Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Family matters/health  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 03.12.2011, 08:46
swisspea's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: From one side of lake Zurich t
Posts: 6,353
Groaned at 42 Times in 31 Posts
Thanked 6,448 Times in 2,964 Posts
swisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

It sounds like you are really on the right track to me!

I can recommend the 'psycomotorik' therapy. It can't do any harm, and there are some good things that can happen with the fine-motor and hand-eye coordination which will help him in a lot of areas (these are important foundations for writing and reading too!)...

As for cutting out the TV...there are heaps of websites around about living TV-free. We did it for the first 5 years of our first two children's lives. And that meant zero screen time at home, and they only watched carefully selected DVD's at Grandma's house once a week...

It does mean a change of lifestyle, and at first the kids won't know what to do instead, but it's far easier to have zero than to have to continuously negotiate how much they are allowed (and all that whingeing)...
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank swisspea for this useful post:
  #62  
Old 03.12.2011, 08:58
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

To cut down on telly we started letting my son listen to children's radio. He has it on in his room and it seems, if anything, to keep him focussed on tasks for longer. He listens to the stories and songs and it's a bit of background noise while he's doing his jigsaw or staging his famous Lego productions...

We noticed when he's watching telly, he's just goggling at the screen and not doing anything else.

We listen to Cbeebies radio.

Back to your meeting with the teachers; it sounds like you made some good progress and taking your friend along was a stroke of genius - especially given his background.

Last edited by Sandgrounder; 03.12.2011 at 09:24.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #63  
Old 03.12.2011, 10:31
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Near Geneva
Posts: 3,216
Groaned at 35 Times in 29 Posts
Thanked 4,162 Times in 1,847 Posts
Anjela has a reputation beyond reputeAnjela has a reputation beyond reputeAnjela has a reputation beyond reputeAnjela has a reputation beyond reputeAnjela has a reputation beyond reputeAnjela has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

A friend has a son with a fine motor skills problem, DCD or Dyspraxia.
In his case he's very good at things like computer games, but rubbish at handling cutlery properly and his handwriting is so appalling he's allowed to use a laptop in class to type his work.

I know that at five your son's not going to be writing essays all the time, but it might be worth watching him draw to see how he handles pencils; they're trickier than you'd think! Also see how he is at balls games, catching, throwing.

If he's not showing any problems there then he's almost certainly fine, but cutting down on the TV and doing physical activities instead won't be a bad thing. Although it's not going to be easy with a new little one in the house.

Congratulations by the way, hope you're all doing well!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Anjela for this useful post:
  #64  
Old 03.12.2011, 10:49
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Zurich
Posts: 16
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
mkovi has no particular reputation at present
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

So sorry to hear all this...you have received some great feedback here. As parents we often struggle to get people to see our children for who they are. I wish you great luck in finding a solution that allows your son to be at ease and express himself. We had a problem with the first school we put our daughter. We moved her and it was the best thing we ever did. She is very happy and normal despite the first school's issues and that is what they were issue's within the school and how they handle the children. Best of luck!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank mkovi for this useful post:
  #65  
Old 03.12.2011, 11:32
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: basel
Posts: 2,358
Groaned at 24 Times in 16 Posts
Thanked 2,426 Times in 1,164 Posts
biff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post
Hi guys,

1. .... I think I got carried away with my fears about this teacher because while she came across as still a bit old school and not the most smiley 1ady, she is also very passionate about her work and committed to the welfare and progress of the children in her care.....

Bringing this particular friend of mine was sort of a trump card for me. So as soon as the teacher brought up the issue of autism he spoke about his //work experience and spoke almost as a referee for my son who he has known for the past 9 months or so. That seemed to work quite positively for us because autism wasn't referenced again in the meeting.

So she raised with us a number of observations she had made about my son over the past 5 months and they boiled down to the following two:
He is a loner, who prefers to play by himself instead of interacting with other children......

2) She thinks that his fine motor-skills are not as developed as they should be.....
I could argue that my observations are the opposite: every time I've seen him go into his class he is always the first to strike up conversations with other kids, recently I told him off for pulling down the pants on one kid, and then running off with another's hat: in other words hardly the shy guy she sees!........

