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  #21  
Old 21.06.2022, 16:54
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Fair beans, but your child is also their own person and they are not you. Burdening another human with an inconvenient or unnecessarily long name in order to fulfill your own desires isn't really being respectful to them. Trust me, having more names than what is considered normal is not fun.
What is normal?
I may have a biased view, but a lot of the swiss people I know have two family names, two first names ... they may not use them, but they have them. A lot like 3/5 of my working team, so it is hardly uncommon. Nowadays, probably 30 years ago was different.
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  #22  
Old 21.06.2022, 18:09
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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My Swiss in-laws are not happy about it as they say Iím breaking the family tradition and my baby is the last one who could give continuation to the family Nachname.

So I am under pressure to take this decision.
Remember: Your family traditions are equally important, and hold equal value.

--

This is a decision that should be made by you and your husband/partner, and you two alone. Punkt Fertig. The inlaws have no say in it.

Don't let them pressure you. If they start up, simply thank them for sharing their thoughts. The then pointedly change the subject.

Your husband/partner must back you up to let his parents know that pressuring you is not acceptible. If he isn't doing that, a heart-to-heart is in order. He should have already told his parents in no uncertain terms to back off, that the decision belongs to you two alone.

This will be good practice for child rearing - there will be plenty of times when, even if you are still debating amongst yourselves, you two will need to be a united front when others try to stick their oars in.

Do what feels right for you and your husband - and most importantly for your child.

Congratulations on the baby, and wishing you much joy.
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  #23  
Old 21.06.2022, 19:42
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Having a hyphenated surname is hardly a drama! Many Swiss had this before they changed the rules recently.
We are not talking about the past, were are talking about the next 80 years...
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  #24  
Old 21.06.2022, 20:56
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

Our baby was born in Switzerland and we registered him as British first to ensure we can have the name we want. Who knew there was surname law?! We do now!

So we gave our baby only one given name and his surname is made up of the male version of my girl friends name (her name without the 'ova') and my surname. In that order. Not hyphenated, 2 word.

We choose my surname as his last last name we just felt that was correct.

And as for being the odd one out or any issues. It is our family, our decision and everyone else will just have to deal with it. I mean he hasnt been made Swiss by birth so why should we conform to their rules on names? And 25% of the country being foreign, I expect there will be many different name variations.

Kids dont usually pick on other kids for their names. They only know like 30 people in the world so in there small world every 30th person has a name like this
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  #25  
Old 21.06.2022, 22:54
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

I see these possible solution.

1. Have limping naming ("hinkende NamensfŁhrung"). Means the child's British name and the child's Swiss name are different.
2. Hope the Swiss accept your naming and avoid 1
3. Have your surname as an additional first name. As long as that sound reasonable.
4. Officially change your surname to "MOM’ surname DAD’s surname" or "DAD’s and MOM’s surname" and pass that down to the child.

Last edited by aSwissInTheUS; 21.06.2022 at 23:05.
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  #26  
Old 21.06.2022, 23:04
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Having a hyphenated surname is hardly a drama! Many Swiss had this before they changed the rules recently.
What rule change, when did that happen?

Hyphenated names are as possible as they were in the past. AFAIK nothing has changed regarding hyphenated names in the last 24 months . But importantly it was never for children and for spouses only.

Edit: Checked the law. Hyphenated names are still a thing
https://www.fedlex.admin.ch/eli/cc/2002/441/de#art_2

See also: https://www.englishforum.ch/daily-li...rectories.html
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  #27  
Old 22.06.2022, 00:08
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Naming can be problematic and provoke a surprising range of emotions.

We have 3 children.

Number 1 from my wife's first marriage has the family name of her first husband. Let's call him Smith. My wife kept her married name after they divorced, as she did not want to have a different name (and nationality) to her daughter.

We married in 2013 and my wife added my family name to her former married name and become Smith-Jones.

Number 2, born in 2008, naturalised in CH in 2019, is a Smith-Jones.

Number 3, born in 2019 in Switzerland, is also Smith-Jones.

When we registered the birth of Number 3 in Geneva, my wife was told by the Geneva registration office that she needed proof from her home country (Poland) that she had the right to use the name Smith-Jones. Even though it's on our marriage certificate, my wife's permit, and daughter number 2's Swiss passport.

The following day we spoke to a different person in the Geneva registration office who registered the name without any concerns.

Having a double surname bothers some dinosaurs.

I think they're just fine as a way of connecting families and names in a world where things are not always straightforward.
Wait, do I understand this correctly? Your children carry the name of your wife's ex?
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  #28  
Old 22.06.2022, 07:45
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

We gave our daughter a typical "Swiss" middle name, and our son a "Family" middle name.

Maybe you can compromise and offer to do the same? Most official documents ask for a first and last name only, if you have a middle one... well its your secret.

My brother gave his kids two middle names!
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  #29  
Old 22.06.2022, 09:23
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Baby is born in England but will grow up in Switzerland

I wish to name my baby the following:
NAME + MOMí surname DADís surname (or DADís and MOMís surname)

My Swiss in-laws are not happy about it as they say Iím breaking the family tradition and my baby is the last one who could give continuation to the family Nachname. Also the law in Switzerland do not authorise double barrel names, so it sounds ďoddĒ in their opinion.
I have strong views regarding the matter and find it extremely upseting if my baby wonít carry my surname also (I find taking the fatherís surname only, patriarcal and outdated).
So I am under pressure to take this decision.
I would like to know:

1. Will my child be the odd one out living in Switzerland with two surnames or a hyphenated surname?
2. Does the order of the surname matter? In your opinion which one stands more importantly?
(My understanding is that in England on daily life it would be the Last Surname, as people would understand it to be THE surname (if not hyphenated).
3. Is there anything else, you think I should consider?
So you are talking about naming the baby:

Baby Smith-Schmidt or
Baby Schmidt-Smith or
Baby Smith Schmidt etc.

