Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Family matters/health  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01.11.2011, 13:35
Karenin's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: England
Posts: 46
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 25 Times in 12 Posts
Karenin has earned some respectKarenin has earned some respect
Schools for 4 children

Hi,
I have read many of the threads in regards to the school situation but am still a little confused.

My eldest children are 14 and 13. The 14 year old is due to start GCSE courses next September. They are currently in a British Grammar school so would have been allocated a Gymnasium in the Swiss system.

My younger children are 6 and 8.

My husband has a job offer in Zurich.

Our plan was state school for the younger boys and International for the older with a preference for the English, GCSE option, as that is what I am familiar with and makes it perhaps easier to opt back into a British University education.

This means dealing with different school systems which people have advised against.
Would it be possible for the older two to move into a Gymnasium at their age.? They are both old in their year groups and the eldest is particularly mature for his age so I would be reluctant to move him back a year group.

We could afford fees for one and are hoping to negotiate a deal for help with the other.

In addition both the eldest and the 8 year old have some form of dyslexia. The eldest is currently allowed to use a laptop for some lessons because of this.

We are flexible on location as long as it is within an hours commute of Zurich so which areas might suit our needs best?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01.11.2011, 14:20
NotAllThere's Avatar
Modulo 2
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Baselland
Posts: 14,492
Groaned at 280 Times in 239 Posts
Thanked 21,733 Times in 8,816 Posts
NotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond reputeNotAllThere has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Schools for 4 children

In your situation, to me split schooling makes the most sense. If you put your older children into the Swiss system, they may do well, but unless they're already fluent German speakers, they'll be at an enormous disadvantage.
Reply With Quote
The following 5 users would like to thank NotAllThere for this useful post:
  #3  
Old 01.11.2011, 18:36
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Adliswil
Posts: 20
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 20 Times in 10 Posts
goodasgold has earned some respectgoodasgold has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

I'm not very expeienced in this, but I think IS do sound like a good idea for your eldest two.

Visit the schools and see which one would feel best for your children, and decide where to live based on that. The schools can have long waiting lists and at their age I don't think the student turnover is so high, so if you find a school that you like apply for places as soon as you can.

Best wishes.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank goodasgold for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 01.11.2011, 18:47
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Basel, Switzerland
Posts: 102
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 23 Times in 16 Posts
Lil'Angel has made some interesting contributions
Re: Schools for 4 children

Quote:
View Post
In your situation, to me split schooling makes the most sense. If you put your older children into the Swiss system, they may do well, but unless they're already fluent German speakers, they'll be at an enormous disadvantage.

After moving here from the UK in July our 9 year old daughter (at the time!) had no knowledge of the german language and so we looked at the International school to help make her transition far easier. We loved the school but decided that her integrating with the local community and picking up the language was more important to us and you wouldnt get that at an International school. We have sent her to a local swiss german school and she is in an integration programe which she is doing very well in and after only 10 weeks in school can now speak and write german well. She has made some great friends from all over the world and is loving it.. far far better schooling her than in the UK. I wish you all the very best for your decision on where to send your children - its not easy, we have had many sleepless nights trying to work out the best thing to do... think we got it right though! Good Luck to you all. Sarah
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Lil'Angel for this useful post:
  #5  
Old 01.11.2011, 19:45
miniMia's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: romandie
Posts: 9,975
Groaned at 101 Times in 92 Posts
Thanked 9,106 Times in 4,522 Posts
miniMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Schools for 4 children

I see no reason why you can't split them, with the 2 oldest in international school & the two youngest in local school. Why would anyone suggest you can't split them seems rather strange. What was the reasoning behind that?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank miniMia for this useful post:
  #6  
Old 01.11.2011, 19:51
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Adliswil
Posts: 20
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 20 Times in 10 Posts
goodasgold has earned some respectgoodasgold has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

I'm so glad that this is not my decision.

Sarah we have done the same with our 12 year old daughter, she has had almost six months of German lessons and is due to start local school this month, so I can't say whether her German will be good enough for her to keep up in classes and make friends yet. I'm not sure what age I would rather my child start doing exams than learning a new language. We are as sure as we can be that we will stay here until my eldest child has completed her secondary education.

Karenin, I was thinking about your preference for GCSEs and wondered why? A good IB, Swiss or US education is I think broader and more demanding. There could well be a lot of children with 10+ A* GCSEs in a couple of years. Good British universities will recognise international qualifications, and the grade requirements might be more lenient due to higher international fees?

