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  #21  
Old 23.02.2012, 22:22
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Re: International Schools

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The debate is not between international and local, but between private and official instead.

Difficult to find work in CH, Germany, France, Italy e.g. with their diplomas.
Just the IB diploma is not enough for most jobs around. But I don't see my kids having an IB worth more or less then a Dutch High school diploma for example.Most colleges around the world accept the IB program. If we stay the full 5 years our oldest will be done with high school and hopefully of to the Dutch college she wants.
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  #22  
Old 23.02.2012, 22:52
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Re: International Schools

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Difficult to find work in CH, Germany, France, Italy e.g. with their diplomas.
IB diploma is a general academic one, so no profession. That's the same for all "matura" kind of diplomas nowadays.
Professional diplomas exist in most national systems, IB is not made for it. You can't blame them for a claim they don't make.

The transition IB=>University is easy if you are careful to get the right information on time. Countries have their requirements, some more logical ones, some illogical, but that's life and it's all about knowing in advance to act accordingly and succeed (subject choices, for example, is crucial).
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  #23  
Old 24.02.2012, 13:12
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Re: International Schools

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IB diploma is a general academic one, so no profession. That's the same for all "matura" kind of diplomas nowadays.
...
I don't agree on this. Outside CH (that is an exception in this matter) matura is good for getting jobs and for further academic career.


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The transition IB=>University is easy if you are careful to get the right information on time. Countries have their requirements, some more logical ones, some illogical, but that's life and it's all about knowing in advance to act accordingly and succeed (subject choices, for example, is crucial).
Right; but normally with official maturas no problem. The IB accepting university list (of the link Astrid posted) however is not long in several countries (Germany, Italy, ...). Again CH seems to be an exception, along with NL. But does all the rest not count?
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  #24  
Old 24.02.2012, 16:41
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Re: International Schools

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I don't agree on this. Outside CH (that is an exception in this matter) matura is good for getting jobs and for further academic career.
I think you misunderstand. The matura, like A Levels, The Bac Francais, the IBDP, etc. etc. is an academic qualification. Of course, you can obtain a job by virtue of having this qualification but it is not a professional qualification ( being, as it is, a high school leaving certificate in essence ).




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Right; but normally with official maturas no problem. The IB accepting university list (of the link Astrid posted) however is not long in several countries (Germany, Italy, ...). Again CH seems to be an exception, along with NL. But does all the rest not count?
The IB is accepted by every country in the world. Certain countries have additional requirements. Germany requires Maths SL and a science at HL. Switzerland is pretty much the same. This is not a negation of the IBDP but a desire to bring it more into line with their own national qualifications.
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  #25  
Old 24.02.2012, 21:10
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Re: International Schools

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I think you misunderstand. The matura, like A Levels, The Bac Francais, the IBDP, etc. etc. is an academic qualification. Of course, you can obtain a job by virtue of having this qualification but it is not a professional qualification ( being, as it is, a high school leaving certificate in essence ).
...
I see your point.


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The IB is accepted by every country in the world. Certain countries have additional requirements. Germany requires Maths SL and a science at HL. Switzerland is pretty much the same. This is not a negation of the IBDP but a desire to bring it more into line with their own national qualifications.
OK, if I get it right it's that if a university accepts IB, there might not be any official problem.

However I do not understand why the university list in http://www.ibo.org/country/ is actually quite short (e.g. in countries like Italy and Germany), and why it should be a problem to enter the universities with national maturas (as IB suggests some extra value, that I don't see where it could be).

(Btw wikipedia sais that IB is accepted in many but not all countries. Their vision is to be accepted wordwide, but they don't seem to be. But info on wikipedia about that subject is quite vague.)
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  #26  
Old 24.02.2012, 21:18
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Re: International Schools

Take care, if you children show any signs of "learning differences". The international schools will promise you the moon, while your child is small, but drop you like a hot potato, when they reach the upper grades. This is one subject, we never considered, as our children attended 5 international schools, in four countries....sad, but true.
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  #27  
Old 24.02.2012, 22:15
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Re: International Schools

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However I do not understand why the university list in http://www.ibo.org/country/ is actually quite short
Short version: lots of possibilities indeed, but the universities set their own standards and one just need to get the requirements right in advance. This website explains it very well, actually.

Can it be that it's easier to go to UK/US university with IB rather than with Swiss matura? They probably know it better than some national systems. Just a guess. Studying in Germany of France with Swiss matura is no problem. The specifications are clear in Germany, one just has to follow them. For France, there is a special procedure for foreign students, they are used to Swiss diplomas, no problem.
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Last edited by Faltrad; 24.02.2012 at 22:28. Reason: add on.
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  #28  
Old 25.02.2012, 17:13
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Re: International Schools

Hi again,

has any of you had an experience with the lakeside school?!

Thank you
Gianna
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  #29  
Old 25.02.2012, 17:45
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Re: International Schools

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I see your point.



(Btw wikipedia sais that IB is accepted in many but not all countries. Their vision is to be accepted wordwide, but they don't seem to be. But info on wikipedia about that subject is quite vague.)
Why would you rely on wikipedia to find out if a University accepts the IB or even matura. The best option is to contact the universities you are targeting.

