Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Education  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 15.12.2019, 14:10
Jim2007's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Kt. Bern
Posts: 4,557
Groaned at 125 Times in 108 Posts
Thanked 5,445 Times in 2,576 Posts
Jim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
Military school or boys ranch for troubled youth? There are programs that will take a 12 year old.
Perhaps you could suggest the names of a few such schools in Zurich...
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 15.12.2019, 15:18
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 5,779
Groaned at 52 Times in 41 Posts
Thanked 7,805 Times in 3,262 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
Moving, is there still room for negotiation on your husband's package?

If so, perhaps you might discuss adding to the international school place benefit a clause something like "or the equivalent in professional special needs therapy, intervention, or schooling/education fees."

This way you would at least not lose the financial benefit if you had to find alternative schooling or support for you child.
Yes, meloncollie, I think this is an excellent suggestion. Especially because of the way the Swiss system works, as Jim says:

Quote:
View Post
The bottom line is that the state, or more specifically the kanton of Zürich in this case, is legally responsible for finding a solution to his educational needs, they cannot just abandon him, although you may not agree with their solution. The difficulty though will be that without a label for his condition it will be hard for public schools to access funding and support for him.

.... If the problem continues then you can expect a lot of educational people will get involved as they cannot just expel him and walk away. It won’t be a pleasant experience, but you won’t be abandoned either.

I would suggest you make it a priority to get a diagnosis for him.
Therefore, OP, I wonder whether you could start the other way around: first bring your son here and take him to the local, free, government school. They are mostly reasonably well run, and they do hold the full responsibility for ensuring that your son gets schooling. Tell your son that he will have to learn German, but that the new school is totally geared for the many children who arrive from all over the world not yet speaking German.

New children are, to start with, always given a space in the local school, no questions asked, no exclusions possible. New children are always given special language support. Depending on the school region, they are sometimes in a special integration class, or sometimes an extra tutor or helper is assigned to them while they are in the regular classes, until they've acquired sufficient skills to go along with the regular classes without help.

Such an integration phase typically takes some weeks to some months to a year. During that time, your son's level of school achievement will be assessed and he will be given schoolwork according to what he CAN do, i.e. he will not go down to the bottom of the class just on account of his language skills. Your son's general abilities, also behaviourally, will be assessed during this time, too, and you will be helped to see a school psychologist or provided with other help.

If your husband has succeeded at meloncollie's suggestion, then you will have that extra budget available to pay for other kinds of help, therapy, tutorship or interests of your son, on sport and museums and music and karate, or on whatever will make you all feel better about living here, and enjoying the many good things on offer.

Last edited by doropfiz; 15.12.2019 at 15:46.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank doropfiz for this useful post:
  #23  
Old 15.12.2019, 15:45
olygirl's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: d' Innerschwiiz
Posts: 5,892
Groaned at 247 Times in 167 Posts
Thanked 13,090 Times in 3,989 Posts
olygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Public school:

I do not see how putting a 12 year old in a public school here in Switzerland without knowing German will help him. In fact, it may exacerbate his condition due to the frustration of not being understood or accepted.

Private School:

Check out the private school and talk to the principal. You want your child to be in a safe place but the safety of others is also imperative.

Medication:
Your son MAY have ADS and medication may help his issues. I have seen miracles happen with the right dosage, but I've also seen children become lethargic or drowsy with the incorrect amount of medication.

Apprenticeships (for 15+)
Take a look at Switzerland's apprenticeship program for your son's possible future education. It's for kids who have graduated from middle school and have the opportunity to work three days a week and go to school the other two.

Your son may outgrow his anger issues and/or ADS; in fact, it happens quite often. Until then, good luck and hang in there.
__________________
Faith isn't about everything turning out okay. Faith is about being okay no matter how things turn out.
Reply With Quote
The following 7 users would like to thank olygirl for this useful post:
  #24  
Old 15.12.2019, 16:00
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 5,779
Groaned at 52 Times in 41 Posts
Thanked 7,805 Times in 3,262 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
Public school:
I do not see how putting a 12 year old in a public school here in Switzerland without knowing German will help him. In fact, it may exacerbate his condition due to the frustration of not being understood or accepted.
I mentioned it as a potentially helpful route precisely because OP said that no-one, thus far, had been able to identify or diagnose exactly what the real issue is. The integration classes are specifically designed to promote a sense of being understood and accepted.

