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  #21  
Old 21.04.2021, 22:03
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

And this is the link about the law change in 2013
https://www.ch.ch/en/married-name/
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  #22  
Old 21.04.2021, 23:16
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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Maybe only the diactrics that actually occur in the official languages of Switzerland?

Or any diactric character?
the first one.

Most ex-yu surnames (so that's a recent migration wave) end in -ic and people just know to say -itsch (in the case of german), but they're not translitterated properly.
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  #23  
Old 21.04.2021, 23:29
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

Going to court over a hyphen does seem a bit out there. At least you have good reason to oppose but from the other side it's just ridiculous and unnecessary. Nearly as ridiculous and unnecessary as the law in question.
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  #24  
Old 21.04.2021, 23:38
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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Only if married, otherwise it is ALWAYS the mother's surname.

Tom
I will have to alert the Swiss authorities that my surname (from my dad) is illegal as my parents weren't married when I was born!
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Old 22.04.2021, 08:04
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

I have a double barrel surname (2nd gen) and have had no problems whatsoever. In Switzerland, if I'm addressed by my surname, they generally address me with the first part only.


In short, no issues at all.
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Old 22.04.2021, 09:15
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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I will have to alert the Swiss authorities that my surname (from my dad) is illegal as my parents weren't married when I was born!
Is your mother Swiss? If not, it's not their problem!

Tom
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  #27  
Old 22.04.2021, 09:34
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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Today, yes, years ago, no.

In short, it all depends on the year they were born, and nothing else.

And, no, it's NOT retroactive.

Tom
This thread is not about "years ago", the OP's child is 3½ years old when the current rules already applied. Your statement that "it is ALWAYS the mothers name" was simply wrong.
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  #28  
Old 22.04.2021, 09:38
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

I have a Double-barrelled surname.
OH has also a double-barrelled surname but the other way around.
So wihlst I am called for example Huber-Meier OH is called Meier-Huber.
It confuses people but everything works ok, other than correcting the spelling (adding the hyphen) and being called a few wayward combinations such as Heier or Meber etc all is fine.

Also, we are both swiss citizens who have marryied whilst living abroad.
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  #29  
Old 22.04.2021, 13:25
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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I have a double barrel surname (2nd gen) and have had no problems whatsoever. In Switzerland, if I'm addressed by my surname, they generally address me with the first part only.


In short, no issues at all.
Me too. I have two last names: "Maiden Married". Whereas where I'm from, I would be addressed by both, here it's mostly Maiden I get addressed by. I am fine with this.
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  #30  
Old 22.04.2021, 13:58
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

My baby is just over a year old and he has both parents surnames, in fact he has the male version of my GF surname and my surname. So its not an exact version of her name.

Its on his Swiss birth cert (although he is not Swiss), and so far no issue at all.

I dont see why it would be, and particularly in the modern world. We dont live in closed communities so would think everyone has to like it or lump it.
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  #31  
Old 22.04.2021, 15:06
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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My baby is just over a year old and he has both parents surnames, in fact he has the male version of my GF surname and my surname. So its not an exact version of her name.

Its on his Swiss birth cert (although he is not Swiss), and so far no issue at all.

I dont see why it would be, and particularly in the modern world. We dont live in closed communities so would think everyone has to like it or lump it.
Do both parts count as his surname or, put another way, is his full surname now a double surname? If so, which parent's name is first, and is his name written with or without a hyphen?
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  #32  
Old 22.04.2021, 15:08
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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I dont see why it would be, and particularly in the modern world. We dont live in closed communities so would think everyone has to like it or lump it.
Switzerland has very strict rules on surname options.
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  #33  
Old 22.04.2021, 15:12
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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If I could go back in time, I'd skip the hyphen and have two last names separated by a space. I regularly have problems with online bookings. Some sites accept the hyphen, but most don't. Even then, some sites separate into two words and some mash it all together. Getting important information with the correct, legal name can be a challenge.
This, absolutely.

If one can give a gift to a child (or choose one for oneself as an adult) it is surely a name that just works, with no questions asked, a name that online booking systems can deal with, that registration processes can cope with, that doesn't have too many letters or oddities, with no hyphens anywhere in sight, that humans can spell, that is [fairly easily learn to] pronounce even in a foreign language, and that doesn't cause confusion.

Just think of how much time a parent could save their child, summed over all the forms and all the introductions and applications they have to make, their life long!
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  #34  
Old 22.04.2021, 15:34
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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Do both parts count as his surname or, put another way, is his full surname now a double surname? If so, which parent's name is first, and is his name written with or without a hyphen?
Both names are his surname and there is no hyphen.

