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Old 13.08.2017, 00:04
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Where and how to find a low-skill job

Hello people,

I am entry level electrical engineer with about a year of swiss work experience and I am searching for a job in Switzerland for almost 8 months.So far I haven't had success with finding a job and I've sent all kinds of applications to all kinds of companies - from recruiting agencies, start-ups, small sized, mid sized, all to large sized companies and corporations.

As time is running out and as I do need money, I'm willing to accept any low skilled job, that being packaging sausages, selling groceries or gardening. It would be more convenient that the job is remotely relevant to my field, i.e. assembly line worker in electrical equipment factory.

Obviously, I've checked many popular job search engines, but they don't have the low skill jobs mentioned. The lowest it gets and somewhat relevant to my field is electrician/ electrical technician, but again, one needs experience for this as well.

Advises welcomed.
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  #2  
Old 13.08.2017, 01:21
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

As usual, most important questions first:
1a) what permit do you have? and/or 1b) what nationality do you have?
2) what local languages do you speak and to what level?
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  #3  
Old 13.08.2017, 11:52
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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As usual, most important questions first:
1a) what permit do you have? and/or 1b) what nationality do you have?
2) what local languages do you speak and to what level?
1a) none
1b) eu27 citizen, therefore eligible for work permit issue
2) german A2
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:06
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

I'm by no means an expert on employment in CH since I don't have a work visa... however my Swiss boyfriend told me that a large amount of work in Switzerland is done through temporary agencies, and from talking with a few of his friends it seems as though that's how they all get work for weeks or months at a time and then are sent to new places or hired by the companies they temp at (mostly factory work, moving, warehouse stuff, HVAC mechanic, etc.).

Perhaps there is some info online as to where you can find a temporary agency (which may the same as an employment agency)? My understanding is that each profession has a different agency so finding one that specializes in something relevant to you would be super cool.
FWIW, my boyfriend also said that when he went to a new agency they very much appreciated that he took the time to go to them in person to give them his paperwork...
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:18
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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I'm by no means an expert on employment in CH since I don't have a work visa... however my Swiss boyfriend told me that a large amount of work in Switzerland is done through temporary agencies, and from talking with a few of his friends it seems as though that's how they all get work for weeks or months at a time and then are sent to new places or hired by the companies they temp at (mostly factory work, moving, warehouse stuff, HVAC mechanic, etc.).

Perhaps there is some info online as to where you can find a temporary agency (which may the same as an employment agency)? My understanding is that each profession has a different agency so finding one that specializes in something relevant to you would be super cool.
FWIW, my boyfriend also said that when he went to a new agency they very much appreciated that he took the time to go to them in person to give them his paperwork...
temporar was the first thing I have tried. Of course, trying temporar as entry level electrical engineer sounds a bit unrealistic as such positions are usually meant for highly experienced contractors (consultants), but I've also tried applying for HVAC & warehouse stuff and no luck.
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:24
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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1a) none
1b) eu27 citizen, therefore eligible for work permit issue
2) german A2
Just for clarification please...

Are you currently residing in Switzerland?
How long have you been here?
You say you don't have a permit?
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:27
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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Just for clarification please...

Are you currently residing in Switzerland? No. I quit, as my money was draining fast and there was no job on sight.
How long have you been here?almost a year.
You say you don't have a permit?No.
.............
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:29
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

Did you tried in the maintence department of a hotel or as a steward ?
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:35
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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Did you tried in the maintence department of a hotel or as a steward ?
Nope. If you know for some interesting places, please let me know.

Also, how much can I expect to be paid as a factory worker, maintenance crew or other low skilled jobs? What's the salary bracket for these professions? Is it normal to get paid CHF 3500-4000?
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:39
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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1b) eu27 citizen, therefore eligible for work permit issue
As you haven't given your nationality, I think you need to read this page in full...

https://www.ch.ch/en/working-switzerland-eu-efta/

...and take note of this...

