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Old 16.07.2010, 11:08
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NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

Hello all.

With temperatures staying high many of you will be swimming in the lakes and pools here in Switzerland. This calls for extra vigilance, especially when kids are around. Many of you may be surprised to learn that a potentially drowning person may not behave or act the way it is depicted on TV or movies, nor the way you expect them to.
Many kids and adults often drown in full view of others.

The following short article was written by an experienced Navy and Coast Guard survival and rescue specialist. It describes the physiology of this phenomenon, as well as the signs to look out for.

Please read, inform and distribute. You may just save a life.

Drowning doesn't look like drowning

PS: I personally believe CPR training should be compulsory for all; especially for parents.
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Old 16.07.2010, 11:27
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

If that website is a bit slow, here is the article:

Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning


by Mario on May 18, 2010
in Water Safety,gCaptain


Translations: - SpanishRomanianSwedishCzech

The new captain jumped from the cockpit, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard, he kept his eyes on his victim as he headed straight for the owners who were swimming between their anchored sportfisher and the beach. “I think he thinks you’re drowning,” the husband said to his wife. They had been splashing each other and she had screamed but now they were just standing, neck-deep on the sand bar. “We’re fine, what is he doing?” she asked, a little annoyed. “We’re fine!” the husband yelled, waving him off, but his captain kept swimming hard. ”Move!” he barked as he sprinted between the stunned owners. Directly behind them, not ten feet away, their nine-year-old daughter was drowning. Safely above the surface in the arms of the captain, she burst into tears, “Daddy!”

How did this captain know – from fifty feet away – what the father couldn’t recognize from just ten?
Drowning is not the violent, splashing, call for help that most people expect. The captain was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, had learned what drowning looks like by watching television. If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that’s all of us) then you should make sure that you and your crew knows what to look for whenever people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, “Daddy,” she hadn’t made a sound. As a former Coast Guard rescue swimmer, I wasn’t surprised at all by this story. Drowning is almost always a deceptively quiet event. The waving, splashing, and yelling that dramatic conditioning (television) prepares us to look for, is rarely seen in real life.


The Instinctive Drowning Response – so named by Francesco A. Pia, Ph.D., is what people do to avoid actual or perceived suffocation in the water. And it does not look like most people expect. There is very little splashing, no waving, and no yelling or calls for help of any kind.
To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic from the surface drowning can be, consider this: It is the number two cause of accidental death in children, age 15 and under (just behind vehicle accidents) – of the approximately 750 children who will drown next year, about 375 of them will do so within 25 yards of a parent or other adult. In ten percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch them do it, having no idea it is happening (source: CDC). Drowning does not look like drowning – Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene Magazine, described the instinctive drowning response like this:
  1. Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled, before speech occurs.
  2. Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.
  3. Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water, permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.
  4. Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.
  5. From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.
(Source: On Scene Magazine: Fall 2006 (page 14))
This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble – they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the instinctive drowning response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long – but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc.




Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water:
  • Head low in the water, mouth at water level
  • Head tilted back with mouth open
  • Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
  • Eyes closed
  • Hair over forehead or eyes
  • Not using legs – Vertical
  • Hyperventilating or gasping
  • Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
  • Trying to roll over on the back
  • Ladder climb, rarely out of the water.
So if a crew member falls overboard and everything looks OK – don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you alright?” If they can answer at all – they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them.

And parents – children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.
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Old 16.07.2010, 12:19
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

I pull a 4 year old boy out of a swimming pool yesterday. Luckily I saw the child jump from the edge onto an air matress, then fall straight into the water. It took me about 10 seconds to reach him, during which time he was completely submerged, desparately trying to tread water. It wasn't until I had him out of the water and was carrying him back to his mum that anyone even noticed he had fallen in. He was fine; just a bit shocked, as was his mum. Even now, I'm really quite shaken by the whole event; seeing him under the water, struggling to get out. It hits home for a couple of reasons:

Firstly, we've just bought a house with a pool (we have 2 young children (2 & 4and before moving we had a fence built around the pool. We also keep it covered when not in use).

Secondly, my mum's brother wandered off when he was 3 and drowned after falling into a river.
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Old 16.07.2010, 12:57
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

Dan of the dead : Do you also have a detector in your pool ? The fence and detector are a must in France, I hope it is also the case in Swizterland.