Personally, I think surname without hyphen might be a bit confusing, but it is your baby so you should decide.

In the UK there is considerable flexibilty on the name, so choose whatever name you want including hyphenated and once you have the name in the UK, provide the birth certificate/passport to the Swiss authorities who would then accept the name, even if it would not normally be allowed. If child is already born, you can also change the name easily in the UK. Some guy even changed his name to Jellyfish McSaveloy another changed his name to a very long one incorporating all the names of his favourite football team players.
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Old 22.06.2022, 09:29
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

I have four names and it is no problem whatsoever in daily life here or anywhere else that I've lived.
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Old 22.06.2022, 09:42
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Baby Smith-Schmidt or
Baby Schmidt-Smith or
Baby Smith Schmidt etc.

Personal experience, fwiw. After marriage, I became Smith Schmidt. My child is Schmidt. I professionally go by Smith, socially I am Frau Schmidt. No problems at all, and I am glad it is obvious we are a family when we cross borders because our Smith and Schmidt are clearly identifiable as coming from very different parts of the world. This way, there is no question that I am my child's mother.
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Old 22.06.2022, 10:34
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

I would agree that the consideration must be what impact the name will have on the child.

Understand that even here, a last name can attract negative or positive bias. If you expect your child to grow up here (and therefore identify as Swiss), a Swiss last name may align more with his/her identity. Additionally some companies prioritise local-name job and apprenticeship applications.

My kids have my name (family name) but I doubt they will ever really identify with it, even worse, may even have difficulty with it (it is an irish "Mc..." name).
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Old 22.06.2022, 10:42
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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What rule change, when did that happen?

Hyphenated names are as possible as they were in the past. AFAIK nothing has changed regarding hyphenated names in the last 24 months . But importantly it was never for children and for spouses only.

Edit: Checked the law. Hyphenated names are still a thing
https://www.fedlex.admin.ch/eli/cc/2002/441/de#art_2

See also: https://www.englishforum.ch/daily-li...rectories.html
https://www.ch.ch/en/family-and-part...tting-married/

Switzerland has complex rules about names: spouses can keep their surnames even after marriage, or decide to share a surname, choosing that of either one of the spouses.

NB:

A double surname (both the wife and the husband's surname, such as "Rossi Bernasconi") is not permitted.
However, adding a hyphen between the surname of the wife and that of the husband (e.g. Rossi-Bernasconi) makes a difference: the surname is permitted, but may not be entered in the civil status register. You can use your hyphenated double surname in your everyday life and, if you request it, it can even be entered on your passport and other identity documents.
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  #34  
Old 22.06.2022, 13:52
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Wait, do I understand this correctly? Your children carry the name of your wife's ex?
Sure, and why not?

If it's right for my wife and children, it's right for me and if it's a problem for others, then I take note.

There are more important problems in life to solve.
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Old 22.06.2022, 14:01
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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Additionally some companies prioritise local-name job and apprenticeship applications.
If that's true, then bullet well dodged.
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  #36  
Old 22.06.2022, 19:15
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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I would agree that the consideration must be what impact the name will have on the child.

Understand that even here, a last name can attract negative or positive bias. If you expect your child to grow up here (and therefore identify as Swiss), a Swiss last name may align more with his/her identity. Additionally some companies prioritise local-name job and apprenticeship applications.

My kids have my name (family name) but I doubt they will ever really identify with it, even worse, may even have difficulty with it (it is an irish "Mc..." name).
Do you think this is still an issue? I know from a Swiss born friend whose father was an Italian immigrant and mother - a Swiss from the French cantons that having an Italian surname brought one a lot of negative bias like 25 years ago, but things have changed in the meantime. I am pretty sure these sort of things will count less and less, one's credentials and achievements will carry more weight than a name they couldn't choose anyway.

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If it's right for my wife and children, it's right for me and if it's a problem for others, then I take note.

There are more important problems in life to solve.
Basically....this. In general.

Last edited by greenmount; 22.06.2022 at 19:50.
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  #37  
Old 22.06.2022, 22:15
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Re: Naming a child with a Swiss national

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A double surname (both the wife and the husband's surname, such as "Rossi Bernasconi") is not permitted.
However, adding a hyphen between the surname of the wife and that of the husband (e.g. Rossi-Bernasconi) makes a difference: the surname is permitted, but may not be entered in the civil status register. You can use your hyphenated double surname in your everyday life and, if you request it, it can even be entered on your passport and other identity documents.
And as said, this has always been the case. The hyphened version was never in the civil register but only in the passport.

Note: If a Swiss got married while being a resident in Germany they might have got an actual, proper hyphened surname. That's perfectly o.k. as per Swiss rules the law of the country of residence applies when getting married.

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We gave our daughter a typical "Swiss" middle name, and our son a "Family" middle name.
By Swiss standards it is not a middle name, but just an extra given name. In theory one can have as man given names as they wish, but there might be some limitations in the system. Also the space in the passport is limited so not all might be listed. The child can chose any of the given name as their main one, the so called Rufname/calling name.
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