Over the course of the meeting she made a number of recommendations most of which address her second concern and these are:

1) That my son should enroll for a psychomotility assessment. These guys will check his fine-motor skills and if they feel some therapy is required, they would provide it once a week for an hour.

2) She gave us two classroom games which are designed to help develop fine motor skills in children and asked us to play these with my son twice a day.

3) She believes that the poor fine-motor skills are down to excessive time spent in passive activities, namely too much TV and too much computer. She has a point because my son probably does watch too much TV, and his home-learning is supplemented by computer programs (point and click stuff). So she asked us to completely cut out his TV for the next 2-3 months and restrict computer games time to once a week!!

I have no idea how he/we will survive without TV for 2-3 months!!

4) She asked us to contact a child therapist to get a more comprehensive assessment performed of my son's sensory development. Completely unnecessary I think but if getting an expert's opinion will make her happy and bring an end to this saga, that works for us.suffer that same problem. A copy of the report from the assessment would be sent to her so that if areas of underdevelopment are identified she knows to focus her work in those areas with my son.

5. Reading back over this plan does make it sound like a bit of a capitulation on our part (especially the TV bit!), but in the context of things, I think it's a good plan. She came across as sincere, she made some nice gestures, as with giving us the games to take home, and also said she wants to help however she can to get my son ready for the next school.

And it's weird hearing all this stuff about my son's fine-motor skills when I see him playing with his Lego, Meccano and building blocks throughout the week and see him handling scissors correctly when he is doing arts and crafts stuff at home. But having said that I did notice this evening when I asked him to stroke the head of our baby that his hand seemed a bit unsteady and his fingers didn't naturally bend to the shape of the baby's head.....
Apologies for the partial quotes above - I don't know how to do "multiple quotes."

1. I am starting to think I must be the teacher!! Please, parents ( all parents) don't let your generational bias get in the way of having an objective relationship with your child's teacher. From experience ( and one that I quote to any new yeacher) generally it seems that parents will dismiss any teacher under 30 ( too young, too inexperienced, doesn't dress well) and over 40 (too old, over the hill, old fashioned, dresses funny.....)

2. Presuming that a teacher does not actually have extra training/interest in finemotor control issues, s/he will still be making this observation based on what the norm is within the classroom. ie: from observation of many children ( over many years.) As parents. we tend to have only a few contacts to be contrasting our child with, to precive what is usual development. Also, as a parent, I would want to follow up any "something doesn't seem right" that a teacher has mentioned, if only for reassurance that things are perfectly normal.

3. How much TV is too much? How many hours a day should children be engaged in passive activity, versus active ones? Well, it's over 20 years since I first went to seminars on this subject and it seems the jury is still out ( fighting) with less and less adults being able to actually remember life without the box in the corner ( now also in the kitchen, the bedroom, the car...) I would perfer to walk into a house and find childrens books, board games, packs of cards, art resources and a pile of well-used outdoor playclothes.

4. Getting that extra opinion will not do any harm and will not traumatise your child. If there is something that needs help, the sooner you know the better. If there is nothing wrong, great - and be glad that your child has a teacher who shows concern.

5. Don't think of it as giving in or winners/losers. You and the teacher are actually both on the same team - all wanting what is best for your child.

Finally, "He is a loner." That comment, I don't like! It is not an objective one and is one that I would ask to have explained. Observation method? Timesampling? running records? etc. Spending a lot of time alone can be for many totally unrelated reasons ( shy, can't share, bored,is able to make activity choices independent of peers, has other interests etc etc) Obviously, if your child is pulling down pants of others and grabbing their hats, he is making social connections ( of some sort....the appropriateness of which depends on the situation)

You are obviously a concerned, involved parent. Keep up the good involvement. :-)
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank biff for this useful post:
  #66  
Old 03.12.2011, 11:52
wattsli1's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Basel Land
Posts: 730
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 943 Times in 338 Posts
wattsli1 has a reputation beyond reputewattsli1 has a reputation beyond reputewattsli1 has a reputation beyond reputewattsli1 has a reputation beyond reputewattsli1 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Just wanted to say congratulations on the new arrival and glad to hear of the positive outcome.

