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  #21  
Old 26.11.2011, 09:49
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Re: How to deal with eating disorders of teenagers?

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Its for a girl now.... Am I wrong to blame this to the high importance teens place on appereance and looks?
No, you are not wrong to blame it on this, at least partly. However, there can be other issues that need to be worked through as well. I am wondering - on another post, I think you mentioned a second child (son)who seems to have problem with overeating. Is/has food been used as a reward or other emotional tool, within the family? Are the children using food (control, or lack of) as copesation for something else?......... Or...... there culd be many reasons for the proble. Are there any apparent emotional issues/ family upsets/ school issues/ peer problems that could be affecting mebers of your family? Best wishes with getting everything back to "normal."
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  #22  
Old 26.11.2011, 10:17
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Re: How to deal with eating disorders of teenagers?

Hi
the CHUV have a special dept:
Service de Psychiatrie de Liaison (PLI)
abC - Centre vaudois anorexie boulimie


Consultation ambulatoire
espace CHUV
Psychiatrie de Liaison
Rue du Bugnon 44
1011 Lausanne (
plan de situation)
Tél. : ++41 (0)21 314 10 83
Fax : ++41 (0)21 314 10 88
E-mail :
Nicole.Bissat@chuv.ch
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  #23  
Old 26.11.2011, 10:52
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Re: How to deal with eating disorders of teenagers?

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No, you are not wrong to blame it on this, at least partly. However, there can be other issues that need to be worked through as well. I am wondering - on another post, I think you mentioned a second child (son)who seems to have problem with overeating. Is/has food been used as a reward or other emotional tool, within the family? Are the children using food (control, or lack of) as copesation for something else?......... Or...... there culd be many reasons for the proble. Are there any apparent emotional issues/ family upsets/ school issues/ peer problems that could be affecting mebers of your family? Best wishes with getting everything back to "normal."
Next to therapy for your daughther, maybe you should consider a family therapy? In the end, you are all in it together...
Best of luck!
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Old 26.11.2011, 10:53
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Re: How to deal with eating disorders of teenagers?

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Its for a girl now.... Am I wrong to blame this to the high importance teens place on appereance and looks?
Not entirely. But in my experience, there's usually some additional underlying issues. Not always though. Sometimes it's just the (bad) luck of the draw.

In my kids' classes, I don't know of any eating disorders, but there's always a few self-harmers.
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Old 26.11.2011, 10:53
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Re: How to deal with eating disorders of teenagers?

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Its for a girl now.... Am I wrong to blame this to the high importance teens place on appereance and looks?
You'll never know this until she is properly assessed. I wouldn't start looking for reasons to hang it on right now in case you are barking up the wrong tree.

Concentrate on getting her some professional help then you can feel that you are making positive steps in the right direction instead of casting around at things that "might be".
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  #26  
Old 26.11.2011, 14:30
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Re: eating disorder help in switzerland

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What is anorexia, what is bullimia, what if a person has both???
Well there are clinical definitions for both, although so many women have fallen into some sort of middle ground, that there is now "EDNOS" (i.e. eating disorder not otherwise specified).

Anorexia nervosa has criteria such as mental health attributes, where a person has obsessive behaviors around food and an unnatural obsession with being thin. There are also physical manifestations/signs that are quantified around a lower weight percentage than is normal for that person and the absence of menstrual periods for a specified amount of time.

I find that most people think of bulimia as throwing up. But it covers more than that. I became bulimic after developing anorexia and never threw up. I did, however, exercise compulsively and used laxatives. Bulimia is about trying to purge the body of calories/fat.

Anorexia and bulimia can go hand-in-hand for many reasons. When you starve yourself, you can get a rebound effect of binging, which is then followed by desperate attempts to purge yourself of the calories.

My next words aren't scientific but they're mine from experience. One of the reasons I think eating disorders are so tough to kick is because they aren't just mental health disorders. They can start out that way (and some studies do suggest a genetic predisposition too). But try for a minute to think about eating in really simple, natural terms.

You feel hungry. You eat. You feel full, you stop. Our bodies are designed to signal hunger and fullness to us via various chemicals and pathways. Although it can be normal to overeat sometimes, binging goes far beyond overeating. When your mind dominates your body and forces your body into a very unnatural state, what once may have worked to signal hunger and fullness quite fine no longer works.

Now fast forward to treatment. In a best case scenario, let's say you've worked through the mental health stuff. You feel determined and ready to really eat in a natural way. You are becoming more accepting and realistic about a normal body size for yourself. But remember, eating isn't just about you craving a specific food or randomly deciding to eat. You're hungry. But for someone who suffers from an eating disorder, your body isn't what it used to be. You don't feel normal hunger signals and normal fullness/satiety. You're battling against a body that works against you - not with you.

Not only that, but with an eating disorder, you can't abstain from food as an alcoholic or drug addict can abstain from drugs. You have to eat to survive. And the longer you continue to suffer from an eating disorder, the more you damage your body and risk dying.

For me, these thoughts I have on eating disorders are why I think early intervention is so important. Some damage is reversible - I've been lucky enough to get pregnant twice on the first try for each time, despite being told I'd never be able to have kids. Yet I have osteopenia (low bone density) and many problems with my circulation (Raynaud's disease).