Unless you think you will move back to the UK before your second child has completed his education I would avoid GCSEs. Also check the way that they are taught, in England the children are tested module by module, so even if the questions are as hard, they are diluted through being a series of small tests, rather than final style exams. If GCSEs are not tested like this here your children will be at a disadvantage to their English peers.

Also how important is it to you that they learn German? This will be much harder for them at an IS in Zurich. If they go to the one near me they are more likely to learn Californian!
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank goodasgold for this useful post:
  #7  
Old 01.11.2011, 20:49
swisspea's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: From one side of lake Zurich t
Posts: 6,354
Groaned at 42 Times in 31 Posts
Thanked 6,448 Times in 2,964 Posts
swisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Schools for 4 children

Our three children are all at bilingual Montessori school, but we will be choosing very different high school options for them.

The eldest has a very solid understanding of German after 3 years in the bilingual school, but has english language skills that are 'off the top of the scale' so feels very frustrated that she cannot do the same in German - although she loves French because the other kids are in the same situations as her so she has a chance to compete with them...

We are probably going to send her to an english speaking high school (boarding) next year.

The younger two are in a completely different boat. The middle one arrived at 8, and he's absolutely thrived with German and enjoys French, and he'll have had 4 years in Switzerland before he has to go to high school. He may well be able to meet the requirements for Gymnasium if he decides to put his mind to it (although he has a medical condition that might undermine his ability to do well in high-stress exam situations)...

The youngest arrived at 8 months. We hope to keep him in the Montessori system if possible, and at the moment he doesn't speak a lot of German, but we are tempted to transfer him to a monolingual school because his english is awesome (he's nearly 4 now)...and I think a year in a swiss school and he'll be speaking perfect swiss-German...

I'm on a well-worn path though - my brother, sister and I all went to different high schools for different reasons - my brother went to two of them - by his own choice...
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank swisspea for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 02.11.2011, 14:14
Karenin's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: England
Posts: 46
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 25 Times in 12 Posts
Karenin has earned some respectKarenin has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

Thank you for these responses.

It is good to hear that younger children have settled in well to the local schools as this would be the preferred route for our youngest the older of which would be 9 by the time the move happens.

Quote:
View Post
I see no reason why you can't split them, with the 2 oldest in international school & the two youngest in local school. Why would anyone suggest you can't split them seems rather strange. What was the reasoning behind that?
I can't remember where I read the piece of information in regards to this but I think it was to do with the logistics i.e holidays etc. That said even if we stay in England the younger two might not get into the same school as their older siblings so having them in different types of school has always been a possibility.

Re- the dyslexia, my eldest as I say uses a laptop and my 8 year old has extra support for reading. What sort of SEN support is available in Swiss schools?

My preference for GCSEs is purely personal based on having grown up with the system i.e I know which ones they need to be doing for certain universities and certain courses. My second son hopes to be a vet. If need be I would do some research on IB so that could be an option. In regards to German my eldest is currently learning it as one of his language options and although my husband doesn't need it for his job we would certainly want to learn it as a family.

Swisspea am interesting in knowing why you are choosing the boarding option. Would this be in Switzerland? This is one option for us, to leave the older two in England but both my husband and I are reluctant and we don't think the boys will want to do this either, although we will give them the choice.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02.11.2011, 14:31
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Zurich
Posts: 24
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 15 Times in 9 Posts
Mom in Zurich has earned some respectMom in Zurich has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

Hi there, I'm curious to learn more about what you have mentioned as "an integration programe". Our daughter is currently enrolled in a private bilingual school that is, obviously, quite expensive and we would like to explore moving her into a local school down the road but my understanding was that there wan not help to get kids up to speed on the language piece. Can you please guide me here.. thank you.

Quote:
View Post
After moving here from the UK in July our 9 year old daughter (at the time!) had no knowledge of the german language and so we looked at the International school to help make her transition far easier. We loved the school but decided that her integrating with the local community and picking up the language was more important to us and you wouldnt get that at an International school. We have sent her to a local swiss german school and she is in an integration programe which she is doing very well in and after only 10 weeks in school can now speak and write german well. She has made some great friends from all over the world and is loving it.. far far better schooling her than in the UK. I wish you all the very best for your decision on where to send your children - its not easy, we have had many sleepless nights trying to work out the best thing to do... think we got it right though! Good Luck to you all. Sarah
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02.11.2011, 15:09
Fair Maid of Kent's Avatar
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Zug
Posts: 3
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 15 Times in 4 Posts
Fair Maid of Kent has no particular reputation at present
Re: Schools for 4 children

