Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Education
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09.10.2017, 19:08
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: U.S.
Posts: 4
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
neas has no particular reputation at present
international or montessori

Hi- i have 2 questions that i am hoping people can weigh in on

First- Does anyone know of any Montessori schools in the Baar area that go beyond kindergarten, or do Montessori schools end at ~age 6 (kindergarten year)? My youngest children will be 3 and 4.5 when we arrive for a 3 year assignment in Baar.

Second: how would you compare the quality of education in international schools to Montessori schools in the Baar area? I have always loved the Montessori method, and our preschoolers are current enrolled in Montessori, but I don't know anything about Montessori in Switzerland. In the U.S. a child who completes Montessori kindergarten is usually said to be at the 2nd grade level in math and reading, compared to public school, even though the classrooms are play based and self directed.

Thanks in advance for any insight. We are at the fairly early stages of our research on schooling options, so any input is helpful.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09.10.2017, 19:14
roegner's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Zurich
Posts: 5,359
Groaned at 185 Times in 161 Posts
Thanked 5,761 Times in 2,903 Posts
roegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

It is a bit simpler here. You go to the school allocated to you because of the area you live in.

You can opt to go to a private school, but that can be expensive (especially the international schools)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09.10.2017, 20:51
NotAllThere's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Baselland
Posts: 9,622
Groaned at 147 Times in 129 Posts
Thanked 13,396 Times in 5,428 Posts
NotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
It is a bit simpler here. You go to the school allocated to you because of the area you live in.

You can opt to go to a private school, but that can be expensive (especially the international schools)
The OP said Montessori or International. Both of those are private.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank NotAllThere for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 12.10.2017, 19:32
araqyl's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Zurich, West-side
Posts: 1,519
Groaned at 6 Times in 5 Posts
Thanked 652 Times in 376 Posts
araqyl has a reputation beyond reputearaqyl has a reputation beyond reputearaqyl has a reputation beyond reputearaqyl has a reputation beyond reputearaqyl has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

I know of Futura Montessori School in Baar, which runs from 3-12 years of age (so until the end of primary school).

Strangely, their website is not up at the moment (www.futuraschule.com). It says it's down temporarily, so maybe they're doing holiday upgrades to the website. Maybe try an email: administration@futuraschule.com

Enjoy the move!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12.10.2017, 20:46
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 104
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 150 Times in 65 Posts
Tox_Rat is considered knowledgeableTox_Rat is considered knowledgeableTox_Rat is considered knowledgeable
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
In the U.S. a child who completes Montessori kindergarten is usually said to be at the 2nd grade level in math and reading, compared to public school, even though the classrooms are play based and self directed.
Only in the sales literature. The crap they sell to parents is sometimes unbelievable.

It's not that there is something wrong with a Montessori education, but I've met kids who went to Montessori kindergarten in the States and those who went to public school. Given enough students and controlling for socioeconomic factors and literacy and numeracy skills at entrance, there isn't a real difference between those populations. It is just a period of rapid development change in cognition and some kids are quick to become literate and numerate, some are slower. Moreover, the kids are not necessarily in both groups. No school is going to make your student two grades ahead unless he or she was on the faster track anyway.

I don't have a good answer to your question, but I can tell you that there are a lot of benefits to sending your children to the local primary school/kindergarten. Kids that age generally don't have any difficulty acquiring the local language through play and interaction with their peers. And they learn it in a way that they have a greater chance of retaining it after departure. The local schools are also generally pretty decent in Switzerland; they vary, but my not-firsthand impression is they do not vary nearly as much as in some places in the US.

In summary, I wouldn't discount the free local schools here, even though you are coming from abroad for a short-term assignment. Regardless of the benefits package you may be receiving for the move, I personally thing local tuition is a pretty good investment in the kids' education. However, I'm not a parent, so others with kids will feel free to agree or disagree.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Tox_Rat for this useful post:
  #6  
Old 12.10.2017, 22:23
MusicChick's Avatar
modified and reprogrammed
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 10,895
Groaned at 112 Times in 89 Posts
Thanked 12,981 Times in 6,448 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

The difference is - private schools offer full time tuition. Local schools do not, so one ends up outsourcing different ways of day care in off school hours, anyways, and it can come up to quite a lot of money. So to present the local system as free - it is, if one only counts those few hours kids actually spend in the class. Lunches, morning and evening recess is not free, as a single parent substituting all there is, for us all the cost could have come up close to a full time private school. There are other advantages that I chose the local system for, not just cost: language immersion, geo distance, independence of kids being a goal, networking, knowing our community better and integration.