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Priority given to Swiss nationals (preference given to Swiss and foreign nationals who are already on the Swiss labour market)
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:44
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

Even a dishwasher (entry Level) makes around 3600sfr /month x 13 before tax/gross
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:52
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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2) german A2
Then don't expect to find a low skilled job as 99% need German and a B permit. I would imagine either cleaning, or bar work in an Irish pub are your only realistic options.
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:56
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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As you haven't given your nationality, I think you need to read this page in full...

https://www.ch.ch/en/working-switzerland-eu-efta/

...and take note of this...
Well, I'm aware of all that stuff - as EU25 I'm able to work for 3 months without the need of work permit, while for anything more than that I have to obtain it.

Also, I was residing in CH for 3 months as a job seeker and it didn't make much difference, except to my wallet.

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Even a dishwasher (entry Level) makes around 3600sfr /month x 13 before tax/gross
That sounds quite a lot actually, in comparison to how much interns are paid. Must be even a larger sum for a Senior dishwasher
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Old 13.08.2017, 12:57
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

Is your entry level a Swiss recognised level?
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Old 13.08.2017, 13:04
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

You say you have about a year's work experience in Switzerland - how did you get that?

Since lack of experience in your field seems to be the problem you're hitting find a job in your home country and get some. Or try another EU country to get a job in. Why the fixation on Switzerland?

And yes, more and more priority is being given to people who already have a Swiss permit to live and work here. Employers are going to try and hire these people first because that's the whole idea of the priority. It's the Swiss government's way to avoid having to impose permit quota limits on EU nationals as per the vote to curb immigration from the EU back in 2014. So it's no longer a case of just arriving and finding any job even if you don't speak the language. Improve your German, gain some experience in your field and then try again.
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Old 13.08.2017, 13:11
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Is your entry level a Swiss recognised level?
If you mean my education - I did the masters, but outside of CH and it should be recognised by CH. If it wasn't I would probably never land an internship in Switzerland, especially at a such reputable employer.

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You say you have about a year's work experience in Switzerland - how did you get that?
It was an internship.

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Since lack of experience in your field seems to be the problem you're hitting find a job in your home country and get some. Or try another EU country to get a job in. Why the fixation on Switzerland?
Currently I am employed, while not in my home country, but in some other EU country. The amount of bucks I earn here is not that good, but not that bad either, but in any case it's laughable in comparison to what an entry level engineer earns in CH. This is why I want to return to Switzerland. It's kind of a heaven to fill your pocket with money, especially if you don't have family.

Secondly, I miss swiss lifestyle. 10/10 infrastructure, 10/10 safety (in current location I have already been robbed, mugged and beaten), 10/10 clean environment, 10/10 location (italy, germany, france and austria in front of your nose, for everything else there is well connected ZH airport)

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And yes, more and more priority is being given to people who already have a Swiss permit to live and work here. Employers are going to try and hire these people first because that's the whole idea of the priority. It's the Swiss government's way to avoid having to impose permit quota limits on EU nationals as per the vote to curb immigration from the EU back in 2014. So it's no longer a case of just arriving and finding any job even if you don't speak the language. Improve your German, gain some experience in your field and then try again.
oh well...

Last edited by 3Wishes; 13.08.2017 at 15:56. Reason: merging consecutive replies
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Old 13.08.2017, 14:10
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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Currently I am employed, while not in my home country, but in some other EU country. The amount of bucks I earn here is not that good, but not that bad either, but in any case it's laughable in comparison to what an entry level engineer earns in CH. This is why I want to return to Switzerland. It's kind of a heaven to fill your pocket with money, especially if you don't have family.
Uhm yeah. That is not a simplified viewpoint at all...

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2) german A2
Not enough for most low-skilled jobs either. Certainly none with any client/customer focus.