We're kind of in the same boat too - and my son is going to start the third round of ergotherapy for fine motor skills too. I am still not convinced of his "problems" either - just like you said - he has no problem handling tiny bits of lego, and whilst his writing is not perfect it's not THAT bad. He's improved a lot anyway - I can't put it down exclusively to the previous ergotherapy, but it can't have hurt. And more to the point he got an hour of one to one attention with a really good teacher who was absolutely dedicated to helping him and listening to him - and that on it's own was a really good thing for him. I think it also helped his confidence with Swiss German enormously.

The only problem for us was really the ferrying around - we had to take him to the appointments and back to kindergarten and it was hard to get a slot with the therapist (we're both working parents).

Anyway, enjoy Christmas with your new expanded family and hope things work out with your son.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank wattsli1 for this useful post:
  #67  
Old 03.12.2011, 14:57
Jim2007's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Kt. Bern
Posts: 4,755
Groaned at 241 Times in 190 Posts
Thanked 7,833 Times in 3,452 Posts
Jim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post
I have no idea how he/we will survive without TV for 2-3 months!!
Get a beginner box of Stokys, it is far better than Lego for developing "nimble fingers" as it requires a broader rang of skills. But be prepared to get involved as it does require more adult involvement than a box of Lego...

My son has Asperger Syndrome and although he spent several hours a day building with Lego, it really did not help... a box of Stokys made a great improvement as he was very motivated to build the models and would spend hours trying to hold 3 or 4 pieces in line so that he could put a bolt through the holes and thread a nut on to it at the same time. After about 12 months he did show a very marked improvement.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Jim2007 for this useful post:
  #68  
Old 03.12.2011, 15:16
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: basel
Posts: 2,358
Groaned at 24 Times in 16 Posts
Thanked 2,426 Times in 1,164 Posts
biff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond reputebiff has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post
Get a beginner box of Stokys, it is far better than Lego for developing "nimble fingers" as.
New name for Meccano?
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 04.12.2011, 00:12
Jim2007's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Kt. Bern
Posts: 4,755
Groaned at 241 Times in 190 Posts
Thanked 7,833 Times in 3,452 Posts
Jim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post
New name for Meccano?
No a competitor, it's been around for well over 50 years, but has only recently been restarted, by some retired modelers. It now offers apprenticeships to kids that might not otherwise get them - usually foreign kids born here. Here is a clip from SwissInfo on it.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 09.12.2011, 02:04
PaperMoon2's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 499
Groaned at 24 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 100 Times in 74 Posts
PaperMoon2 has earned the respect of manyPaperMoon2 has earned the respect of manyPaperMoon2 has earned the respect of many
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post
Just to update you guys, the teacher cancelled the last meeting and rescheduled for tomorrow. I picked up my son today and I asked in passing, is he doing ok? And she said "he is doing ok but there are lots of problems we need to discuss, and we have to plan for his career."

I thought "you what?" If there were "lots of problems", as his parent I am sure I would have picked up some signals myself that not all was right; but my son exhibits all the behaviour of other children his age.

And as for planning for his career? He's only 5 yrs old!

This has really got me down, and I'm quite worried about what she will bring up tomorrow. Anyway, I've arranged for a friend to come to the meeting with me to help with any translating if required as I'm still learning the language myself.

Will just have to see what happens...
His career? At 5 yrs old?

Quote:
My (also 5 year-old) son wants to paint police cars or feed elephants for a career - should I be worried?
LOL!! Yeah at 5yrs old most want careers like becoming the ones who paint the big yellow lines in the street or being an amusement park worker or cotton candy maker or things like that. Hahaha

Quote:
View Post
It sounds like you are really on the right track to me!

I can recommend the 'psycomotorik' therapy. It can't do any harm, and there are some good things that can happen with the fine-motor and hand-eye coordination which will help him in a lot of areas (these are important foundations for writing and reading too!)...

As for cutting out the TV...there are heaps of websites around about living TV-free. We did it for the first 5 years of our first two children's lives. And that meant zero screen time at home, and they only watched carefully selected DVD's at Grandma's house once a week...