Hi Karenin,
First, what ever the final educational destination of your children, I can promise you that they'll all get a much wider experience of life by coming here and will have far more independence than their friends back in the UK. There are lots of great activities here for active families - the contrast between our weekends now and the previous experience in SE London is immense!
When you consider location can I suggest you look at the Canton of Zug? What ever type of schooling you choose you will find a huge choice in Zug. And if you send any or all of the children to 'local' (Swiss) chools, you will find that there is a huge amount on offer to ease their transition and integration. I think this may be because this is a small canton, and also a wealthy one, so there is plently of money available to help foreign school pupils quickly get into the language and education system. Zug is about 25 mins on the train from Zurich and is a beautiful area and has lots of expat families. I find it suits me as its just the right size - has all the shops and services you need but not a busy and anonymous city like Zurich.
I'm a bit surprised though that you say the older children will qualify to enter the local gynasium, because they are currently in grammar schools. Have you been told this by a reliable source? It doesn't sound feasible to me - these gymnasium are very competitive and the academic pace is full on. I would check that out before going much further. But the 'secondary' schools are not second class. They provide a very good education which still allows Swiss children to go on to university.
Zug has 2 International Schools and one bilingual school. The bilingual school, Institute Montana, has an English speaking secondary school that heads towards the International Bacc. It also prepares pupils for GCSE's so you might find that attractive. It's not cheap however. But its in a super location!
That's enough information for now I'm sure. PM me if you need any more infor on Zug.
But in any event, the EF knows everything there is to know about living happily in Switzerland so keep your questions coming!
Good luck with the move
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Fair Maid of Kent for this useful post:
  #11  
Old 02.11.2011, 15:36
Karenin's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: England
Posts: 46
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 25 Times in 12 Posts
Karenin has earned some respectKarenin has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

Quote:
I'm a bit surprised though that you say the older children will qualify to enter the local gynasium, because they are currently in grammar schools. Have you been told this by a reliable source? It doesn't sound feasible to me - these gymnasium are very competitive and the academic pace is full on. I would check that out before going much further. But the 'secondary' schools are not second class. They provide a very good education which still allows Swiss children to go on to university.
Fair maid of Kent , sorry for any miss-understanding, I meant that had they been in the Swiss system from the beginning of their education then they would more than likely have been placed in a gymnasium as that is the Swiss equivalent to the highly selective school they are currently in. The language problem rules out that route for them now and is the reason we may have to opt out of the State system for those two in particular. I am hoping that with the other two they have the time to make up for the language disadvantage and will be able to remain in the state system.

My husband has mentioned Zug but am I right in thinking that property there is very expensive. I think we are going to struggle to find rental as we have a number of animals as well as 4 robust rather vocal boys. We are lucky that we currently live in a rural environment so the children do have a lot of freedom. That said the older boys have a lengthy travel to their school and hence their school friends, we would hope to avoid this if the move goes ahead.

Thank you for pointing out all these positives as it is what I need at the moment. The children haven't been told either and once we have confirmed then we are going to need as many positives as possible to sell the idea to them, especially the older boys.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02.11.2011, 15:56
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Zug
Posts: 141
Groaned at 2 Times in 1 Post
Thanked 60 Times in 41 Posts
clonskeagh has earned some respectclonskeagh has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

Just based on my own experience, it is very difficult to get into gymnasium in Zug and I believe Zurich is even harder. Basically a lot more Swiss parents want their children to attend than there are places available. If your older children are aiming for professional degree courses then I think it would be prudent to budget for international school or boardind school with a view to attending UK university.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank clonskeagh for this useful post:
  #13  
Old 02.11.2011, 16:30
miniMia's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: romandie
Posts: 9,975
Groaned at 101 Times in 92 Posts
Thanked 9,106 Times in 4,522 Posts
miniMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond reputeminiMia has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Schools for 4 children

Quote:
View Post


I can't remember where I read the piece of information in regards to this but I think it was to do with the logistics i.e holidays etc. That said even if we stay in England the younger two might not get into the same school as their older siblings so having them in different types of school has always been a possibility.
Ah, yes. It's quite possible they will have different vacation schedules.
But even then lower schools & higher schools sometimes have have different holiday schedules.