Now - as an educator, in terms of cognition - in my experience the best environment is not necessarily Montessori, Steiner, local, private...international. But stress-reduced. Positive and encouraging. Kids are really active to look for stimuli in a lot of the stuff adults discount. But a stressed kid will not.

Good luck OP, choosing the best for your children and congratulation on being involved parents.
__________________
"L'homme ne peut pas remplacer son coeur avec sa tete, ni sa tete avec ses mains." J.H.Pestalozzi

ἀρχὴ ἥμισυ παντός

Last edited by MusicChick; 12.10.2017 at 22:45.
Reply With Quote
The following 5 users would like to thank MusicChick for this useful post:
  #7  
Old 12.10.2017, 22:32
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 104
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 150 Times in 65 Posts
Tox_Rat is considered knowledgeableTox_Rat is considered knowledgeableTox_Rat is considered knowledgeable
Re: international or montessori

I agree wholeheartedly with the above, OP. The kids will be out of public school a significant amount of the work week compared to the US. And getting a place in after-school care is usually expensive and difficult at times. So yeah, "free" doesn't necessarily mean free.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Tox_Rat for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 12.10.2017, 22:43
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 21,142
Groaned at 1,095 Times in 862 Posts
Thanked 23,808 Times in 11,378 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
The difference is - private schools offer full time tuition. Local schools do not, so one ends up outsourcing different ways of day care in off school hours, anyways, and it can come up to quite a lot of money. So to present the local system as free - it is, if one only counts those few hours kids actually spend in the class. Lunches, morning and evening recess is not free, as a single parent substituting all there is, for us all the cost could have come up almost to close to a full time private school.
For me, as a single parent, the cost was zero.

Kids went to school when I left for work , came home for lunch at the same time as I did, returned to school when I returned to work, etc.

Tom
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank st2lemans for this useful post:
  #9  
Old 12.10.2017, 22:49
MusicChick's Avatar
modified and reprogrammed
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 10,895
Groaned at 112 Times in 89 Posts
Thanked 12,981 Times in 6,448 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
For me, as a single parent, the cost was zero.

Kids went to school when I left for work , came home for lunch at the same time as I did, returned to school when I returned to work, etc.

Tom
What did they have for lunch, was it still moving? Did they hunt it themselves?

I love how convenient and sensible the country life had it here, and still has, some places. Totally jealous, moi.

Anyways, I hope OP chooses the right thing for their family. And that it is hands-on.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12.10.2017, 22:56
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 21,142
Groaned at 1,095 Times in 862 Posts
Thanked 23,808 Times in 11,378 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
What did they have for lunch, was it still moving? Did they hunt it themselves?
They could cook, as I did, it's not difficult.

They knew how to use the meat slicer, stove, oven, etc.

What's the big deal?

Tom
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12.10.2017, 23:03
MusicChick's Avatar
modified and reprogrammed
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 10,895
Groaned at 112 Times in 89 Posts
Thanked 12,981 Times in 6,448 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
They could cook, as I did, it's not difficult.

They knew how to use the meat slicer, stove, oven, etc.

What's the big deal?

Tom
Lol, I know it is hard to read between the lines. Nothing is a big deal. I do not know a parent who would not go for the same arrangement, if they could. If they worked in the same town, doof, etc. etc.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 13.10.2017, 09:42
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 6,061
Groaned at 211 Times in 163 Posts
Thanked 7,419 Times in 4,000 Posts
greenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
They could cook, as I did, it's not difficult.

They knew how to use the meat slicer, stove, oven, etc.

What's the big deal?

Tom
When were they able to care of themselves? Since they were in kindergarten?