It does mean a change of lifestyle, and at first the kids won't know what to do instead, but it's far easier to have zero than to have to continuously negotiate how much they are allowed (and all that whingeing)...
Yeah it shouldn't be too hard, you just have to buy more things to entertain him like crafts, coloring books, reading books for his age, claydough, legos, Lincoln logs (I used to love Lincoln logs as a kid!), plus games that are not electronic. Things to make him use his imagination and his fingers. Plus let him get lots of outdoor activity too like playing the park, riding a bike etc. The thing with TV is it keeps kids from using their imagination and keeps them from using their hands or moving around.

Quote:
To cut down on telly we started letting my son listen to children's radio. He has it on in his room and it seems, if anything, to keep him focussed on tasks for longer. He listens to the stories and songs and it's a bit of background noise while he's doing his jigsaw or staging his famous Lego productions...

We noticed when he's watching telly, he's just goggling at the screen and not doing anything else.

We listen to Cbeebies radio.

Back to your meeting with the teachers; it sounds like you made some good progress and taking your friend along was a stroke of genius - especially given his background.
Yeah listening to stories is really good to have in the background.

Quote:
View Post
Get a beginner box of Stokys, it is far better than Lego for developing "nimble fingers" as it requires a broader rang of skills. But be prepared to get involved as it does require more adult involvement than a box of Lego...

My son has Asperger Syndrome and although he spent several hours a day building with Lego, it really did not help... a box of Stokys made a great improvement as he was very motivated to build the models and would spend hours trying to hold 3 or 4 pieces in line so that he could put a bolt through the holes and thread a nut on to it at the same time. After about 12 months he did show a very marked improvement.
Oh those Stokys look nice I bet all boys would love those! They are more complicated than legos and requires more coordination and imagination.
__________________
~Life is a long discovery isn't it? You only get your wisdom bit by bit. ~
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 09.12.2011, 08:50
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Walchwil
Posts: 2
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
amanphil has no particular reputation at present
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Hi, well here goes! I am a Kindergarten teacher here and I need to stress that it's not all about numbers, reading etc. kindergarten is about learning to share, socialize and verbalise needs without parents intervention. Your son may be advanced in some areas but they are not the important areas for kindergarten. It's alarming how many kindergarten parents dismiss the important stuff and focus on reading and writing. The teacher is putting your son in the difficult situation so that he can learn to deal with this problem without parental involvement. The party sounds like a great idea, do not get a clown! So many kindergarten are terrified of clowns but can't say anything because everyone else seems to be enjoying it. I have seen many parties break up early because of the clown.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 07.03.2012, 23:22
Kash_Z's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 455
Groaned at 3 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 594 Times in 195 Posts
Kash_Z has a reputation beyond reputeKash_Z has a reputation beyond reputeKash_Z has a reputation beyond reputeKash_Z has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Hi all,

I wanted to bring you guys up to date because today was the day of my son's assessment at the Kinderspital.

Since my last post in this thread we've ramped up the amount of time he spends in creative activities and cut down how long he spends in front of the TV. He is also playing outside with the local kids more than he used to. His teacher says that she is seeing improvements but everything "is still not 100% perfect."

In a nutshell the day at the hospital went great. The Doctor was really helpful, and after some initial shyness my son opened up and interacted with him quite confidently.

I opened up by explaining to the Doctor that I was really only there because of the fuss that the teacher was creating, so he reviewed the document of her classroom observations and then had an informal "chat" with my son. After some more information given about our home environment and the activities that my son is involved in on a week-to-week basis he said that we can rule out autism straightaway (woo-hoo!). And then to my surprise he said that he was wondering if there was even any point to doing the assessment because there was no outward manifestation of a problem and he didn't see why we should assess him if we weren't checking for something specific.

I explained that the teacher is expecting a report so if we don't do the tests we could just be kicking the can down the road only for her to create a fuss later. So after a word with his superior he decided to go ahead with the assessment.

Then for the next - almost - three hours he assessed my son's cognitive abilities and memory skills using a number of games and puzzles designed by child therapists in the 70s in the US. This was stuff like recognising patterns, correctly identifying logical sequences, filling in blanks, etc. And then there was an assessment of my son's physical abilities like hopping on one leg, climbing stairs, jumping, catching and kicking a ball, walking a balancing beam, etc. and it ended with a physical assessment on a hospital bed.

When he produced the report, it showed that my son was slightly above average in all of the areas being tested.

