Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Family matters/health
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11.02.2010, 04:20
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 3
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
junco has no particular reputation at present
Adult Child with Special Needs

Hi,

My husband is very interested in a job possibility in Zurich. However, we have a 22 year old with a mental disability whom we would not be comfortable leaving behind in the US. What services and financial supports would be available for an English speaking American in Switzerland? He would probably need a group home, job coaching, etc. Does anybody know of anything that might be available? I don't forsee that he could learn German very easily.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11.02.2010, 16:05
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: la cote
Posts: 2,863
Groaned at 15 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 2,243 Times in 1,264 Posts
runningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

While I don't have any direct experience, I would suspect that this situation could be quite challenging in Switzerland.

I would say that the way disabilities are dealt with here and culture of Switzerland would lead to a very different situation from what you are used to. Generally speaking, like a lot of things here, the responsiblity lies more with the family and not with the state. I can share some examples. I have never known any group homes here. When encountering adult down syndrome people, they are always with their aged parents. My daugher's physiotherapist noted once that certain disablilities are not covered by insurance/disability, thus it is up for the family to pay or they do not get treatment. Where a child is not considered the 'norm' at public school, it is the parent's problem/responsibilty and not the schools. There was a mentally and physically disabled child at my daughter's creche; and while they did the best to provide for her there, she got no special treaments, therapies, or ways to cope with her condition. She never learned to walk or talk by the age of 5.

I would also think that the language issue could be very difficult. Presumably, the services and any job coaching would be in the local language. While there are english speaking people here, basic communication is expected in the local language.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank runningdeer for this useful post:
The following 2 users groan at runningdeer for this post:
  #3  
Old 11.02.2010, 16:56
caz's Avatar
caz caz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tuggen SZ
Posts: 251
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 240 Times in 99 Posts
caz has an excellent reputationcaz has an excellent reputationcaz has an excellent reputationcaz has an excellent reputation
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

I have seen the opposite - I have no direct experience but have a good friend with a disabled child (mentally and physically) and she attends a special school, is collected and returned home, has respite care and has many of her medications covered separately due to her diagnosis. She is now 7. Where I lived in Horgen there was a home and workshop for adults with disabilities - yes several would arrive daily in buses but there was also accomodation for those that lived in and i do not think this is unusual.
http://www.humanitashorgen.ch/

in fact we have bought products from several of this places
another I have details of is the Wohnheim und Werkstatt in Saanen
http://www.alpenruhe.ch/

so although I do not know what the situation will be brining a non german speaking adult with special needs there certainly are lots of places that can help and offer therapies and work and socialisation etc

hth

caz
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank caz for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 11.02.2010, 17:00
Bertrand - Geneva
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Blog Entries: 2
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Difficult situation....

Did you ask to the Swiss Embassy if they could give you some information about that ?
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #5  
Old 11.02.2010, 18:52
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 3
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
junco has no particular reputation at present
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Thanks to all of you! If anyone else has information I'd love to hear it. I'll try the Swiss Embassy.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11.02.2010, 19:02
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 8,141
Groaned at 64 Times in 60 Posts
Thanked 12,980 Times in 4,732 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

You might be able to get some information from Procap which gives advice and help on this sort of question.
Their Homepage is only in French and German but you could try your luck writing to them in English.

You could use this Translation Site to help you get the gist of some of it if you want to look at the various pages.

I hope you find the help you need. Good luck in the search.

Last edited by Longbyt; 11.02.2010 at 19:30.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11.02.2010, 19:28
Oldhand's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,939
Groaned at 20 Times in 19 Posts
Thanked 6,513 Times in 1,989 Posts
Oldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

runningdeer,

I beg to differ. There is a very good net work of support provided by the state for people with disabilities in Switzerland. I am a regular contributor to a state home and workplace for people with handicaps here in my home town Dübendorf. I would ask you politely to make sure of your facts before giving information to people from other countries.

You may find that the child at your daughters creche was there because her parents and the community wanted her to be there.

You may see people with Downs Syndrome with their older parents because they are their parents and not because the state has abandoned them.
I'm getting tired of ill formed information given as gospel on this forum.
__________________
www.thehappynest.ch
Reply With Quote
The following 10 users would like to thank Oldhand for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 11.02.2010, 19:36
Angela-74's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kanton Neuchatel
Posts: 5,738
Groaned at 114 Times in 94 Posts
Thanked 5,665 Times in 2,772 Posts
Angela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond reputeAngela-74 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

I think the problem might be the language... as much as people with disabilities are helped in CH I am not sure an English-only speaker will feel as comfortable.
I would suggest also to talk to your child's physician/therapist about how moving could affect your child and of course contact the embassy for more information, which I am sure they will get for you.

Good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11.02.2010, 19:57
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 8,141
Groaned at 64 Times in 60 Posts
Thanked 12,980 Times in 4,732 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

I couldn't agree with Oldhand more. Because a person has never seen a 'group home' it really doesn't mean that they don't exist. Why should an adult with Down's Syndrome not live with their parents?