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as EU25 I'm able to work for 3 months without the need of work permit
No!! You always need a permit - the process is just simpler and different and a "Meldeverfahren" is sufficient for employments < 3 months. You're not getting a physical permit, but you absolutely do have to register the employment. Meaning: no you can't show up and take a random job and never tell any authority about it, that would be illegal.

**

Saying preference has to be given to Swiss is maybe true on paper. In reality, not really relevant. Meaning: that is not your problem. However, clearly you've tried for long enough so either something is wrong in your CV or in the way you present yourself. Low-skilled jobs can indeed often be found through agencies (Manpower, Adecco, Kelly), so you can try signing up with them and give it a shot this way.

However, you may simply want to get past your Switzerland-obsession and focus on the fact that you DO have a job elsewhere that seems to be even related to your degree, and will likely be better off keeping that instead of scrubbing toilets in another country just for the sake of it.
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Old 13.08.2017, 14:45
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

Agreed, you can't turn up and work here for 3 months without a permit. Always it's either have a permit or you come under the short term working notification system, BUT this is only for posted workers from EU companies to Switzerland, self-employed people based in another EU country who come over to do work here for some reason or Swiss companies bringing in temp workers for less than 90 days a year.

"The Agreement on the Free Movement of Persons (AFMP) between Switzerland and the EU is aimed at liberalising the cross-border provision of services (posted workers or self-employed service providers) for up to 90 effective working days per calendar year. All that is required is prior submission of a notification form. The 90 working days per calendar year rule are calculated both for the company posting workers and for the posted worker.

The online notification procedure also applies to companies based in Switzerland that would like to employ foreign workers for periods of up to three months. All that is required is submission of a notification form. If the intention is to employ a worker for longer than three months, then this person must request a Swiss residence permit or must satisfy the requirements for issuance of a cross-border commuter permit."

https://www.sem.admin.ch/sem/en/home...verfahren.html
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Old 13.08.2017, 15:39
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

I am also jobless since March as I am not perfect in speaking German. I believe, I wouldn't have left any job offer Page without applying to it but received negative replies.
You really have to improve your skills in German at least up to B2 no matter how strong other skills you have.
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Old 13.08.2017, 17:16
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Re: Where and how to find a low-skill job

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Hello people,

I am entry level electrical engineer with about a year of swiss work experience and I am searching for a job in Switzerland for almost 8 months.So far I haven't had success with finding a job and I've sent all kinds of applications to all kinds of companies - from recruiting agencies, start-ups, small sized, mid sized, all to large sized companies and corporations.
You've a non-Swiss education is a field that mostly needs practical experience. Your 1-year Praktikum, while helpful, isn't what employees REALLY want. And if there is competition, you'll not stand much of a chance. Honestly, if I, as a Swiss employeer, would get your CV and that one from a person having done a 4-year Swiss apprenticeship, the person with the apprenticeship would get the job.. and then we still have the issue that your language skills are far from being adequate for such a job.

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As time is running out and as I do need money, I'm willing to accept any low skilled job, that being packaging sausages, selling groceries or gardening. It would be more convenient that the job is remotely relevant to my field, i.e. assembly line worker in electrical equipment factory.
You're listing jobs which ALL require/have available apprenticeships.

Metzger, Fleischfachverkäufer, Detailhandelverkäufer, Gärtner - those are all jobs where you'll be competing with people actually having work experience. And with wages in all these areas being relatively low, they won't hire you just because you're 10% cheaper (but much less productive, since you're lacking experience AND language)

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Obviously, I've checked many popular job search engines, but they don't have the low skill jobs mentioned. The lowest it gets and somewhat relevant to my field is electrician/ electrical technician, but again, one needs experience for this as well.

Advises welcomed.
Honest advise?

If no one wants someone with your skills in Switzerland, go to your home country, and find a job there. With some years of work experience (+improved German, I'd suggest B2 level before you try again), you can try to apply again, if you really want to have a job here.

Right now, being unemployed for almost a year will just lower your chances of getting a proper job by the minute.
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