Those classes have three declared aims:
  • to teach the children enough German for them to cope in a regular class
  • to find out a new child's level of competence in each subject. Depending on their previous syllabi and their own capabilities, a child may arrive with a skill set that is advanced or lagging behing, relative to the Swiss school requirements,
    for example, a child have phenomenally good sense of climate science and geography (but not Swiss geography), severly lack music knowledge, be just under-par at maths, while being way ahead of Swiss children of that age, in biology
    and to help them maintain their confidence in what they can already do well, and to catch up in the areas where a Swiss part might be lacking.

Because this is a process of some time, those teachers are attentive to understanding all sorts of aspects of the children's abilities and behaviours. They are accustomed to working with children who've just arrived, and they know that, even under the best circumstances, immigrating is stressful. They are accustomed to calling in other professional help as need be, to separating some children from the class for a subject or for a phase, and bringing them back together. In short, their third aim is
  • to teach not just language, but integration, and there's a big social aspect to that.

I thought that, in this way, OP's son would have the benefit of an ongoing, and perhaps in that way more useful overall assessment. All the children do leave the integration class, and their sojourn there helps to take the decision of "what's next?".

Quote:
View Post
Apprenticeships (for 15+)
Take a look at Switzerland's apprenticeship program for your son's possible future education. It's for kids who have graduated from middle school and have the opportunity to work three days a week and go to school the other two.
Yes, these are excellent. For them, the child will need to have a command of German. For that reason, too, I thought that an integration class would be a good way to get the groundwork done, so that he'd be able to manage an apprenticeship later, when the time comes, just three years from now.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank doropfiz for this useful post:
  #25  
Old 15.12.2019, 16:25
kri's Avatar
kri kri is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Currently not in Switzerland
Posts: 1,132
Groaned at 11 Times in 11 Posts
Thanked 739 Times in 412 Posts
kri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

My suggestion is to be very open with the school and the kind of support your child will need. If they are reticent to take him, it will anyway likely not be the right environment for him.

Public schools do have an obligation to put in place support but difficult without a "label" - i.e. diagnosis and also many are nowadays lacking the funds and often suggest private schools to get out of their obligations. So yes the obligation is there but you will have to push hard.

If you have a choice where to live, maybe avoid a vlage and try the city where they may be more accustomed to integration issues.

The KJPP in Zurich is the children psychaiatrist unit and they diagnose the children by doing tests to the children and also talking to the parents and going to school to observe them. This is all covered by your basic health insurance but have long waiting times, so would suggest booking yourself in asap when you arrive and ask for someone English speaking.

Can you start intensive German classes now? There is a German school in HK, if he is getting kicked out anyway, could you transition there for second semester until summer?

Speak to your husband company about the situation and ask for a "study allowance" versus them paying the international school so that you can use for different things. Ask for it to be indexed just in case you do use it for international school as the costs grow each year.

And lastly... How is there not a diagnosis? This is not me blaming you but I am genuinely surprised that school and professionals cannot figure something out - what kind of testing has been carried out? How is the behaviour at home? Could it be he behaves extra well at home and let's out frustrations at school? Could it be something happened at school to make him reticent?

Hang in there!
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank kri for this useful post:
  #26  
Old 15.12.2019, 16:41
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Singapore
Posts: 6
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 10 Times in 4 Posts
Moving has no particular reputation at present
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Thank you everyone for you helpful replies. All my comments are still being moderated before they are posted so my apologies for the delay in reply. I am reading every message though.

I think I agree that it might make sense to put him in local school if he gets language (and other) support. At the very least, at least it will get him in the 'system' for any support that is available.

This move might end up being life-changing for him, if he can get some better help than we've been able to find here.

Thank you so much.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Moving for this useful post:
  #27  
Old 15.12.2019, 18:00
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 5,779
Groaned at 52 Times in 41 Posts
Thanked 7,805 Times in 3,262 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Here's a link of the City of Zurich, for newcomer children and their parents
https://vsa.zh.ch/internet/bildungsd...ewanderte.html
and another setting out the concept for integration of children from abroad
https://vsa.zh.ch/internet/bildungsd...igration0.html.

See also this about learning German:
https://vsa.zh.ch/internet/bildungsd...rLP21/daz.html

Please note that in different contexts the word "integration" can be understood with regard to the process of integrating newcomer children from abroad, as I decribed in post 24 above, but it is also used to mean that children who have special needs attend school in the same classes as children who have no such special needs.

