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Old 15.01.2011, 18:43
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

Do you mean 'ready'made' porridge? All the shops here sell big bags of oats (flocons d'avoine/Haferflockschen) so I am surprised you can't find them. I bring my large oats from the UK as they are difficult to find (I finally found some at a bio shop in Neuchatel) and very expensive. Large oats release less starch so have a much lower GI (glycemic index- speed of starch=sugar absorption). Most ready made cereals attractive to kids are laden with sugar sadly.

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What if parents could give their children a magic pill in the morning to make them healthy, smart and well-behaved? This pill would undoubtedly be flying off the shelf of the local pharmacy. While there is no such medication, there is something just as powerful: breakfast. Consumption of this morning meal is one of the most important things a child does all day. Over 30 years of credible research has proven that a healthy breakfast positively impacts brain function and energy level, which is extremely important for school-aged children.


Benefits of breakfast

The following are key reasons why breakfast should be made a priority for every child:
Breakfast equals better behavior

Children who skip breakfast are more tired, irritable, or restless by late morning. These [COLOR=blue ! important][COLOR=blue ! important]symptoms[/COLOR][/COLOR] lead to aggressive behavior that causes children to get in trouble in school. Children who regularly eat a morning meal have more energy, are less likely to exhibit aggressive behavior, and have a better attitude toward school.
Breakfast leads to higher test scores

A study published in 1998 in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine showed significantly higher math test scores after children ate breakfast. This and other research has clearly shown that children who consistently eat breakfast test higher in most academic areas. (See also Brain Food for Kids.)
Eating breakfast led to better class attendance

Children who eat breakfast are absent from school fewer days. They also spend less time in the nurse's office complaining of stomach [COLOR=blue ! important][COLOR=blue ! important]pains[/COLOR][/COLOR]. Ironic as it may be, children who claim they don't eat breakfast due to a lack of time in the morning are tardy more often than those who take time for a morning meal.
More nutritious intake by eating breakfast

Breakfast eaters generally meet vitamin and mineral requirements for prevention of deficiencies. They consume more fiber, vitamin C, calcium and folic acid. Unfortunately, children who miss breakfast do not make up for lost nutrients later in the day.
Eating breakfast helps weight control

Eating breakfast helps to establish a normal eating pattern. Eating regular meals and snacks is a key to maintaining a healthy weight throughout life. Increasing childhood obesity is in part attributed to the disappearance of normal eating patterns in many of today's households.
Why do some children still resist breakfast?

Given the abundance of compelling information on the benefits of breakfast consumption, why does one out of eight school children start the day without eating breakfast? Some are not encouraged to do so by their parents, while others make arguments for avoiding breakfast. Some common arguments are lack of time, absence of hunger, and distaste for breakfast foods. No matter what the barrier, parents can and should find a way around them.
Creating healthy habits in your children

Here are some tips for parents on incorporating breakfast into their children's before-school routines:
  • Prepare for school the night before by preparing the next day's clothes, lunch and backpack.
  • Set the alarm for 15 minutes earlier to allow more time for breakfast.
  • Say no to TV, video games and computers in the morning.
  • Choose foods that require little preparation such as fresh and canned fruits, milk, yogurt, cheese, cottage cheese, hard-boiled eggs, whole grain cereals or instant oatmeal.
  • Eat on the run with celery stuffed with peanut butter or cream cheese, dried fruits, string cheese, juice boxes, milk cartons, or breakfast bars.
  • For those with little hunger in the morning, offer juice, milk or a fruit smoothie made with skim milk and fruit.
  • For those who dislike breakfast foods, offer something non-traditional like cold pizza or leftover chicken.
Set a good example to your children: eat breakfast yourself

Children imitate the behavior of adults, so if they don't see their parents eating breakfast, they are likely to resist themselves. Children are not only more likely to eat breakfast themselves if they see their parents eating breakfast each morning, they are also more likely to develop healthier eating habits overall. Parents can encourage their children to eat breakfast by having

Last edited by Odile; 15.01.2011 at 19:01.
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  #102  
Old 15.01.2011, 19:05
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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Do you mean 'ready'made' porridge? All the shops here sell big bags of oats (flocons d'avoine/Haferflockschen) so I am surprised you can't find them. I bring my large oats from the UK as they are difficult to find (I finally found some at a bio shop in Neuchatel) and very expensive. Large oats release less starch so have a much lower GI (glycemic index- speed of starch=sugar absorption). Most ready made cereals attractive to kids are laden with sugar sadly.
Hi, I can't speak German so i've been struggling in the shops
I'm not sure what you mean by ready-made porridge. The stuff I buy is dry rolled oats. I also don't know what 'large oats' means?
I'm looking for rolled oats.