I'm all for independence as I was an independent kid starting with second or third grade, but there were other times and I myself was a super-serious kid. Also, the school schedule wasn't split in two parts like here so once I came home I started to do my homework and play till my mom would come, there was always food to warm up only, I could do that. Would this system function here, today, I don't know and wouldn't want to try in a bigger city. So each situation is different.
That being said, the enrolment of a child into the local school system is more than immersion into a foreign language, is also acquiring a sense of belonging, if parents plan to live here for a long time. In canton Zurich at least now most schools can provide lunch upon request, not for free of course but adjusted to the parents' income. (can seem a tad unfair for those who have to pay more for the same meal, but didn't hear anyone complaining too much about that) or/and find a "mother for the day" for a much lower cost. I think in the end is pretty manageable for most people and one can look for options cost wise.
That is not to say I'm against any other type of school.

P.S. This is written from the perspective of someone who is very community oriented, loved my childhood and would like my kids to have at least what I had - not material things, because there is obviously incomparable more here, but from the social standpoint.

Last edited by greenmount; 13.10.2017 at 09:59.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 13.10.2017, 09:58
Sandgrounder's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: ZH
Posts: 10,672
Groaned at 86 Times in 79 Posts
Thanked 17,712 Times in 6,803 Posts
Sandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
I agree wholeheartedly with the above, OP. The kids will be out of public school a significant amount of the work week compared to the US. And getting a place in after-school care is usually expensive and difficult at times. So yeah, "free" doesn't necessarily mean free.
The costs of extra curricula care are shouldered by the parents, though, and only then when they need them.

Compared to the surrounding European countries, these costs are fairly high here BUT, our taxes are comparatively low. For some, very low.

I struggle to understand why people complain that they have to pay a lot for these kinds of services yet still don't mind benefiting from paying lower taxes. It's not just an expat thing - Swiss mums I know are often moaning about the cost of putting little Johnny into lunchtime care for XYZ francs per month, then a further ABC francs for care from 4-6pm.

The money has to come from somewhere.

When a child no longer needs these extra services, you no longer pay for them. You don't continue paying for it through your taxes.
__________________
A hero is someone who understands the responsibility that comes with his freedom. Bob Dylan
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 13.10.2017, 10:26
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: la cote
Posts: 2,840
Groaned at 15 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 2,220 Times in 1,254 Posts
runningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post

When a child no longer needs these extra services, you no longer pay for them. You don't continue paying for it through your taxes.
I don't know how it is in each canton or commune but around my place indeed the commune subsidises the care. No parent pays actual costs. The creche for the young ones and the afterschool care/lunch is all subsidised by the local authorities, in this case several communes in it together, and comes from the local tax coffers. In the case of creche, the fees are adjusted based on income. So indeed some kids get a free lunch from the taxpayers. Also the local authorities limit the slots because they could not afford to subsidise it for everyone.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 13.10.2017, 10:32
Sandgrounder's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: ZH
Posts: 10,672
Groaned at 86 Times in 79 Posts
Thanked 17,712 Times in 6,803 Posts
Sandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond reputeSandgrounder has a reputation beyond repute
Re: international or montessori

Quote:
View Post
I don't know how it is in each canton or commune but around my place indeed the commune subsidises the care. No parent pays actual costs. The creche for the young ones and the afterschool care/lunch is all subsidised by the local authorities, in this case several communes in it together, and comes from the local tax coffers. In the case of creche, the fees are adjusted based on income. So indeed some kids get a free lunch from the taxpayers. Also the local authorities limit the slots because they could not afford to subsidise it for everyone.
I guess it varies around the country and from canton to canton to a certain extent but the OP was specifying the area around Zug (Baar) and their taxes are low.

From my experience in Zurich, some tax is used for the infrastructure but the rates for placing your child in the afterschool care reflect its service.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
international school, montessori, schools in baar, schools in zug




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bilingual Montessori (or democratic) primary schools? Olivita Family matters/health 1 21.05.2015 21:15
School advice needed: Montessori Rietberg vs Bilingual International School of ZH claire71 Education 0 19.01.2014 22:22
Per-school: Montessori Vs International School, Zurich Herme Education 1 28.04.2013 22:44
Montessori Micki's school or CEM or Champittet or...??? Anahe Family matters/health 4 09.09.2011 22:32
Montessori or Steiner Schools? nicnac Family matters/health 27 23.10.2010 12:47


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 00:25.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0