But there was one actionable item that came out of the report. The one test that my son scored low in was the first one: the one that was conducted in German. All the others were done in English. So his conclusion was that my son's grasp of Deutsch was not as good as the teacher and we imagined it was. He said this might also explain why my son avoids making eye contact with the teacher, because making eye contact necessitates making conversation, and because of his lack of confidence in speaking he avoids making the eye contact in the first place. So now I'm going to search for a local sports verein for kids so that he is given extra exposure to a German environment with children. We'll also get him watching the kids programs on German channels from now on instead of on the BBC.

I also told the Doctor that my son has already started to read and write, and can also do basic maths. After testing my son on these things he speculated that the complaint that he can be disruptive in class could be because he is bored, and that bored children tend to behave in ways that are not usual for them. So all in all it would be counter-productive to hold him back a year as the teacher had threatened.

He is going to follow up this assessment by giving her a call to try and work out what she is seeing that his assessments have failed to show. I said to him, "don't take this the wrong way, she is a nice lady but she has a ... strong personality," to which he replied, "don't worry, so do I."

Reply With Quote
The following 13 users would like to thank Kash_Z for this useful post:
  #73  
Old 07.03.2012, 23:43
venice's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: zurich
Posts: 704
Groaned at 11 Times in 5 Posts
Thanked 688 Times in 353 Posts
venice has a reputation beyond reputevenice has a reputation beyond reputevenice has a reputation beyond reputevenice has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

thanks for coming back to share, well done! you're a great dad and you have really helped your son with your positive but critical attitude.
your experience shows just how worthwhile it can be to "fight" in the interest of your child.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank venice for this useful post:
  #74  
Old 07.03.2012, 23:44
MacGregor's Daughter's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Zug
Posts: 3,169
Groaned at 31 Times in 23 Posts
Thanked 3,563 Times in 1,463 Posts
MacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

That's good news!
Let me tell something about Swiss teachers and their evaluation of kids: friends of mine have a son who started school and during math lessons he played with the bricks they had for the kids to learn counting. The point was that he had solved every exercise on his paper without the bricks and had nothing else to do while the others were still counting. The teacher said he should go to a special needs school, because he would only play with these bricks and he was way behind, also he didn't interact with other children. The parents sent him to a boarding school. Turned out this boy was mentally gifted and he passed his matura with an average grade of..6!
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank MacGregor's Daughter for this useful post:
  #75  
Old 07.03.2012, 23:44
ecb's Avatar
ecb ecb is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: out n about - it's summer!
Posts: 2,198
Groaned at 8 Times in 8 Posts
Thanked 3,566 Times in 1,322 Posts
ecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Thank you for the update. Lovely to hear the good news.

Hope all the children (in particular the little one) are thriving and that your son is enjoying being Big Brother.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank ecb for this useful post:
  #76  
Old 07.03.2012, 23:53
Carlos R's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Roundn'about Basel
Posts: 7,232
Groaned at 105 Times in 95 Posts
Thanked 9,934 Times in 4,178 Posts
Carlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond reputeCarlos R has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post
But there was one actionable item that came out of the report. The one test that my son scored low in was the first one: the one that was conducted in German. All the others were done in English. So his conclusion was that my son's grasp of Deutsch was not as good as the teacher and we imagined it was. He said this might also explain why my son avoids making eye contact with the teacher, because making eye contact necessitates making conversation, and because of his lack of confidence in speaking he avoids making the eye contact in the first place. So now I'm going to search for a local sports verein for kids so that he is given extra exposure to a German environment with children. We'll also get him watching the kids programs on German channels from now on instead of on the BBC.
It is amazing what difference the teacher makes.

Our son, now in 1st year primary after 3 years in the CH system is doing very well in maths (his teacher's comment not ours) and most school activities, and by all accounts, the teacher (quite old) loves him.

This half-term he came back from skiing. I expected him to tell his friends and I asked him about this in the evening after his first day back.

His reply: "I didn't because my German isn't good enough".

This really surprised us, as his German is quite good - much better than mine - even if his vocab isn't quite as varied as ours, he still has a better grasp of verbs etc.

We took it up with the teacher who said that they had had a circle time when all children had said what they'd done, and yes, he'd hardly said anything - which had surprised her at the time.