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Thanks in advance
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Old 15.01.2011, 19:12
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

In the UK you can buy small packs for the Microwave of very fine ground porridge - often including a lot of sugar. There you can buy 2 sorts of rolled outs, small and large (sometimes called Old fashioned rolled oats). At Tesco the large ones are sold in black/green soft bags. The small 'normal' oats can be found here at Migros and Coop, and are very reasonable in price - called 'flocons d'avoine in French, and Haferflocken in German.

Because I have Type 2 diabetes, controlled by diet and lots of exercise, it is best I have the large oats - as explained in my previous post (lower GI).
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Old 15.01.2011, 19:32
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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In the UK you can buy small packs for the Microwave of very fine ground porridge - often including a lot of sugar. There you can buy 2 sorts of rolled outs, small and large (sometimes called Old fashioned rolled oats). At Tesco the large ones are sold in black/green soft bags. The small 'normal' oats can be found here at Migros and Coop, and are very reasonable in price - called 'flocons d'avoine in French, and Haferflocken in German.

Because I have Type 2 diabetes, controlled by diet and lots of exercise, it is best I have the large oats - as explained in my previous post (lower GI).
And do the large oats look like my picture? You just boil them up in water or milk yes?
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Old 15.01.2011, 19:43
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

Yes - but you do the same with the smaller ones too. The only difference is the starch release and consistency. The smaller ones are fine for kids - but the GI is lower for the larger ones
(perhaps a comparison would be the difference between short grain rice and basmati - basmati has less starch (and starch turns into sugar in the body) so is lower GI and better for diabetics (like new potatoes better than old pots).
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Old 15.01.2011, 20:09
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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And do the large oats look like my picture? You just boil them up in water or milk yes?
Proper oatmeal needs about 45 mins of cooking to allow the oatmeal to swell up. One part oats to 3 parts water and 1 part milk
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Old 15.01.2011, 20:42
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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There is absolutely no nutritional value in boxed cereals and it fact you would be better off eating the box instead.

I hope the link to the article below works to show my reasons for saying this

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2...icity-lawrence

I start the day with protein rather than a ton of highly processed grains and sugars. Scrambled egg with nuts and berries is a good option. Quinoa is far healthier than oatmeal and you can make it in a saucepan the same way as you would oatmeal.
Ugh. Okay, now to convince the young lady to eat cardboard for breakfast...and here I thought I was doing well just by having her eat something...
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Old 15.01.2011, 20:43
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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Respect

The reason why I asked is that I'd rather take notice of someone, when diet is discussed, who has an active lifestyle rather than an over-weight couch potato who took no exercise at all.

If a diet* works then it's worth looking into.

*diet rather than slimming diet.
Tom, what about normal BMI couch potatoes?
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Old 15.01.2011, 21:06
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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Yes - but you do the same with the smaller ones too. The only difference is the starch release and consistency. The smaller ones are fine for kids - but the GI is lower for the larger ones
(perhaps a comparison would be the difference between short grain rice and basmati - basmati has less starch (and starch turns into sugar in the body) so is lower GI and better for diabetics (like new potatoes better than old pots).
Odile,

I agree competely with you on the importance of eating foods with a lower glycemic index.

Link to the Mendosa GI webpage. From there you can get to a list of GI of various foods

http://www.mendosa.com/gi.htm
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Old 15.01.2011, 21:23
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

I let mine eat cake.




(actually Miss Picky-Noneater will, with persuasion, eat a variety ranging from toast with cream cheese to hot dogs to mozzarella sticks to cereal, yogurt at times, pancakes and waffles on weekends, and when that fails I can always get a Coop chocolate pudding in her. gotta do whatcha gotta do)
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Old 16.01.2011, 00:26
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

Ahh... this old clip comes to mind:





Meanwhile, as much as Tom disparages the input of overweight couch potatoes when it comes to eating habits (), I can offer these insights:

ALL of the nutritionists I've ever seen have said that eating breakfast is the very most important thing to do. WHAT you eat is of slightly less importance than simply eating. The reasoning given was that you need to "wake up" your metabolism. If you fail to eat breakfast, your body is more likely to store energy (as fat) rather than using it.

Of course, plenty of folks argue - if not directly and not in a timely fashion, 10, 20 years or more down the line, someone, somewhere, has a different opinion of what is "healthy eating." (As example, recent articles have been a lot of "oops, eggs have GOOD cholesterol, not BAD cholesterol in them after all" and things of similar nature.)