I've been in group homes, I've seen children and adults with disabilites who are helped by the state to find apprenticeship places, jobs and accomodation, who have adapted cars, scooters and electric wheelchairs to increase their mobility and other 'gadgets' which make their life slightly easier. It doesn't always run smoothly for the people concerned. Certainly, as the physio says, there will be some disabilities which may 'slip through the net' and sometimes parents have to push to get all the help they are entitled to. However, it doesn't mean help is not there.To imply this is really not helping the OP at all.
__________________
Longbyt
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Longbyt for this useful post:
  #10  
Old 11.02.2010, 20:09
Oldhand's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,939
Groaned at 20 Times in 19 Posts
Thanked 6,513 Times in 1,989 Posts
Oldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Quote:
View Post
I couldn't agree with Oldhand more. Because a person has never seen a 'group home' it really doesn't mean that they don't exist. Why should an adult with Down's Syndrome not live with their parents?

I've been in group homes, I've seen children and adults with disabilites who are helped by the state to find apprenticeship places, jobs and accomodation, who have adapted cars, scooters and electric wheelchairs to increase their mobility and other 'gadgets' which make their life slightly easier. It doesn't always run smoothly for the people concerned. Certainly, as the physio says, there will be some disabilities which may 'slip through the net' and sometimes parents have to push to get all the help they are entitled to. However, it doesn't mean help is not there.To imply this is really not helping the OP at all.
And that's from a veteran swimming coach for people with disabilities here in Switzerland. Remember people think before you spout subjective crap.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11.02.2010, 20:11
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 8,141
Groaned at 64 Times in 60 Posts
Thanked 12,980 Times in 4,732 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Quote:
View Post
And that's from a veteran swimming coach for people with disabilities here in Switzerland.
I especially like the 'veteran' bit! Thanks for the compliment anyway.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11.02.2010, 20:12
Oldhand's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,939
Groaned at 20 Times in 19 Posts
Thanked 6,513 Times in 1,989 Posts
Oldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Quote:
View Post
I especially like the 'veteran' bit! Thanks for the compliment anyway.
Sheesh glad you liked it, it was a compliment.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11.02.2010, 20:18
swisspea's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: From one side of lake Zurich to the other...
Posts: 5,606
Groaned at 33 Times in 22 Posts
Thanked 5,211 Times in 2,495 Posts
swisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond reputeswisspea has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Same with Oldhand...

There are several children who are integrated into my children's school with disabilities - they do get out-of-school support like physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy - through the children's hospital...talking to their parents, there are not enough hours in the day to fit all the ordinary family stuff in and school and therapy hours as well...

At the end of the street there is a department of the hospital/social department which has a day-programme for adults with intellectual disabilities - we usually see them once a week, heading out in the morning to somewhere, as we are arriving at school and seem to return around the same time that we pick our kids up from school.

There is also a work crew who are adults with intellectual disabilities (all men) who are supervised/organised and clean up the local park - sweeping, clearing the bins, raking over the gardens and sandpit and clearing the play areas of rubbish and leaves...

There is also an established network of social services. Your biggest problem will be accessing services in German, but in Zurich at least there are plenty of people who are quite capable in English.

Does your son have a specifically identified disability or 'syndrome' ? Perhaps they have an association in your home country, and a counterpart association in Switzerland - that was our first stop when finding a support network for our son, who arrived with diabetes...and also we got our specialist in Australia to email a referral to her colleague in Zurich - who happened to be the professor at the university...and he was very happy to have us as a patient (and all the doctors at the diabetes unit know our son as the 'Australian kid'...
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank swisspea for this useful post:
  #14  
Old 11.02.2010, 20:23
Jim2007's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Kt. Bern
Posts: 2,802
Groaned at 55 Times in 51 Posts
Thanked 3,037 Times in 1,532 Posts
Jim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond reputeJim2007 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Quote:
View Post
Hi,

My husband is very interested in a job possibility in Zurich. However, we have a 22 year old with a mental disability whom we would not be comfortable leaving behind in the US. What services and financial supports would be available for an English speaking American in Switzerland? He would probably need a group home, job coaching, etc. Does anybody know of anything that might be available? I don't forsee that he could learn German very easily.

Thanks!
There are very good facilities here to support people with special needs (my son being one of them), however they are geared to the local community and I expect it would be almost impossible to find anything substantial in English.

Most of the stuff is not covered by health insurance, but is paid instead by the state, however in many cases to qualify for it the person would need to have been diagnosed in childhood or in their teens, depending on the type of needs.

I would suggest you contact the Swiss Embassy in your country to see what they can offer. But to I would not expect it is going to be a lot, if you need it in English.