Having a 6 year old who can't swim well and a nearly 2 year old who runs everywhere I never go to the swimming pool alone, which is kind of sad with such beautiful weather. It means we can only go at weekends with my husband.
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Old 16.07.2010, 13:06
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

First, thank you sooooo very much for posting this information. Having lived near the water most of my life, I learned to swim at a very young age which does NOT mean that every time I entered the water I was perfectly fine though...

Having experienced the panic of finding myself in a swimming situation that proved to be too much for me, I really hope that many more people learn to recognize when there is trouble brewing or even actually happening.

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PS: I personally believe CPR training should be compulsory for all; especially for parents.
After requiring help myself (thankfully not to the extent of CPR though) AND having helped someone else in distress once, I want to add though that CPR is really not enough when it comes to water safety / assistance.

I do not say this to discourage folks from taking CPR training but rather to highlight the importance of knowing what you can and can not handle when attempting to save someone in trouble.

If you own a pool, you should make sure that either the water is shallow enough that all the adults can at least touch bottom (while their head is above water) OR you should make sure that you have flotation devices readily available on EACH side of the pool (preferably both though).

Thankfully the time I was in trouble, I'd not yet reached the mindless stage of panic but it was getting close, however, one occasion I was at a hotel pool while on vacation with my family and instinctively reached out to another girl who was really panicking. I could not touch bottom and I ended up in trouble too as the girl tried to climb up my body like it was a tree in effort to get herself out of trouble.

I was lucky... hopefully someone else won't have to be and will be smart and prepared instead.
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Last edited by Peg A; 16.07.2010 at 13:08. Reason: forgot a thought.
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Old 16.07.2010, 13:06
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

This will make me a lot more aware this weekend down by the lake. And that's certainly not a bad thing!
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Old 24.05.2011, 11:25
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Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

I think this is a healthy read for everyone, especially parents.

Quote:
Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you alright?” If they can answer at all – they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents – children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.
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Old 24.05.2011, 11:30
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Re: Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

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I think this is a healthy read for everyone, especially parents.

Same warning was given last year but certainly worth repeating.
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Old 24.05.2011, 11:32
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Re: Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

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I think this is a healthy read for everyone, especially parents.
Also a reminder for many adults, there's still a couple dozen people drowning every year because most swimmers overestimate their abilities. Always go for a swim with your friends or at least watch out for other swimmers in your vicinity as well..!

Last edited by herc82; 24.05.2011 at 11:56.
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Old 24.05.2011, 12:40
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Re: Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

And I thought I was going to see this

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Old 24.05.2011, 16:33
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

You can end up in a fight with someone going under, if they're conscious. They can be panicking so much they lunge at you and if they're bigger / stronger / heavier they can pull you down too. It may seem brutal, but a sharp smack in the face before hooking yourself around them helps keep you in charge. Then command them to help you kick kick kick, if they're capable.

Doing this while the world carries on splashing about and having fun can seem very surreal; nobody will notice, even under their noses. Expect to be exhausted and furious when nobody else comes to assist!
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Old 24.05.2011, 17:07
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

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Doing this while the world carries on splashing about and having fun can seem very surreal; nobody will notice, even under their noses. Expect to be exhausted and furious when nobody else comes to assist!

for this reason it is also wise to inform other people about your moves and give them further instructions, before one attempts to rescue someone else (in case oher persons are around).


also got to know that there are a lot of young kids who can't swim/ or aren't properly trained nowadays. This can also lead to a drama when those kids get in dangerous situations.
I've read that there had been an increase swimming accidents because this problematic is underestimated..
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Old 24.05.2011, 17:24
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

It's important to instill in your kid that water can be dangerous, especially if you have a little fish at home like we do. It is important to explain what drowning is and demonstrate, show pics (of lungs and how can water come in, not drown people). Pools are like cute big tubs for them, they do not associate danger with them at all. She is 4 and now realizing what death is, so it is easy to explain. She was never left alone in water, maybe also because I knew how pulled into deep water she always was, the minute we turned away she was swimming into deep waters since she was 2, some kids just have that desire to float, staying in water till her lips were completely blue and teeth were clicking. She taught herself to swim, and move around with kicks, I didn't care she has no technique but that she can do a few meters without help, in case she would need that before she learns to swim properly.