So, the main things to keep in mind for breakfast are to have some protein (milk, cheeses, yogurt), some healthy fats (again dairy, eggs, legumes including peanuts), fiber, carbs to burn. The nutritionist I saw here had no issue with me having ovomaltine first thing, followed by another "meal" an hour or two later consisting of yogurt, fruit and a slice of toast.


With this basic idea in mind, one of the suggestions I'd have is to make some oatmeal cookies with yogurt covered raisins and / or cranberries and other chopped fruit as well as nuts in them. They can be stored for a while, they can be frozen and popped in the oven or microwave to thaw / heat if you like, and depending on the recipe and the ingredients used, they can be as "healthy" as you want them to be. Best of all... they can be taken with you together with a cup of your favorite morning beverage when you leave for work or school.

There are recipes available for drying fruit, coating them with yogurt, making peanut-butter chips and all sorts of goodies (which again, depending on recipe CAN be pretty "healthy") that you could mix in with the oatmeal to make the cookies - or stir into a pan to make hot cereal on days when there is a bit more time.
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Old 16.01.2011, 00:38
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

Tub of ice cream, peanut butter and 500gm bread sets me up nicely.
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Old 16.01.2011, 01:01
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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How long does it take for your kids to eat these breakfasts in the morning?

I have to admit that we don't have breakfast in the morning apart from weekend. I would have to wake up my kids at least 45 minute earlier for breakfast as experience have shown that they are not hungry straight out of bed. I consider the snack they get later in the morning to be their breakfast. We have tried to introduce cereals ( something I never had myself ) and my older is very picky on the kind of cereals she likes Also I get frustrated because of the few times they ask for a bowl of cereals or a toast they hardly touch them . I don't force them to eat as I suffered myself too much having to stuff myself and finish my plate when I was not hungry anymore. And of course, we are bad example unlike the OP who is trying to change her habits for the sake of her kids.
But as I work out 4 times a week apart from wednesday, I don't do breakfast these mornings.
My 4yo is pretty hungry in the mornings so time is not much of an issue but choice is. When he is going through one of his fussy times we ask him the night before (also what he wants to wear - within reason) and often get him to help us prepare it before he goes to bed. Bircher museli or porrige normally which is quicker soaked overnight, or weetbix gets put in his bowl ready for him to add milk, you chose it you eat it NOW!! Saves a few minutes and a lot of tantrums. Bircher museli with plain yogurt and a splash of syrup or cordial (we use Volg rasberry, lower in sugar and stronger taste) is great for kids to make as they stir it it gets stripes and then changes colour. Kids will eat what they make, even if it is jam and salami sandwiches - which he loves!! "Can I make one for you dad?" "Errr no thanks!!"
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Old 16.01.2011, 09:36
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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Ahh... this old clip comes to mind:





Meanwhile, as much as Tom disparages the input of overweight couch potatoes when it comes to eating habits (), I can offer these insights:

ALL of the nutritionists I've ever seen have said that eating breakfast is the very most important thing to do. WHAT you eat is of slightly less importance than simply eating. The reasoning given was that you need to "wake up" your metabolism. If you fail to eat breakfast, your body is more likely to store energy (as fat) rather than using it.

.
I absolutely agree with you here. It's important for everyone and not just children and really sets you up for the day.

The number of people I know who don't have breakfast as they think it's doing them some good and then they pig out on doughnuts etc at 10 O'clock is amazing.
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Old 16.01.2011, 09:45
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

You can buy those in Coop. And making porridge from regular oats takes about 5 minutes - in answer to those above looking for microwave stuff.

Cheers,
Nick

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Hi, I can't speak German so i've been struggling in the shops
I'm not sure what you mean by ready-made porridge. The stuff I buy is dry rolled oats. I also don't know what 'large oats' means?
I'm looking for rolled oats.

Like this:


Thanks in advance
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Old 16.01.2011, 09:58
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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I have to admit that we don't have breakfast in the morning apart from weekend. I would have to wake up my kids at least 45 minute earlier for breakfast as experience have shown that they are not hungry straight out of bed. I consider the snack they get later in the morning to be their breakfast. We have tried to introduce cereals ( something I never had myself ) and my older is very picky on the kind of cereals she likes Also I get frustrated because of the few times they ask for a bowl of cereals or a toast they hardly touch them . I don't force them to eat as I suffered myself too much having to stuff myself and finish my plate when I was not hungry anymore. And of course, we are bad example unlike the OP who is trying to change her habits for the sake of her kids.
But as I work out 4 times a week apart from wednesday, I don't do breakfast these mornings.
I think I would be careful getting kids used to skipping breakfast, since that what they will consider a norm, later on. Loads of people who have weight troubles later in life skip breakfast, it seems. I understand it is hectic in the morning, but it is easy to condition kids to actually start having some appetite and slowly get used to the idea of people sitting down with them for a min in the morning and all eating. A bite or two at first, some fruits and a sip of drink, than, later on, 1/3 of a toast, few spoons of something gooey and sweet, some fiber...It's all about family habits, it is not about being forced to eat. My child has never eaten much, but I know you can waken appetite with a sip of OJ right when they wake up, warm milk or warm chocolate milk. Fresh fruits are great, I started with a few berries, blue berries or sliced strawberry, a few pieces of peeled apple(later on switch to apple bits with peel). I got used to serving our princess in a tiny china for her dolls, she is a lot more likely to eat it, it is fun. I taught her how to make her own tea, with milk and honey or sugar. I've always diluted her fruit juice, she likes to have two little pitchers to do it herself now. I make myself eat things in front of her that aren't my favorites but are healthy and she needs to see a grown up with a healthy food habit. Same goes for drinks and pretty much anything else. If it works well, breakfast is a nice little moment with your kids.

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Unfortunately I'm a breakfast Nazi in the mornings...
Me too, always been. Pretty much all the other family meals, too. It is important, though. Kids need to get used to the idea, not just shove them a cheese stick in the car on the way to a creche.
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Old 16.01.2011, 18:42
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

My kids go through breakfast phases where they eat the same meal every weekday morning for months, then suddenly switch. At the moment, they're on a porridge jag - I use the small oats as mentioned by Odile above, which take just a few mins in the micro (1 part oats to 2 parts milk - an expresso cup does a one person portion - then zap for a minute, stir, minute, stir, repeat until the right texture. Use a large jug, it bubbles up a LOT).

They have this topped with a drizzle of syrup and chopped bananas/ dried apricots.

Other times, they have toast, mostly with peanut butter on it.

Sometimes, I go all chef-like on them and produce what they call 'hotel breakfast' - a selection of Greek yog/ honey/ nuts, pancakes, salami, fruit salad, etc. The yog - quite often. The full range of stuff - not so much.

We don't all sit down like a 1950s family, though. The kids have different start times (7.40am / 8.30am), so don't always eat at the same time. They're quite chatty kids, so I find they actually eat more quickly and effectively if I plonk them in front of the TV and let them shovel mindlessly. None of us are hugely keen about interacting very first thing in the morning - we make up for it later, though!

And I'm also a big convert to protein rather than carbs for breakfast. I have an active lifestyle (no car, so shopping is via cycle with trailer, micro scooter to school and back, etc) and find that if I just eat cereal for breakfast then I have a massive carb crash at almost exactly 11am - a 'am I going to make it home on the bike because I'm so weak and trembly' crash. Whereas if I scramble a couple of eggs and eat those then I'm good to go for the entire morning, and only looking for something light and salady for lunch.

I do eat some carbs, although not much, and try to make sure they're eaten with protein which seems to iron out the extremes. Mostly for me, though, breakfast is Greek yog/Splenda/nuts, eggs and sometimes bacon, or a Continental salami-cheese-fruit plate.
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Old 16.01.2011, 19:03
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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I absolutely agree with you here. It's important for everyone and not just children and really sets you up for the day.

The number of people I know who don't have breakfast as they think it's doing them some good and then they pig out on doughnuts etc at 10 O'clock is amazing.
Hmmm, I don't eat breakfast, lunch, nor snacks. Just dinner.

Tom
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Old 16.01.2011, 21:01
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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Hmmm, I don't eat breakfast, lunch, nor snacks. Just dinner.

Tom
same here, but the other way around.

But for my kid.. that's a different ball game all together. I fully agree with Odile, healthy breakfast is very important for children. It's always a discussion because mine isn't naturally hungry before 9 - 9.30, but I refuse to let him go to school without a decent breakfast.

The brain needs carbs and energy to function correctly.
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Old 16.01.2011, 23:16
 
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Re: breakfast for kids-what do you do?

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You can buy those in Coop. And making porridge from regular oats takes about 5 minutes - in answer to those above looking for microwave stuff.

Cheers,
Nick

I bought some oats (avena?) from co-op, and nuked them in the microwave with milk for 3 minutes but they were still tough like cardboard, and the milk hadn't gone even remotely creamy like it does with the oats I used in the UK.

So, was it just that I needed to nuke them for longer?

I'm desperate to be able to make porridge like back in the UK as my three year old has eaten it with fruit since forever, and I'm tired of using my suitcase weight limit on trips back there briging back kgs of porridge!
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