Good luck with that,

Jim
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Jim2007 for this useful post:
  #15  
Old 11.02.2010, 20:32
the.frollein's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 265
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 223 Times in 111 Posts
the.frollein has an excellent reputationthe.frollein has an excellent reputationthe.frollein has an excellent reputationthe.frollein has an excellent reputation
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

...............

Last edited by the.frollein; 11.02.2010 at 20:33. Reason: Sorry, duplicate posting - computer problems my end
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11.02.2010, 20:32
the.frollein's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 265
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 223 Times in 111 Posts
the.frollein has an excellent reputationthe.frollein has an excellent reputationthe.frollein has an excellent reputationthe.frollein has an excellent reputation
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Having worked in a group home myself, albeit many years ago, I can confirm that (of course) such things exist in Switzerland! There is also a good network of care possibilities and support in place, at all levels.

However, I suspect the difficulty will be finding a placement for an English-speaker... this might prove an insurmountable problem. Do investigate the link to Procap, which Longbyt gives above. Good luck, and I do hope you find the information you need!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11.02.2010, 22:42
Mrs. Doolittle's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Aargau
Posts: 5,777
Groaned at 150 Times in 108 Posts
Thanked 6,663 Times in 3,159 Posts
Mrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Quote:
View Post
Hi,

My husband is very interested in a job possibility in Zurich. However, we have a 22 year old with a mental disability whom we would not be comfortable leaving behind in the US. What services and financial supports would be available for an English speaking American in Switzerland? He would probably need a group home, job coaching, etc. Does anybody know of anything that might be available? I don't forsee that he could learn German very easily.

Thanks!
Perhaps you don't want to make an issue out of this with the employer, but eventually the employer will become aware of the situation when it comes to requesting permits. Typically you would not be able to request a residency permit for a 22 year old as at this age a child is no longer a dependent, but yours is a special situation. So, my suggestion would be to ask the HR dept for a list of resources. If they are reluctant to help you, you might want to reconsider the offer. You are going to need the employer on your side for assistance with the permits.

The other possibility is to have your husband accept the position and live here alone. Long distance marriages are not so rare. These decisions are never easy but one has to carefully weigh the impact on everyone's quality of life.

I hope you find a solution.
__________________

Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Mrs. Doolittle for this useful post:
  #18  
Old 12.02.2010, 16:59
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 3
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
junco has no particular reputation at present
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

You are all wonderful! Thank you so much for the help!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 14.02.2010, 10:55
Sky's Avatar
Sky Sky is offline
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Somewhere special far away
Posts: 3,773
Groaned at 43 Times in 29 Posts
Thanked 5,348 Times in 2,108 Posts
Sky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

Quote:
View Post
There are very good facilities here to support people with special needs (my son being one of them), however they are geared to the local community and I expect it would be almost impossible to find anything substantial in English.

Most of the stuff is not covered by health insurance, but is paid instead by the state, however in many cases to qualify for it the person would need to have been diagnosed in childhood or in their teens, depending on the type of needs.

I would suggest you contact the Swiss Embassy in your country to see what they can offer. But to I would not expect it is going to be a lot, if you need it in English.

Good luck with that,

Jim
I believe that may be the issue. The OP's child is 22. Would he qualify for AI (invalid insurance) for congenital health issues, arriving in Switzerland as a young adult ?
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 14.02.2010, 11:28
Papa Goose's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Ägeri
Posts: 3,662
Groaned at 233 Times in 190 Posts
Thanked 4,105 Times in 1,766 Posts
Papa Goose has a reputation beyond reputePapa Goose has a reputation beyond reputePapa Goose has a reputation beyond reputePapa Goose has a reputation beyond reputePapa Goose has a reputation beyond reputePapa Goose has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Adult Child with Special Needs

I think that people with disabilities are well cared for here in CH, and Oldhand an Longbyt would be in a postion to offer more detail than I.

I think language would be a mjor issue, as whist many Swiss do speak English, you would be reliant on finding a facility that could provide the levels of care required for your son in a non-Swiss language, which may not be so easy. I think the permit issue may also be thorny, as if he's in a home you would not be providing care so could it be argued that he is not actually dependant upon you but the carers in the home. I'm not sure where he would stand from the insurance prospective to cover those bills, but I know my disbility is excluded from cover, so funding the care would maybe fall directly upon you, and this would be sizeable I fear.
__________________
How do you know if a Frenchman has been in your garden.... your rubbish is gone, your dog is pregnant.... but at least your cabbages are pest free
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Papa Goose for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
embarrassing moments as an adult. Sutter General off-topic 233 07.03.2012 15:33
A smacked child ‘is a successful child’ Nil Family matters/health 122 17.04.2010 10:06
Retirement in CH with adult child SwissBlis Permits/visas/government 11 09.07.2009 10:18
Child in school fight - possible injury to other child swisscath Family matters/health 16 29.05.2008 13:08
Renting adult carseat? tala Transportation/driving 4 13.06.2007 18:15


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 19:50.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0