We have beautiful pools around in the area, the most basic things to stick with were: never leave your kid unattended, never have her in the swim ring that she could fall through (must be smaller) and never rely on swim wings only (I almost drown with them at 3, still remember looking through the water and still hear the water sounds, in 2m depth). And, do not take small kids into any current driven play areas, the current is usually quite strong and they can slip from your arms and be carried under, inhaling water. Teach your kids to take proper turns when on a slide and not jump on one another's back when sliding without pause. If there are water guns (like in Divonne), supervise the play and stop kids aiming the strong water gun at other kids' heads.

I was a traumatology ER nurse long time ago, and the patient who most stuck in my memory was a 16 kid who jumped into shallow water not knowing how shallow it was and broke his neck, quadruplegic. He didn't drown because a girl saved him and dragged him out, but what his life is like now, who knows. Teens can do some extremely dangerous things at a pool side, especially if they drink or want to show off.
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Old 24.05.2011, 18:04
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

I saved a drowning 11 year old who´s bigger than me last year. I had my period so i was like the life guard there. The lifeguard was busy smoking and chatting with someone. He rushed towards us to help but i remember seeing him running in slow motion taking his shirt off and then sun glasses off...like a model or in a movie...surreal.

I wont ever forget that day. I was a hero, a bloody hero.
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Old 24.05.2011, 18:57
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

Thanks for bringing this to everyones attention.

A couple of years ago, I was living close to the beach and decided whilst my OH was having a beer on the deck above the beach, to go for swim to and watch the sunset from the water. By this time, the lifeguards were packing up, but I thought I wouldn't be long and I could just swim back. However, the tide started going out, as soon as I had swum out and it so a really strong current, that everytime I tried to get out, I was sucked underneath the water, and pushed down underneath. Everytime I tried to catch my breath, the same thing happened... I saw the lifeguards, and tried to wave for some help, but they just didn't see me. I knew the best thing to do was to let the water take me out and try to swim back when it was calmer, but I was so tired (I was pregnant at the time) and scared that I just wanted to be out the water. I really thought I was going to die, and my baby too. After what seemed like forever, I saw my OH and another man run towards me. My OH tried to pull me out, but he couldn't because the water sucked him too. Luckily this other man, a lot taller and bigger build had the strength to run into the water and pulled me out.

I just wanted to warn people that water has the power over you, as much as you think you are a confident swimmer, just take caution and always tell people where you are going. If I hadn't have told my partner that I was popping for a swim, which I haven't always done... I probably wouldn't have been saved.
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Old 24.05.2011, 19:33
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

Another time i sort of saved someone was when swimming altogether in a huge pool when my cousin started clawing at me and tried standing on me just a few meters off the edge. It was quite deep and drained all my adrenaline to keep swimming while dragging her and eventually pushed her to safety. All the time i was submerged, i could have died then.

Some people would tell you to punch a drowning person unconscious (?) before saving him because its normal that they pull and you drown altogether.
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Old 24.05.2011, 19:46
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

The worst was on a beach in Virginia when the waves were so strong, despite being in 20cms of water, they hit my legs, got me off balance and pulled me down and under, I couldn't believe it, even in such shallow waters. I ate so much sand, blech.

Thanks for the thread, such a good idea.
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Old 24.05.2011, 19:52
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

Takes me back to the old "Joe and Petunia" public awareness ads they used to run on TV:


Last edited by Nev; 24.05.2011 at 20:15.
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Old 25.05.2011, 08:07
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

Another things to watch out for are those large inflatables that kids play on in the pools. When I was about seven I almost drowned under one of these things

I was a really confident swimmer and was practising swimming underwater. When I had started there were no inflatables in the pool but when I tried to come up for air at one point I found myself under an inflatable Lilo. It didn't matter which way I swam the thing seemed to still be above me. Thankfully my Dad had his watchful eye on me and grabbed me by the foot and dragged me out from under it.

On the same holiday a little girl of around two fell into the pool. Her parents were nowhere in sight and thankfully yet again my Dad saved the day and dived in to retrieve her. The parents didn't even thank him and in fact got quite shitty with him
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Old 25.05.2011, 09:15
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Re: NOTE: When drowning doesn't look like drowning

I almost drowned also when I was seven in the apartment complex swimming pool we were living in in New Jersey. I wasn't a strong swimmer and was in the deep end near the wall. But all of the sudden the wall was too far away from me...

then a stranger rescued me and all I remember is waking up on our living room couch. My parents won't talk about it
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