Over the phone we've put a plan together whereby she's going to encourage him to tell her when he's not understood something and she's giving us some books to read to him to broaden his vocab. All this week...

What a difference a constructive teacher makes vs. destructive.

Good luck Kash. Hope the Dr delivers.
__________________
Never let right or wrong get in the way of a good opinion
Reply With Quote
The following 5 users would like to thank Carlos R for this useful post:
  #77  
Old 08.03.2012, 00:13
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,471
Groaned at 17 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 1,996 Times in 1,189 Posts
CH_Me has a reputation beyond reputeCH_Me has a reputation beyond reputeCH_Me has a reputation beyond reputeCH_Me has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post
I explained that the teacher is expecting a report so if we don't do the tests we could just be kicking the can down the road only for her to create a fuss later. So after a word with his superior he decided to go ahead with the assessment.

Then for the next - almost - three hours he assessed my son's cognitive abilities and memory skills using a number of games and puzzles designed by child therapists in the 70s in the US. This was stuff like recognising patterns, correctly identifying logical sequences, filling in blanks, etc. And then there was an assessment of my son's physical abilities like hopping on one leg, climbing stairs, jumping, catching and kicking a ball, walking a balancing beam, etc. and it ended with a physical assessment on a hospital bed.

When he produced the report, it showed that my son was slightly above average in all of the areas being tested.

But there was one actionable item that came out of the report. The one test that my son scored low in was the first one: the one that was conducted in German. All the others were done in English. So his conclusion was that my son's grasp of Deutsch was not as good as the teacher and we imagined it was. He said this might also explain why my son avoids making eye contact with the teacher, because making eye contact necessitates making conversation, and because of his lack of confidence in speaking he avoids making the eye contact in the first place. So now I'm going to search for a local sports verein for kids so that he is given extra exposure to a German environment with children. We'll also get him watching the kids programs on German channels from now on instead of on the BBC.

I also told the Doctor that my son has already started to read and write, and can also do basic maths. After testing my son on these things he speculated that the complaint that he can be disruptive in class could be because he is bored, and that bored children tend to behave in ways that are not usual for them. So all in all it would be counter-productive to hold him back a year as the teacher had threatened.

He is going to follow up this assessment by giving her a call to try and work out what she is seeing that his assessments have failed to show. I said to him, "don't take this the wrong way, she is a nice lady but she has a ... strong personality," to which he replied, "don't worry, so do I."

I understand how hard it can be when there is just one teacher who decides your child's fate. Our son will be 6 a few months too late for the cut off to start Grade 1 later this year. He loves learning, asks so many questions and wants to know how everything works. His Kindergarten teacher (a private KG) said that he was not ready for Grade 1 yet another school, a private fee paying one, has said that he is ready to start Grade 1. They did a physiologist's assessment that sounds very much like the one your son did. My son came out with good English and German language results and did very well in math for his age. His current Kindergarten teacher didn't even recognise that he is good at math when I asked.

After a phone call the local school psychologist called me up and offered to test him to see if he is ready for local primary school. Fingers crossed on the results.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank CH_Me for this useful post:
  #78  
Old 09.03.2012, 10:26
Jack of all trades.'s Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 813
Groaned at 22 Times in 15 Posts
Thanked 667 Times in 325 Posts
Jack of all trades. has a reputation beyond reputeJack of all trades. has a reputation beyond reputeJack of all trades. has a reputation beyond reputeJack of all trades. has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

It looks to me as though the teacher is wrong to say that the child may be autistic. That is the area of a professional trained to identify such issues.

Also be very mindfull that teachers tend to aggressively back each other up. So if you have the chance to chat with the Principal or realy any other person connected with this then be very respectfull of all teaching staff when making comments.

Even though it is good for a child to get along with other children who are not liked there should be a limit to how far this should be taken. I.e. the teacher should not pair up your child with their enemies all the time. Rather there should be equality with pairing up. After all the kids do need to learn to deal with all types.

Lastly, gifted children tend to be treated poorly if not identified to be gifted. Being bored may be the result of the child being ahead of the class. A male child in my childs class is extreemely bored and very gifted. He wrote his first book at the age of 5. Pretty good for a Swiss child.

Hope this helped.