Wikipedia is a nice place to gather research but there are significant gaps in what is provides
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  #30  
Old 25.02.2012, 18:03
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Re: International Schools

What is the 'matura'? Are we talking about (Fr) Maturité Suisse? Both my children left high school in CH (one in public, the other in an international school) with the latter; both were accepted in universities abroad, one in Germany, the other in the UK. The 'Maturité Suisse' is considered as at a higher level than the IB. (The EPFL at Lausanne will not accept the IB as entry, and require an additional year of study).
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  #31  
Old 25.02.2012, 18:24
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Re: International Schools

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What is the 'matura'? Are we talking about (Fr) Maturité Suisse? Both my children left high school in CH (one in public, the other in an international school) with the latter; both were accepted in universities abroad, one in Germany, the other in the UK. The 'Maturité Suisse' is considered as at a higher level than the IB. (The EPFL at Lausanne will not accept the IB as entry, and require an additional year of study).
This is patently wrong, both with the level of the Swiss Maturite and the requirements of the EPFL.

This is directly from the EPFL website:

International Baccalaureate (I.B.)
Holders of an International Baccalaureate are admitted to the first year without an exam if the following conditions are fulfilled:

38 points out of 42 (without bonus points);
Higher Level (HL) in mathematics, either physics or chemistry (or biology up to and including the 2011/2012 school year) and one modern language (a language at A1 or A2 SL also counts as HL);
3 additional Standard Level (SL) branches from the following fields: natural sciences, geography, history, economics, a modern language, applied mathematics.
Candidates who do not fulfill these conditions can be admitted to the Special Mathematics Course (CMS). See Admission to CMS


The level of the mathematics in the Swiss Maturite is lower than HL but higher than SL, which is why HL is the requirement. The rest are just standard requirements as would be typical of most universities of the same standing as EPFL.

How do I know about the mathematics level? I teach mathematics and regularly meet with colleagues who teach both the IB and the Swiss Maturite, and this is their opinion.
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  #32  
Old 25.02.2012, 18:38
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Re: International Schools

Well this was a very tough decision for my husband and I but we have decided to send our daughter to one of the local schools. We only plan on being here 3-5 years but since our oldest is what you would call a 'social butterfly' we thought it best if she new the other kids in the neighborhood and we are hoping to fully intergrate into the Swiss lifestyle.

That and the fact that international schools are ridiculously expensive!!!!

Our only concern was, she only speaks English! We luckily have found a flat with a school that can and will give her 5 hours of German lessons a week and help her with her school work until she begins to understand. We also plan on starting her with German lessons before we move.

Another reason is we have a 2 year old as well who would be starting school here before moving back and there was no question about her going to a local school. This way, when little sister starts school they will both have the same schedule and can walk to school together.
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  #33  
Old 27.02.2012, 19:35
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Re: International Schools

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Reason 1 (in our case): Kids already fluent in English (besides their mother tongue Dutch)

Reason 2: Here for max 5 years, after that who knows

Reason 3: Company pays for the school
If your company pays for school - go for it , otherwise local Swiss public school just as good . I have sent my 7 years old son to 2, 3, 4 grade of public school in Canton Zuerich and then he went back to school in USA , so his math skills were much higher then other kids of his age in USA . His English spelling got a bit worst after Swiss school but he was able to learn it back and now using both German and English fluently. Unless you want your kid speak one language then fine, otherwise the only way to learn foreign language is to be tought 8 hours a day by native speakers.
Hope this helps.
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  #34  
Old 28.02.2012, 12:01
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Re: International Schools

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Just the IB diploma is not enough for most jobs around. But I don't see my kids having an IB worth more or less then a Dutch High school diploma for example.Most colleges around the world accept the IB program. If we stay the full 5 years our oldest will be done with high school and hopefully of to the Dutch college she wants.


Hi Swiss Astrid, your posts have come at a very opportune moment for us. We thought we had made a final decision on schooling for our older boys but are now having a rethink. Three of us loved Shaffhausen but my eldest was very concerned about how small his year group would be and the ratio of only 2 girls to 9 boys. Your eldest must be a similar age and I was wondering if she finds this a problem or does it have its advantages? I know the school is expanding so this could also mean an increase in year size.
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  #35  
Old 28.02.2012, 13:28
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Re: International Schools

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Hi Swiss Astrid, your posts have come at a very opportune moment for us. We thought we had made a final decision on schooling for our older boys but are now having a rethink. Three of us loved Shaffhausen but my eldest was very concerned about how small his year group would be and the ratio of only 2 girls to 9 boys. Your eldest must be a similar age and I was wondering if she finds this a problem or does it have its advantages? I know the school is expanding so this could also mean an increase in year size.
Well as a girl she doesn't mind having more boys around She has never mentioned it being a downside having not so many kids in MY and I think it is rather a good thing, low peer pressure, hardly any bullying. The school is expanding and although you have always people leave I think the MY will grow more. Next school year they will have their own building on the same grounds which will be even better.
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  #36  
Old 28.02.2012, 13:56
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Re: International Schools

Thank you for getting back to me Swiss Astrid.

He is currently in a super selective grammar school in the UK and I think peer pressure is a problem for him as he has mild dyslexia and he has also been bullied in the past. His is an all boys school plus only having brothers we were looking forward to him going to a mixed school and so was he, hence the disappointment with the lack of girls. However I am beginning to think a smaller school may suit him.
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  #37  
Old 29.02.2012, 17:28
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Re: International Schools

I was at the lakeside school (ZTZ) and still think it's the best decision my parents ever made. Have of a week is in german, the other half in English. There are swiss children/teachers and american/british ones. I absolutely loved it. After that I changed to a "gymnasium" (only german)
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  #38  
Old 02.03.2012, 09:50
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Re: International Schools

My kids are in ZIS and we've had a very good experience. My 5 year old got in very easily last year. Older one was on the wait list. Don't know much about the other ones, but I think it's one of the better IB schools around.
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