Well, good luck with your choice & your move!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank miniMia for this useful post:
  #14  
Old 02.11.2011, 16:56
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Basel, Switzerland
Posts: 102
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 23 Times in 16 Posts
Lil'Angel has made some interesting contributions
Re: Schools for 4 children

Quote:
View Post
Hi there, I'm curious to learn more about what you have mentioned as "an integration programe". Our daughter is currently enrolled in a private bilingual school that is, obviously, quite expensive and we would like to explore moving her into a local school down the road but my understanding was that there wan not help to get kids up to speed on the language piece. Can you please guide me here.. thank you.
Hi, Our daughter is in an 'Integration Programe' which is held at our local school in Reinach. Our daughter attends every day and speaks nothing but Swiss German. Her teacher does not speak english but her Teaching Assistant does so if our daughter gets a little confused she can ask for help. Lots of other children attend this programe and are from all different countires but want to learn the local language. A few speak English so our daughter has made quite a few friends - at the moment i believe its 15. They get to learn about swiss culture, money, shopping, travelling, environment, maths in fact everything to get to integrate into the community well. After a while (all depending on how well she picks up the language) she can go into a normal classroom situation and then carry on studying everything else.
If you get in touch with your local Gememide they will be able to help you get in contact with your local primary schools for further help. I believe that secondary schools are a little bit more limited in this but they still offer the programe. We felt this was far better than an IS for our daughter at the moment. Hope this helps. Good Luck. Sarah
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Lil'Angel for this useful post:
  #15  
Old 02.11.2011, 19:34
hayleyob's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Morges VD
Posts: 249
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 94 Times in 68 Posts
hayleyob has earned some respecthayleyob has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

Quote:
View Post
Hi there, I'm curious to learn more about what you have mentioned as "an integration programe". Our daughter is currently enrolled in a private bilingual school that is, obviously, quite expensive and we would like to explore moving her into a local school down the road but my understanding was that there wan not help to get kids up to speed on the language piece. Can you please guide me here.. thank you.
We live on the french side and my son is in 2ere enfantine. They have been good with his intergration, the teacher speaks to him in French and they have class time where he has to practise with all the children. She does have a limited vocab in english which is good to know. He has a classroom assistant who comes twice a week to have one on one time with him to expand his vocabulary. They also offered a study group in which me and him attend with other children learning french to learn games and techniques to do at home again to expand the french vocabulary. I found this a very useful activity and something Joe enjoyed too.

As he is in the local village school at least half the class live in our village which means he has made friends and intergrated with them. They all play together after school and in and out each others houses like little whirlwinds but it great as he is continuing to pick up the lingo.

The local school has so much to offer here, they go on regular outings recently the children went to watch a circus show and then a music show. They have trips planned to do ice skating in jan/feb time. They also take the kids camping up to grande rochelle for 2 nights in April. Plus lots of other activities which are combined with other village schools from local communes.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank hayleyob for this useful post:
  #16  
Old 02.11.2011, 22:16
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Aargau
Posts: 62
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 64 Times in 34 Posts
amch has no particular reputation at present
Re: Schools for 4 children

As far as I know, the only school in Zurich offering A levels and IGSCEs is Hulls. It is not the best international school around for sure, but you would get the continuity you seek if it is important to you. The problem with the IB or AP programs offered by the other international schools is the lack of recognition in Switzerland and many other European countries. It is enough to have 3 A levels, 1 AS and a few IGCSEs to enter a university in Switzerland. With an IB, you need a really high score to be accepted. For a child with a learning disability the British system is a lot more favorable than the Swiss Matura one, since he could choose the subjects within his areas of strength and avoid the ones where he is weak. The Swiss gymnasium is a more rounded education, and a learning disability is therefore more of a disadvantage.
For a 14 year old the transition into the Swiss system would be rather tough if you want to aim for a gymnasium entry, especially with dyslexia. You could always try to start an integration program and see how it goes. If an apprenticeship is an option for you, then even the older kids may do just fine if the integration program is good. Our son was in a mediocre one, but there are private alternatives or residential programs in Germany where 3 months would get you to a very decent level of German. So the 13 year old might well be able to transition to the Swiss gymi successfully if he is motivated enough.