We could choose the order of the surnames. His has the male version of his mothers surname first and then my surname. He has 3 birth certs from 3 countries and thats how it is written on all of them. So any one who doesnt accept his surname may as well call him 'Smith' as anything other than his 2 names isnt his surname
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  #35  
Old 22.04.2021, 15:37
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

It occurred to me that there may be separate sets of rules about assigning a child's name, at birth, and changing a child's name, later.

file:///I:/Downloads/mb-name-namenserklaerung-d.pdf
This is an information sheet from the Swiss department of Justice, about changing a child's name.

There, amongst a lot of other info, it states:
Achtung: Falls die von Ihnen gewünschte Namensführung nicht mittels einer der nachstehenden Erklärungen erreicht werden kann, müssen Sie bei der zuständigen Namensänderungsbehörde Ihres Wohnsitzes ein entsprechendes Gesuch um Änderung des Namens
stellen.
Attention: If the name you wish to change cannot be obtained by means of one of the following declarations, you must submit a corresponding application for a change of name to the competent name change authority of your place of residence.


2. Anwendbares Recht
Wenn Sie in der Schweiz wohnen, ist das schweizerische Namensrecht anwendbar.
2. Applicable law
If you live in Switzerland, Swiss law on names is applicable.


Wenn Sie im Ausland wohnen, können Sie eine Namenserklärung nach Schweizer Recht auf der Schweizerischen Vertretung im Ausland abgeben, wenn Sie Schweizer Bürgerin oder Bürger sind (nicht gleichzeitig Bürgerin oder Bürger des Wohnsitzstaates) oder wenn der Name, den Sie mittels einer Namenserklärung ändern möchten, gestützt auf Schweizer Recht gebildet wurde (gilt auch für Ausländerinnen oder Ausländer).
If you live abroad, you can make a name declaration in accordance with Swiss law at the Swiss representation abroad if you are a Swiss citizen (but not also a citizen of your current country of residence) or if the name that you wish to change by means of a name declaration was formed on the basis of Swiss law (also applies to foreign nationals).


Therefore, this seems to me (but I am not a lawyer) to mean, for a parent wishing to change their child's name:
  • Are you currently living in Switzerland?
If no, therefore Swiss law does not automatically apply.
  • Are you a citizen of the country in which you live now?
If no, then you can apply to the Swiss authorities.
If yes, then you can, as a general principal, not appeal to the Swiss authorties for help in most matters, because the local laws of your country of residence (and citizenship) apply to you. However, if the child's name was "formed on the basis of Swiss law", then you can.

The above, however, applies to those wishing to change the child's name. I'm not sure how it would apply to OP who is trying to oppose the other parent's wish to change the child's name.

For a child born to unmarried parents, see, however, the paragraph called: 1.2. Erstes gemeinsames Kind nicht miteinander verheirateter Eltern.
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  #36  
Old 22.04.2021, 15:40
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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Switzerland has very strict rules on surname options.
Yes perhaps. But the Swiss have to accept another countries surname rules if the child doesnt gain nationality through being born here. The Swiss cant just rename someone because it doesnt fit in with their system.
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  #37  
Old 22.04.2021, 16:08
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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Yes perhaps. But the Swiss have to accept another countries surname rules if the child doesnt gain nationality through being born here. The Swiss cant just rename someone because it doesnt fit in with their system.
No child gains nationality by being born here, they get it by being born to a Swiss parent.

Tom
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  #38  
Old 22.04.2021, 16:43
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

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Yes perhaps. But the Swiss have to accept another countries surname rules if the child doesnt gain nationality through being born here. The Swiss cant just rename someone because it doesnt fit in with their system.
The Swiss DO accept names common in the parents original country. Some ex-colleagues, both Irish, wanted to call their daughter “Lilli”. They were refused saying that that spelling was not used in Switzerland or Ireland. So she was named Lilly.
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  #39  
Old 22.04.2021, 18:15
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Re: Living in Switzerland with a double-barrelled surname

My daughter (Swiss born) carries her fathers surname, I changed mine (officially Swiss citizen) back to my non-married name, no problem due to a law change in recent years. In all the paperwork etc. for health insurance, passport etc, the only thing that seems to matter is the AHV no. This doesn’t change, regardless of anything else.

Double barreled, my daughters surname would have been quite a mouthful, so I was happy to leave her surname as her fathers. She had become used to it, even at the early age of 3.5 years at our separation. But I think that your child would easily become used to a different surname at that age.
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