For a parent, learning about eating disorders can seem overwhelming. It's definitely good to do some reading. But love and support are the most important things, especially in a world where there is still so much medical ignorance (I won't even get started on jokes doctors have made about/to me and others I've met).

Most people who suffer from an eating disorder would be appalled to see anyone they love treat their body the same way. That should say something to you about its roots.
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  #27  
Old 26.11.2011, 14:48
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Re: How to deal with eating disorders of teenagers?

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Its for a girl now.... Am I wrong to blame this to the high importance teens place on appereance and looks?
You're right to look for "blame" in the sense of responsibility. As in, what are the factors that led up to the eating disorder. But more likely than not, it's many different factors.

Yes, appearance and looks are an enormous part of it. And this pressure is far greater on women. I'm not saying it doesn't exist for men but comparatively speaking, this pressure is why most sufferers of eating disorders are women. There are other studies suggesting that people with eating disorders are more likely to have been abused or been in abusive households.

And sometimes, there really isn't some climactic event or anything like that to point your finger at. It can be as 'small' as a single comment or as big as years of teasing about your weight.

I grew up in a family that had sit-down dinners every night. Healthy, varied food. Few desserts except for the odd treat. Absolutely no abuse of any kind. I have amazing parents.

What happened is that when I graduated from high school (age 16), I spent a couple of years figuring out what I wanted to do. I worked a lot of jobs that kept me on my feet. I wasn't overweight to start with, but all this extra activity meant I lost around 10lbs without trying or thinking about food. Back then, I never exercised either. Still no issue there. It was a weight loss that probably would have involved regaining the weight later once I wasn't working these jobs.

Where it all went wrong - and yes I can pinpoint it precisely - is when some extended family and friends commented on my weight loss and said that I looked really good. My parents at that point were already saying I could do with gaining the weight back. But all I heard were the compliments from others. And so began a consciousness of my weight, my body and food. It started with little things like cutting out butter on my toast. Or mentally creating a list of good and bad foods. Around that time, I flew out to visit an aunt and uncle. We did a lot of eating out at restaurants, which I couldn't handle because I didn't know exactly what was in the food. So I ordered nothing, despite their questions. I lost another 5lbs in that week but that's the week where I really lost much more mentally. I came home and started measuring out all my food, eating the same thing every day at the same time and constantly weighing myself. I think I was eating around 500 calories a day. My periods faded and then stopped.

There are years more of this and the development of other eating disorders, but I won't go there right now as I'm already writing too much. My point is that an eating disorder for some is based on something very traumatic such as abuse. For others like me, it starts with something quite small like comments about weight. For virtually all of us, I'd say the media does play a role although it's not the only factor.

All sorts of things are cited with eating disorders such as control, appearance, anxiety, depression..the list goes on. At a very basic level though, I think it really comes down to self-esteem.

People who feel good about themselves don't hurt themselves.
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  #28  
Old 26.11.2011, 15:25
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Uni refers to university. For help with eating disorders you should contact the department of psychiatry at the nearest medical school, your pediatrician or your family doctor. Bern and Lausanne are both options. I don't know anyone personally at either, and the specific clinic at Bern looks to be an option. I know nothing about Lausanne...I can't read French.

The important thing is that if you're worried about your child and someone says, "oh, it's normal to diet", you know better.

For general information, a good resource is http://something-fishy.org

Eating disorders are psychiatric in nature and among young women in the US at least, have the highest mortality of any psychiatric disorder. That doesn't mean it's all in your head, an ED is a real illness. There are different types and sometimes the same person can go back and forth between anorexia (restrictive eating) or bulimia (binging and purging) in an effort to loose or maintain weight. And this effort is above and beyond the garden variety dieting -- it's to the point of an all consuming obsession with these weight loss goals and ideals. It may also include abuse of laxatives, caffeine, anything that will speed up the process of elimination or decrease appetite, or obsessive exercise. There are other behaviors that go along with this, but they depend on the individual.

There is a genetic nature to Eating Disorders...they run in families, or families where perhaps depression and anxiety are common. Family environment, media, peer pressure may influence their development, but you have to have a predisposition, and it's a complex genetic issue.

Anorexia and bulimia are increasing, but are still not that common, less than 10% of the population. About 10% of those are male, but that's increasing too. (I haven't checked the stats on this lately, so I might be off). It's also important to note that people of all ages have eating disorders.

To confuse things further, there is also the concept of disordered eating...an obsession with diet and appearance. It will make you miserable, it's unhealthy, and it's a lot more common.

Anyway, I hope you can find a resource to answer your questions, good luck.
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  #29  
Old 26.11.2011, 18:55
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Re: Eating disorder help in Switzerland

Sent email to Dr already...
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  #30  
Old 27.11.2011, 02:15
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Good luck. All the best.
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  #31  
Old 27.11.2011, 09:41
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Re: Eating disorder help in Switzerland

I sincerely hope all goes well for you and your family. All the best.
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  #32  
Old 11.01.2012, 11:52
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Re: Eating disorder help in Switzerland

Hi,

I am treated for eating disorder for almos a year now.

First I went in Fribourg in a special center: La ceptade. They speak French, English and German.

http://www.ceptade.ch/

From now on, I am following my treatment in Zurich in a center specialised in this

http://www.essstoerungen-adipositas.ch/Kontakt.html

I hope this will help you
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