and bred), but visit family several times a year (in normal times that is). None of the words and expressions mentioned are that unusual to hear.... perhaps you've just not noticed?
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Old 01.07.2021, 21:20
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Re: Coins problems

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I left the UK in my early twenties (Oxford born and bred), but visit family several times a year (in normal times that is). None of the words and expressions mentioned are that unusual to hear.... perhaps you've just not noticed?
I’m familiar with the use of “bob” in an abstract context and agree this is common. For example “that new car must have cost him a bob or two”. What I’m not familiar with is it’s use to identify a specific sum of money, and in fact I didn’t know it was slang for shilling or that the shilling equivalent in modern money is 5p. So I’d most definitely notice if someone asked me if they could borrow ten bob - because until this thread I’d not have known what it meant. I can’t think of an example of shilling being in modern usage unless referring to the Kenyan one.

“Bob” is actually the only term mentioned in this thread that both refers to exclusively pre-decimal currency and is in *any* form of common usage today per my experience. I’m very happy to be corrected but I’d really like to hear examples for interests sake - apart from the many variants on my “bob” example above, are these other uses phrases I’ve never heard of or would I remember them if I heard them? Do lots of other people go around using bob as a precise measure of currency and get everyone understanding them?

The terms penny and quid are in common usage but I don’t count these as pre-decimal terms because they refer to coins/denominations that still exist post-decimalisation today, so of course people still use the words.

I don’t hear tuppence or threepence in a modern usage context. I’d obviously know what they meant and wouldn’t be confused if someone asked me for tuppence because though the use is a bit archaic we still have a 2p coin. I’d never use the word myself though. Threepence is a bit weirder because there’s no longer a coin. So I’d probably not notice the former but I think I would the latter, it would seem really unusual. Really though, I’d only expect to hear these terms used in a historical context.
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  #40  
Old 01.07.2021, 22:09
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Re: Coins problems

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To this day, garden hoses are sold in metric lengths but imperial diameters.
Got a recipe for "pound cake"?

Tom
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