I agree fully with the other posters above, that everything is much more likely to fall into place once a proper diagnosis (if there is one) can be found. With that, resources are made available. Even if you - within the system and resources you now have available - have not been able to obtain that (no reproach from me), it is likely that your son will be seen by several professionals here, to try to find out what they think he needs, what you think, and what the boy himself thinks that he needs.

If there is any leeway to help him learn some German before you get here, then so much the better.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 15.12.2019, 18:30
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Zürich
Posts: 63
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 103 Times in 39 Posts
jazh is considered knowledgeablejazh is considered knowledgeablejazh is considered knowledgeable
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
The bottom line is that the state, or more specifically the kanton of Zürich in this case, is legally responsible for finding a solution to his educational needs, they cannot just abandon him, although you may not agree with their solution.
To be a little more precise than Jim2007's essentially correct comments...

In Zürich, the Kanton (through the local community school) is responsible for a school solution ONLY until the child has had 9 years of education, not longer. (I believe that there are exceptions to this (perhaps until the child is 20) when the child has some specific diagnosis.)

Additionally the educational law states that each child has the right to adequate schooling (which should not be confused with ideal schooling). How adequate is defined is differently in different communities by the local school psychologists and school boards.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank jazh for this useful post:
  #29  
Old 15.12.2019, 20:18
Traubert's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Zug
Posts: 972
Groaned at 10 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 1,779 Times in 639 Posts
Traubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond reputeTraubert has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

If he’s in an international school now, I’m assuming you’re expats there? If he’s otherwise a nice kid and only picks up negativity outside and in school, maybe he doesn’t feel well there? Are you Singaporeans? If not, maybe he doesn’t feel well as an expat, maybe he feels like a displaced person?

I feel for him and hope that he doesn’t feel he needs to be wear the suit that psychotherapy gives him. If everyone else thinks there’s a problem, maybe he’ll come to believe it.

I hope that he can settle himself.
__________________
We are monkeys with money and guns.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Traubert for this useful post:
  #30  
Old 15.12.2019, 23:25
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 5,779
Groaned at 52 Times in 41 Posts
Thanked 7,805 Times in 3,262 Posts
doropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond reputedoropfiz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
Additionally the educational law states that each child has the right to adequate schooling (which should not be confused with ideal schooling). How adequate is defined is differently in different communities by the local school psychologists and school boards.
That's a very good point.

Quote:
View Post
To be a little more precise than Jim2007's essentially correct comments...

In Zürich, the Kanton (through the local community school) is responsible for a school solution ONLY until the child has had 9 years of education, not longer. (I believe that there are exceptions to this (perhaps until the child is 20) when the child has some specific diagnosis.)
About the 9 years: yes, that's correct. But this does not mean that if a child started school, abroad, at the age of 3 or 4, as is the case in some countries, that when they arrive in Switzerland they've only got a remaining school-time until they are 12 or 13.
It means the way it is usually counted in Switzerland.

Like everything else, the starting age differs from canton to canton. In the canton of Zurich (where OP is heading), children typically start Kindergarten around the age of 4 or 5, and spend 2 years there, moving to the First Class of school when aged 6 or 7. That's when the clock starts running, i.e. up until 15 or 16. Strictly speaking, it's actually 11 obligatory years of school, since the Kindergarten years are compulsory, too.
https://www.stadt-zuerich.ch/ssd/de/...hulsystem.html

Having said that, the Swiss are very pragmatic. It is considered perfectly reasonable for a child moving into the Swiss system (or, in fact, for any child along the way) to repeat a year, if need be, and this carries no shame or stigma. It could therefore be that the child in this thread arrives at 12, and spends one or two years in the integration class and possibly repeating the last year of primary school, and then will go to secondary school.

If a transition has been made, and seems to be working, it is highly unlikely that anyone would prevent the child from completing his secondary schooling, just because he happens to turn 17.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank doropfiz for this useful post:
  #31  
Old 16.12.2019, 00:05
Murloc's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Bern
Posts: 288
Groaned at 2 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 273 Times in 149 Posts
Murloc is considered knowledgeableMurloc is considered knowledgeableMurloc is considered knowledgeable
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

hard choice if you don't know what the cause is, he might react worse or better in public school.

If you're staying for a long time in Switzerland, you might have to consider his post-obligatory schooling too.