Regards.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Jack of all trades. for this useful post:
  #79  
Old 12.03.2012, 15:08
Kash_Z's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Zurich
Posts: 455
Groaned at 3 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 594 Times in 195 Posts
Kash_Z has a reputation beyond reputeKash_Z has a reputation beyond reputeKash_Z has a reputation beyond reputeKash_Z has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Thanks for your feedback and support guys, I really appreciate it.

Marie your comment reminded me of another part of my discussion with the Doctor at the Kinderspital. He asked whether I had considered sending my son to a private school, because in his words "if one route is blocked, you should try another."

At one level I think this is so wrong: how can a child be OK for entry to a fee-paying school but not a public school? I told him that while I'm not opposed to sending him to a private school later in life the idea of paying 20k-30k CHF/year for him to be painting, playing and other stuff that 6/7 yr olds do here doesn't sit well with me.

Then strangely he asked whether I'd consider moving back to the UK if my son would be placed in the appropriate class? I told him that that would be a last resort.

He was interested in the age of the teacher and seemed to agree that there are still many "old school" type teachers here. He also volunteered that in his opinion Switzerland isn't as open to differences and variety in the way that London is.

Despite the fact that my son has done well in his assessment it's still a nerve-wracking time. Apparently he came home today saying that his teacher wasn't happy with him. I am waiting for the Doctor to post us the official report and then I'll take it up with the teacher and the school doctor (who visits the class next week).

Marie, I hope everything goes well with your son's assessment. Let us know how it goes.

PS. Switzerland is desensitising me to the fact that a 6 yr old could be put through physiological and psychological assessments!!!!

PPS. Does anyone know at which time of the year the teacher makes their decision as to whether they will put the child through to the next school?

Quote:
View Post
I understand how hard it can be when there is just one teacher who decides your child's fate. Our son will be 6 a few months too late for the cut off to start Grade 1 later this year. He loves learning, asks so many questions and wants to know how everything works. His Kindergarten teacher (a private KG) said that he was not ready for Grade 1 yet another school, a private fee paying one, has said that he is ready to start Grade 1. They did a physiologist's assessment that sounds very much like the one your son did. My son came out with good English and German language results and did very well in math for his age. His current Kindergarten teacher didn't even recognise that he is good at math when I asked.

After a phone call the local school psychologist called me up and offered to test him to see if he is ready for local primary school. Fingers crossed on the results.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 12.03.2012, 16:04
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Solothurn
Posts: 725
Groaned at 88 Times in 55 Posts
Thanked 645 Times in 325 Posts
Enaj has a reputation beyond reputeEnaj has a reputation beyond reputeEnaj has a reputation beyond reputeEnaj has a reputation beyond reputeEnaj has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Problem at my son's school - advice needed

Quote:
View Post

He was interested in the age of the teacher and seemed to agree that there are still many "old school" type teachers here. He also volunteered that in his opinion Switzerland isn't as open to differences and variety in the way that London is.
Very true. I once was amazed when a third class teacher told me my sons reading was not up to scratch and I should practise more with him. I told her that I had been practising with him since he was about 3 years old but that he had absolutely NO interest in reading whatsoever and his usual reaction was to disappear when I got a book out. We were in total disagreement because she was convinced that if I read half hour with him every day he would improve and start to LOVE reading. I said no I dont agree because it "just isnt in him" to be an avid reader and I am of the opinion that it is the duty of the teacher to draw out that which is in the child to begin with.

Well, 16 years later I still dont think he has ever read a book but he has wonderful skills as a handyman and am convinced he has amazing survival skills and would have been ideal in a third world country living on the streets.

Pity his time at school was so stressful because certain teachers could only see that he was not so good at reading and German grammar but ignored all his other positive traits.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
autism, school




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My son is getting bullied at school, need some advise how to handle it, pls??? MARIPOSA Daily life 93 15.12.2011 11:03
Taking my son out of school for vacation heatherdodd84 Family matters/health 40 08.08.2011 18:04
I need my son to start school in Lugano. Anybody knows about EU15? Daniela66 Introductions 12 17.07.2011 14:23
Local school for my 12 year old son bkalesan Family matters/health 8 10.06.2010 11:19
Private English tutor needed for my son Swiss missus Family matters/health 10 27.01.2010 17:48


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:50.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0