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Old 25.11.2016, 15:51
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Re: Swiss pronunciation of English

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The one thing I'd like to know, is how do you pronunce surnames with double consonants at the beginning.

Such as Llewellyn or Fforde for example.

Or Audrey fforbes-Hamilton from to the Manor Born , is the first or second consonant silent or does it get pronounced, and if so, how?

These are details that do not come across well via lipreading......
The double L is of Welsh origin and is a subtle "cL" so an exaggerated way of saying it would be "cLewellyn. The second double L is L as in hello.
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  #62  
Old 28.11.2016, 12:38
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Re: Swiss pronunciation of English

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Someone will probably point out the gap in my knowledge, but I don't think there are any words with the "ch" combination in Latin. So regardless of whether they exist in Italian, and of how "ch" is pronounced in successor languages, there's no way to pronounce it in Latin.
Sorry to resurrect this, I only just saw the responses to my post.

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Non scholę sed vitę discimus.

By the way, Seneca the Younger actually wrote it the other way 'round.

Besides that, there are lots of other Greek words containing "ch" in Latin (scholé actually is Greek too and means leisure time (!!!)). But since literate Romans were meant to be fluent in Greek, of course they would never have pronounced it the modern English way.
Indeed, there are lots of Greek words containing "ch" in Latin. They are, as you say, Greek words. They are not Latin words. You may just as well claim that the word "die Pizza" is German, or "le week-end" French, because those words appear in the respective dictionaries.

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Well, there's something called dictionary. Have a look at it and tell us whether there's a ch digraph or not
Please go ahead and have a look at this thing you call a dictionary. There is no "ch" digraph in Latin.

The Romans used ch to transliterate the sound of the Greek letter chi in words borrowed from that language.
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  #63  
Old 28.11.2016, 13:04
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Re: Swiss pronunciation of English

Thanks, you've enlightened us, lol.
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  #64  
Old 28.11.2016, 13:47
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Re: Swiss pronunciation of English

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Please go ahead and have a look at this thing you call a dictionary. There is no "ch" digraph in Latin.

The Romans used ch to transliterate the sound of the Greek letter chi in words borrowed from that language.
So, I was right with Chiasso and Porchetta. In Italian the c deteriorated but the ch (before i and e) survived and is still like old Latin.
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Old 28.11.2016, 15:21
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Re: Swiss pronunciation of English

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Non scholę sed vitę discimus.
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Indeed, there are lots of Greek words containing "ch" in Latin. They are, as you say, Greek words. They are not Latin words. You may just as well claim that the word "die Pizza" is German, or "le week-end" French, because those words appear in the respective dictionaries.
I had chosen "schola" on purpose, because, as far as I can tell, it is a loanword, with a Latin ending too, not perceived as being Greek anymore, with a different meaning even, just like "car" in Swiss German and French.
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Old 30.11.2016, 15:43
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Re: Swiss pronunciation of English

I don't think there are any trends especially. Command of language varies per person and day. Sometimes tiredness affects pronunciation.
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