Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Living in Switzerland > Daily life  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 02.07.2021, 04:05
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,882
Groaned at 89 Times in 70 Posts
Thanked 11,900 Times in 4,836 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
Both of my sons (who've spent their entire lives in Switzerland) know and use correctly quid, shilling, penny, tuppence and threepence (pronounced thruppence), and tanner.
They also understand and when relevant use feet and inches.... including fractions thereof such as 1/16".
I wonder, since you left the UK in your early 20s, and your sons own and maintain several classic Minis... about current usage. If your sons were to visit the UK, and ask someone to lend them four shillings, thruppence or five tanner(s), do you think that their UK contemporaries would know what they meant?

I can't think of anyone I know who grew up in the UK, who is under about 40, who would even use "quid" themselves, although of course they know what it means when someone else does, and they might use "bob" but only in the many phrases in this thread. Shilling? Thruppence? Tanner? I don't think they would have those in their active vocabulary at all.

One possibility is that this is a question of the generations. Or could this perhaps be regional?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank doropfiz for this useful post:
  #42  
Old 02.07.2021, 08:52
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Basel
Posts: 67
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 70 Times in 35 Posts
gaemsbock has no particular reputation at present
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
Or could this perhaps be regional?
This is exactly what I am wondering. I’m under 40 and from London - “bob” seems a bit old-fashioned to me and I would never use it, but I accept it’s in fairly common usage (in parts of the country?) in the abstract sense when used to convey the idea of something being expensive. I’ve just checked with my brother and he also has no idea what a bob is in monetary terms.

On the other hand “quid” is for me much more common, and whilst my natural use of language doesn’t include lots of slang, I would use “quid” in certain contexts and I would expect to hear it daily when living/working in London.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank gaemsbock for this useful post:
  #43  
Old 02.07.2021, 09:44
newtoswitz's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Rapperswil
Posts: 3,722
Groaned at 75 Times in 70 Posts
Thanked 4,507 Times in 2,058 Posts
newtoswitz has a reputation beyond reputenewtoswitz has a reputation beyond reputenewtoswitz has a reputation beyond reputenewtoswitz has a reputation beyond reputenewtoswitz has a reputation beyond reputenewtoswitz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
This is exactly what I am wondering. I’m under 40 and from London - “bob” seems a bit old-fashioned to me and I would never use it, but I accept it’s in fairly common usage (in parts of the country?) in the abstract sense when used to convey the idea of something being expensive. I’ve just checked with my brother and he also has no idea what a bob is in monetary terms.

On the other hand “quid” is for me much more common, and whilst my natural use of language doesn’t include lots of slang, I would use “quid” in certain contexts and I would expect to hear it daily when living/working in London.


You asked what pre-decimalisation words were still in use, i.e. from just over 50 years ago. Obviously they're going to seem old-fashioned.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank newtoswitz for this useful post:
  #44  
Old 02.07.2021, 09:52
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Basel
Posts: 67
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 70 Times in 35 Posts
gaemsbock has no particular reputation at present
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post


You asked what pre-decimalisation words were still in use, i.e. from just over 50 years ago. Obviously they're going to seem old-fashioned.
Well, you specifically referred to their usage for coins and notes, which is what surprised me because I’m not familiar with anyone referring to a “bob” when talking about a 5p coin.

Quote:
View Post
And as for names, a large part of the British population still uses the pre-decimalisation names, others use local names for coins and various sizes of notes.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 02.07.2021, 15:01
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,882
Groaned at 89 Times in 70 Posts
Thanked 11,900 Times in 4,836 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post


You asked what pre-decimalisation words were still in use, i.e. from just over 50 years ago. Obviously they're going to seem old-fashioned.
I'm surprised such words are still in use, somewhere.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 02.07.2021, 18:34
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: SG
Posts: 8,926
Groaned at 465 Times in 348 Posts
Thanked 11,841 Times in 6,165 Posts
Urs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
I'm surprised such words are still in use, somewhere.
You ain't seen nothing yet

I find it quite astounding how some of these terms below remained in use for centuries.
Quote:
View Post
Like in Switzerland sometimes you will sometimes hear "e stutz" for a 1 CHF coin or "batzen" for the 20 Rp coin etc.
I think the amount of a Batzen today depends on the situation and circumstances. Children may be given a "Batze" (i.e. a coin or three) for candy or to put in their piggybank. Also, there's the GöttiBatzen or GottiBatzen, a monetary gift by the godfather/mother, often a double or triple digit amount geared to the agreed upon purpose (thus also to the receiving child's age). The term itself is a remnant of the Cantonal Bernese money that was replaced by the introduction of the Swiss Franc in 1850.

That said, you may be interested in the history and origin of the "Liber" part of "ZweiLiber" (2 CHF coin) and "FünfLiber" (5 CHF coin) as they go back centuries. In the (cantonal) Bernese monetary system, a French 5-Francs coin was worth 5 Bernese Pound. Pound translates to livre in French, and with only a little vowel-shifting you get today's "-Liber".