Kids with that sort of issues IME eventually did manage to do an apprenticeship, maybe after some struggles (there is a post-obligatory school for kids who haven't found a place e.g. due to language issues, the system tries to not leave kids at home doing nothing after compulsory school ends). They can go back to studying later if they grow out of it. There are several bridges to go do whatever it is you wanted to do.
This flexibility and early exit from full-time school is given by being integrated in the public school system though, because otherwise you don't really learn german.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Murloc for this useful post:
  #32  
Old 16.12.2019, 00:30
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Singapore
Posts: 6
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 10 Times in 4 Posts
Moving has no particular reputation at present
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Thank you so much, everybody. I am so grateful for how helpful everyone is being.

I am not sure which area we will live in but will read all the links posted and look into the school integration class support.

Thank you!!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Moving for this useful post:
  #33  
Old 16.12.2019, 01:38
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,011
Groaned at 217 Times in 184 Posts
Thanked 21,300 Times in 9,060 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Are the child's behavioural problems specifically connected to school or are they generally connected to socialization in a broader sense?

I believe many otherwise capable children struggle with the way many schools focus strongly on the learning and repeating of a set syllabus rather than thinking for themselves and finding their own answers. Sometimes frustration can turn into aggression. If this is the case, of course you cannot change the system but a first step is to recognize that and seek out a school accordingly. Maybe one solution is something like a Steiner or Montessori school that places less emphasis on academic performance and more on holistic development. OTOH for some kids this can make things even worse so you need to observe carefully rather than just expecting the school to sort everything out. Every kid is different and there isn't a one size fits all solution.

If the problem is more generally with any form of socialization outside the home, then maybe it would be good to work on that. Maybe being put into a team sport activity outside of school might foster team thinking and socialization while channeling excess energy and aggression into something positive, or maybe some artistic or musical coaching can provide the child a means to live out its creativity, depending of course on the child's character, ability and inclinations.

Last edited by amogles; 16.12.2019 at 01:50.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank amogles for this useful post:
  #34  
Old 16.12.2019, 09:29
NotAllThere's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Baselland
Posts: 11,389
Groaned at 170 Times in 147 Posts
Thanked 16,211 Times in 6,599 Posts
NotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Going into the Swiss system age 12 means forget going straight from school to university. But... I've met kids who came here age 12 or 13, went into local school, got an apprenticeship at 16 and are doing fine. After an apprenticeship, they can do a passarelle (spelling?) and go to university, or do a berufsmatura and do a degree at fachhochsschule .
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank NotAllThere for this useful post:
  #35  
Old 16.12.2019, 09:36
kri's Avatar
kri kri is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Currently not in Switzerland
Posts: 1,132
Groaned at 11 Times in 11 Posts
Thanked 739 Times in 412 Posts
kri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
Going into the Swiss system age 12 means forget going straight from school to university. But... I've met kids who came here age 12 or 13, went into local school, got an apprenticeship at 16 and are doing fine. After an apprenticeship, they can do a passarelle (spelling?) and go to university, or do a berufsmatura and do a degree at fachhochsschule .
You make it sound as if it is a done deal and it is not. The child might repeat 6th grade (1 yr lost with peers) then go to secondary school, perhaps for 3 years, and then do the Gymnasium entry exam. If passed, it is onto Short Gymnasium and uni.

Indeed this would require a lot of hard work and study but it is not a done deal that going straight to Uni from school is not possible.

Last edited by kri; 16.12.2019 at 09:56.
Reply With Quote
The following 5 users would like to thank kri for this useful post:
  #36  
Old 16.12.2019, 09:40
Tilia's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: ZH
Posts: 2,754
Groaned at 81 Times in 45 Posts
Thanked 2,639 Times in 1,186 Posts
Tilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

That isn't true at all! I know of quite a few cases where kids have gone onto Gymi after arriving at 12 (or later!) with limited or no German knowledge.


Quote:
View Post
Going into the Swiss system age 12 means forget going straight from school to university. But... I've met kids who came here age 12 or 13, went into local school, got an apprenticeship at 16 and are doing fine. After an apprenticeship, they can do a passarelle (spelling?) and go to university, or do a berufsmatura and do a degree at fachhochsschule .
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Tilia for this useful post:
  #37  
Old 16.12.2019, 09:52
MusicChick's Avatar
modified, reprogrammed and doctored²
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 13,494
Groaned at 203 Times in 159 Posts
Thanked 15,769 Times in 8,054 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
You make it sound as if it is a done deal and it is not. The child might repeat 6th grade (1 yr lost with peers) then go to secondary school, perhaps for 3 years, and then do the Gymnasium entry exam. If passed, it is onto Short Gymnasium and uni.