For the neurotypical younger child local school should not be a problem. The one with dyslexia might do better without a language switch. You should consult with a specialist.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank amch for this useful post:
  #17  
Old 02.11.2011, 22:52
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Adliswil
Posts: 20
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 20 Times in 10 Posts
goodasgold has earned some respectgoodasgold has earned some respect
Re: Schools for 4 children

Quote:
View Post
Hi there, I'm curious to learn more about what you have mentioned as "an integration programe". Our daughter is currently enrolled in a private bilingual school that is, obviously, quite expensive and we would like to explore moving her into a local school down the road but my understanding was that there wan not help to get kids up to speed on the language piece. Can you please guide me here.. thank you.

My daughter (12) was offered six months of intensive German lessons at a private language school (Allegra) in Zurich. When this has finished she is expected to enter the local school system. So for the last five months she has not attended regular school, though they do teach terminology in other subjects it is not for extending her knowledge, just so that when she does maths or science she understands the vocabulary.

This tuition is free to us in Adliswil, and the travel costs are covered too.

I can't say how successful this will be for integrating her into the local school system, but I am delighted at how good at German she is now.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank goodasgold for this useful post:
  #18  
Old 03.11.2011, 12:01
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Schaffhausen
Posts: 81
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 26 Times in 16 Posts
Ethelreda has no particular reputation at present
Re: Schools for 4 children

IMHO I would put the 2 older ones in the international system - there is just too much to learn coping with a new country, a new language, a new schooling system, & new friends at that age. You may find that the international system will be rather more accomodating on the dyslexic front.

My eldest was 10 when we put her in the local school it takes about 2 years before they are fully fluent - each Cantons integration system is different as is each Cantons schooling system.

The 2 youngest I would put in the local system - they will have a ball - the first 6 months will be a bit tough as language IS a problem but after that ... there is simply no substitute for them having friends living in the community - my youngest comes home, does his homework then generally reappears around feeding time. In winter there is often a small riot going on in the basement.

Dyslexia - my eldest is dyslexic - despite telling school repeated she dyslexic (found it helps if you use the right word in german - Legasthenisch ) not a lot happened as she wasn't 'struggling' - I got her assessed in English in the UK then presented the report to school - only now has the ball started rolling. She gets 1 hour of support a week & is getting reassessed next week for more support. It has been a constant push push push with school but I have absolutely no regrets about putting my kids into the Swiss system. I will eat my hat if my daughter ends up at University but I know that within the Swiss system she will end up doing vocational training for a job. Sadly the same cannot be said of the British Education system where its University or bust.

Hope that helps - good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03.11.2011, 12:07
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Schaffhausen
Posts: 81
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 26 Times in 16 Posts
Ethelreda has no particular reputation at present
Re: Schools for 4 children

Sorry - forgot to add - as German is a phonetic language its not difficult for dyslexics to learn to speak or spell

Lets not discuss learning french .....
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03.11.2011, 12:29
Belgianmum's Avatar
Roastbeef & Yorkshire mod
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Neuchâtel
Posts: 13,459
Groaned at 250 Times in 211 Posts
Thanked 22,611 Times in 9,238 Posts
Belgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Schools for 4 children

Quote:
View Post

Karenin, I was thinking about your preference for GCSEs and wondered why? A good IB, Swiss or US education is I think broader and more demanding. There could well be a lot of children with 10+ A* GCSEs in a couple of years. Good British universities will recognise international qualifications, and the grade requirements might be more lenient due to higher international fees?

Unless you think you will move back to the UK before your second child has completed his education I would avoid GCSEs. Also check the way that they are taught, in England the children are tested module by module, so even if the questions are as hard, they are diluted through being a series of small tests, rather than final style exams. If GCSEs are not tested like this here your children will be at a disadvantage to their English peers.
you will need to think very carefully about whether your kids will want to go to university back in the UK.

Uk universities will accept iGCSE's and the IB but it can take a lot of hard work and effort to get a place based on other foreign qualifications. They just don't understand how the work and what their UK equivalent is and and so will very often not offer places to these kids or if the do the grade requirements are incredibly high. It's much tougher than with UK qualifications or an IB. I think an international school would be best for the older boys but the younger ones should do fine in the Swiss system.
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Foreign Children in Swiss Public Schools Judith Margaret Complaints corner 217 24.08.2021 10:22
English lessons for expat children attending state schools in Zurich Upthehatters2008 Education 14 23.01.2013 07:25
Sailing schools/courses for children on lake Constance meenakshi General off-topic 1 17.05.2011 12:46
International schools for young children in Uetliberg S.Saeed Family matters/health 3 12.05.2010 09:23
State schools and english only speaking children stevieb Family matters/health 5 05.03.2010 12:01


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:24.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0