The introduction of the 6th Swiss notes series in 1976 caused a few slang terms of their own. A 1000 note was called Ameise (ant) due the picture on its back, and the 100 note was called Borromini due to the pictured person. There were probably more terms but it's quite a while since and I'm not really into this stuff anyway.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Urs Max for this useful post:
  #47  
Old 02.07.2021, 18:53
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,592
Groaned at 284 Times in 232 Posts
Thanked 24,727 Times in 10,449 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
You ain't seen nothing yet

I find it quite astounding how some of these terms below remained in use for centuries.
I think the amount of a Batzen today depends on the situation and circumstances. Children may be given a "Batze" (i.e. a coin or three) for candy or to put in their piggybank. Also, there's the GöttiBatzen or GottiBatzen, a monetary gift by the godfather/mother, often a double or triple digit amount geared to the agreed upon purpose (thus also to the receiving child's age). The term itself is a remnant of the Cantonal Bernese money that was replaced by the introduction of the Swiss Franc in 1850.

That said, you may be interested in the history and origin of the "Liber" part of "ZweiLiber" (2 CHF coin) and "FünfLiber" (5 CHF coin) as they go back centuries. In the (cantonal) Bernese monetary system, a French 5-Francs coin was worth 5 Bernese Pound. Pound translates to livre in French, and with only a little vowel-shifting you get today's "-Liber".

The introduction of the 6th Swiss notes series in 1976 caused a few slang terms of their own. A 1000 note was called Ameise (ant) due the picture on its back, and the 100 note was called Borromini due to the pictured person. There were probably more terms but it's quite a while since and I'm not really into this stuff anyway.
Interesting, thanks for those links.

I am actually most familiar with the term Batzen being used to describe a tip or a rounding up of a payment.

I thought the 1,2 and 5 Franc coins owed their origins to the Latin Monetary Union, probably making Switzerland the only country to use coinage in direct continuity of that.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 03.07.2021, 06:04
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: SG
Posts: 8,926
Groaned at 465 Times in 348 Posts
Thanked 11,841 Times in 6,165 Posts
Urs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond reputeUrs Max has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
Interesting, thanks for those links.

I am actually most familiar with the term Batzen being used to describe a tip or a rounding up of a payment.

I thought the 1,2 and 5 Franc coins owed their origins to the Latin Monetary Union, probably making Switzerland the only country to use coinage in direct continuity of that.
I can only think of "Trinkgeld" as a term for a tip. But of course regional usage may vary.

The Swiss Franc was introduced in 1850, whereas the LMU was founded in the mid-1860ies, it lasted until somewhat after WW1. There was quite a bit of back-and-forth between 1798 and 1850, including the introduction of an earlier Franken for a few years. Certainly France had significant influence during those years already, the similarity between "Franken" and "franc" for instance can't be mere coincidence. The LMU switched from bimetal standard to gold-only at some point. In that sense only the gold coins have the potential to meet your guess, and I think they do as they're still legal tender and were minted while CH was bound by the LMU standards.

The Wiki page on the Batzen contains some pictures that may be of interest in this context as some remind of some contemporary coins, demonstrating the continuity/longevity of some things. It may be worth your while to read the pages on the other coins including 1 and 2 Rappen, and on the Helvetia and Vreneli gold coins (which met the LMU requirements).

It may also be of interest that the 1, 2, and 5 Franken coins were made of silver (probably a remnant of the original LMU bimetal requirements) until about 1967. When the worldwide silver market was cornered by the Texan Hunt brothers (in the later '70ies) their metal value made it worth melting them to extract the silver. That's why you no longer find the older coins in free circulation.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 03.07.2021, 07:51
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Nyon
Posts: 4,853
Groaned at 244 Times in 178 Posts
Thanked 6,586 Times in 3,103 Posts
bowlie has a reputation beyond reputebowlie has a reputation beyond reputebowlie has a reputation beyond reputebowlie has a reputation beyond reputebowlie has a reputation beyond reputebowlie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

And then there was the guinea, 21 schillings!
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 04.07.2021, 10:35
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Schaffhausen
Posts: 30
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 16 Times in 10 Posts
RoseGlow has no particular reputation at present
Re: Coins problems

You can order them the rolls of coins at the bank. But I asked some time ago but I gave up because they told me that for individuals they can "order it for a fee" and I had to come back another day.
They seem to get them for shops and business, but at least in my local branch they don't have "enough" to give to individuals.

What I'm doing is to get my change at carwash. Usually 10 at a time.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank RoseGlow for this useful post:
  #51  
Old 04.07.2021, 11:11
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,592
Groaned at 284 Times in 232 Posts
Thanked 24,727 Times in 10,449 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Moving away from coins and going to units in general there is a lot of pre decimal stuff that still survives, even in official and technical documentation .

Calorific value of fuel for example often still gets expressed in BTU , even in official documents and reports without a MJ conversion even being offered . That is one of my pet peeves . And then we have lots of strange hybrid units that defy logic . What’s a kWh ? Convert it to MJ please . Hours are not decimal and are not SI and should not be used in scientific notation .