Indeed this would require a lot of hard work and study but it is not a done deal that it is not possible.
Nothing is done deal here and it puts a lot of responsibility on the child himself. If indeed OP's child is acting out because he feels that he lives for other people's priorities, the local system would be good. We have the network to help in case there are other reasons for behavioral issues. It is hard to know what's up just from a few OP's post and I don't blame her for not oversharing.

Kids need attention and trust. Steiner and Montessori work also because parents lay off their pressure, too, and learn to trust their own kids and when to stand behind them, when/if to seek diagnosis and when to let go.

What I appreciate about OP's child is the fact that he's able, despite the behavior issues, to perform academically. That's an achievement. Maybe he is really bored at school?
__________________
"L'homme ne peut pas remplacer son coeur avec sa tete, ni sa tete avec ses mains." J.H. Pestalozzi

"It is on this knowledge of the heart and of the instincts that reason must establish itself and create the foundation for all its discourse." B. Pascal
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank MusicChick for this useful post:
  #38  
Old 16.12.2019, 09:54
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 8,503
Groaned at 271 Times in 220 Posts
Thanked 11,274 Times in 5,980 Posts
greenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
That isn't true at all! I know of quite a few cases where kids have gone onto Gymi after arriving at 12 (or later!) with limited or no German knowledge.
I know one who is a writer now (of German language) and another one who was my German language teacher for a little while.
Don't know if these examples are relevant for the OP though. Kids have different linguistic abilities and....interests. IMHO, the child has already some difficulties with adjustment in a group, hence inability to communicate, even temporary, might add to his general frustrations. Maybe a bilingual school, why not. Quite a few of them in Zurich and around.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 16.12.2019, 09:55
kri's Avatar
kri kri is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Currently not in Switzerland
Posts: 1,132
Groaned at 11 Times in 11 Posts
Thanked 739 Times in 412 Posts
kri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond reputekri has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
Nothing is done deal here and it puts a lot of responsibility on the child himself. Nothing is given here. If indeed OP's child is acting out because he feels that he lives for other people's priorities, the local system would be good. We have the network to help in case there are other reasons for behavioral issues. It is hard to know what's up just from a few OP's post and I don't blame her for not oversharing.

Kids need attention and trust. Steiner and Montessori work also because parents lay off their pressure, too, and learn to trust their own kids and when to stand behind them, when/if to seek diagnosis and when to let go.

What I appreciate about OP's child is the fact that he's able, despite the behavior issues, to perform academically. That's really not given either. Maybe he is really bored at school?
Yep - am with you on this one and was referring tot he post that would exclude the possibility of Uni which IMHO is not to be excluded at this stage or make it sound like a done deal.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank kri for this useful post:
  #40  
Old 16.12.2019, 10:06
MusicChick's Avatar
modified, reprogrammed and doctored²
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 13,494
Groaned at 203 Times in 159 Posts
Thanked 15,769 Times in 8,054 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What if my child is kicked out of his international school due to behaviour?

Quote:
View Post
Yep - am with you on this one and was referring tot he post that would exclude the possibility of Uni which IMHO is not to be excluded at this stage or make it sound like a done deal.
There is a lot of leeway in the system to integrate people in, even at 20 or 25 should they put their mind to it.

Another thing is, home environment often makes kids act up. Or culture that they don't feel that they belong to. Authority, discipline, robotic stuff. And then - adolescence hits poor kids now so early, too. How much time does he spend on screens? How much decision making is he envolved in..is he being infantilized? These things cannot be delegated onto specialists, but I feel the OP needs help. One thing the local system is expecting is that parents are on board with consequential parenting.
__________________
"L'homme ne peut pas remplacer son coeur avec sa tete, ni sa tete avec ses mains." J.H. Pestalozzi

"It is on this knowledge of the heart and of the instincts that reason must establish itself and create the foundation for all its discourse." B. Pascal
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank MusicChick for this useful post:
Reply

Tags
special needs education




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
academia International School – Pre-School, Primary School, Precollege, College EF Advertising Education 0 26.11.2014 12:39
School advice needed: Montessori Rietberg vs Bilingual International School of ZH claire71 Education 0 19.01.2014 23:22
Behaviour issues in school shem Family matters/health 12 11.05.2012 23:43
Child behaviour and discipline. How do you do it? Aquanexus Family matters/health 76 04.03.2010 21:55
Child in school fight - possible injury to other child swisscath Family matters/health 16 29.05.2008 13:08


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:22.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0