Move on to cars and a lot of people still think in hp rather than kW (again) even in continental Europe .

Some of this stuff may be imposed or necessitated by trade with the USA , for example shipping containers come in lengths of 10, 20 and 40 foot sizes and this means standard packages need to be clear fractions of that to fill the space optimally . Shipping containers are actually very wasteful because they are narrower than train cars and so don’t hold as much . The Europeans have standard palette sizes that come in metric and have to some extent bought metrifcation to European stuff that goes on palettes (especially building materials) but they remain incompatible to shipping containers without further space being wasted .
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 04.07.2021, 11:45
Belgianmum's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Neuchâtel
Posts: 13,055
Groaned at 227 Times in 192 Posts
Thanked 21,547 Times in 8,832 Posts
Belgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post

I can't think of anyone I know who grew up in the UK, who is under about 40, who would even use "quid" themselves, although of course they know what it means when someone else does, and they might use "bob" but only in the many phrases in this thread. Shilling? Thruppence? Tanner? I don't think they would have those in their active vocabulary at all.

One possibility is that this is a question of the generations. Or could this perhaps be regional?
I don’t know anyone in the UK amongst my friends and family of all generations who doesn’t use the term ‘quid’. It really is a widely used term in the uk and across all regions.

All of them would also know the meaning of the other terms but they’re not as commonly used.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Belgianmum for this useful post:
  #53  
Old 04.07.2021, 12:49
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Frick, Aargau
Posts: 2,509
Groaned at 50 Times in 44 Posts
Thanked 3,390 Times in 1,633 Posts
HickvonFrick has a reputation beyond reputeHickvonFrick has a reputation beyond reputeHickvonFrick has a reputation beyond reputeHickvonFrick has a reputation beyond reputeHickvonFrick has a reputation beyond reputeHickvonFrick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
I don’t know anyone in the UK amongst my friends and family of all generations who doesn’t use the term ‘quid’. It really is a widely used term in the uk and across all regions.

All of them would also know the meaning of the other terms but they’re not as commonly used.
I'm from the north east and in my early 30s.

I know thruppence is "three pence" in pre decimalisation terms. I know "shilling" was a subdivision of a pound but not totally sure about it's value. 12p? and 20 shillings to the old pound? Or 20p and 12 shillings to the pound? I think 240p to the old pound?

Tanner - no idea unless it's a corruption of tenner. Never heard of it before.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 04.07.2021, 13:03
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,592
Groaned at 284 Times in 232 Posts
Thanked 24,727 Times in 10,449 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
I'm from the north east and in my early 30s.

I know thruppence is "three pence" in pre decimalisation terms. I know "shilling" was a subdivision of a pound but not totally sure about it's value. 12p? and 20 shillings to the old pound? Or 20p and 12 shillings to the pound? I think 240p to the old pound?

Tanner - no idea unless it's a corruption of tenner. Never heard of it before.
Yeah, almost.

The old penny was not a p but a d.

So it was 12d to a shilling and 20 shillings to a pound, making as you say, the pound 240d

That would make the shilling 5p in new money. When decimilaization came in they thus left the shilling coins in use and made the new 5p coins the exact same shape, weight and material and so shillings continued to be accepted as 5p. You could find pre decimalization shilling coins, some even with the faces of earlier monarchs, in use right on until the late 1980s when the old 5p was phased out and replaced by a new smaller coin which is still used to this day. Ditto for the 10p / 2 shilling which was also called the florin in pre-decimalization times, although this name seems to have dropped out of usage a long time ago.

There never was a 10 shilling coin as a predecessor to the 50p coin. Instead there was a 10 shilling banknote which was phased out at decimalization.

The shilling as a currency goes back to anglo saxon times, with king Offa of Mercia having introduced it in the early 800s. Even then it was worth 12 pennies and one twentieth of a gold pound (both of which were coins of Roman origin). Offa made the shilling nominally equivalent to a similar coin with a similar name that had been introduced by Charlemaigne some years previously. As such the shilling was one of the oldest units of coinage to have survived in continuous usage until modern times.

Last edited by amogles; 04.07.2021 at 13:20.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank amogles for this useful post:
  #55  
Old 04.07.2021, 13:06
Belgianmum's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Neuchâtel
Posts: 13,055
Groaned at 227 Times in 192 Posts
Thanked 21,547 Times in 8,832 Posts
Belgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Coins problems

Quote:
View Post
Tanner - no idea unless it's a corruption of tenner. Never heard of it before.
A tanner was a sixpence. That’s the one I would least expect younger people to know.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Belgianmum for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Get rid of the Coins sailorimc Finance/banking/taxation 25 05.05.2021 12:39
What does one do with the 5¢ (coins)? Karhu Daily life 20 16.12.2015 20:02
Quit my job, problems leaving my house and final salary not paid and other problems allurbasez Employment 17 10.05.2014 18:57
Does anybody know what these coins are? Desert Rat Daily life 27 10.02.2013 14:10
Coins!!! What to do with them?? MariMari Finance/banking/taxation 12 10.03.2012 23:59


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 19:53.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0