Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Finance/banking/taxation  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 31.07.2012, 20:48
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
Max Keiser just (ironically) posted this on Facebook... Thought my fellow EFers would like it:

I've got a nicer one



Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 03.08.2012, 13:54
kiwiguy08's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Horgen
Posts: 1,336
Groaned at 45 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 1,036 Times in 527 Posts
kiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

I thought all this work by the IRS was supposed to raise billions and billions of dollars in additional income.

According to Wikipedia; FATCA is supposed to raise a relativeley paltry $800 million per year.

Seems kind of penny wise pound foolish...especially considering the prospect of pissing of thousands of citizens, tons of extra forms to process, the exposure to retaliation from foreign countries. (like Brazil)

However, now I understand them completely...they need money to keep covering up their mistakes.

IRS may have issued more than $5 billion in false tax returns
Quote:
For example, investigators found one single address in Michigan that was used to file 2,137 separate tax returns seeking a total of more $3.3 million in refunds. In other cases, hundreds of refunds were deposited into the same bank account.
In addition, illegal aliens got $4.2 billion in child credit for children (not theirs) living in Mexico and reported with a mexican adress!

LINK

They sent $130 million to prison inmates who had no income and didnt report any.

LINK

But hey they spent 5 billion dollars to upgrade their computer systems...which was in 2007. The changes still aren't optimal because paper formas are still entered manually...lol

LINK
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 03.08.2012, 14:23
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: suburbs of LA, USA
Posts: 934
Groaned at 11 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 873 Times in 439 Posts
BrianJW has a reputation beyond reputeBrianJW has a reputation beyond reputeBrianJW has a reputation beyond reputeBrianJW has a reputation beyond repute
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
I thought all this work by the IRS was supposed to raise billions and billions of dollars in additional income.

According to Wikipedia; FATCA is supposed to raise a relativeley paltry $800 million per year.

Seems kind of penny wise pound foolish...especially considering the prospect of pissing of thousands of citizens, tons of extra forms to process, the exposure to retaliation from foreign countries. (like Brazil)

However, now I understand them completely...they need money to keep covering up their mistakes.

IRS may have issued more than $5 billion in false tax returns
In addition, illegal aliens got $4.2 billion in child credit for children (not theirs) living in Mexico and reported with a mexican adress!

LINK

They sent $130 million to prison inmates who had no income and didnt report any.

LINK

But hey they spent 5 billion dollars to upgrade their computer systems...which was in 2007. The changes still aren't optimal because paper formas are still entered manually...lol

LINK
Can I groan (at the IRS)
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 03.08.2012, 17:19
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

The more I read these forums on US citizenship-based taxation, the more I am convinced that a US passport is a stigma.

I am very curious to hear from US/CH citizens: Why do you still have a US passport? If I had a Swiss passport, my US would be tossed away in a heartbeat.

A Swiss Passport gives you the same, if not even more benefits, than a US passport, such as:

-More visa-free travel rights
-No home country tax returns to file if abroad
-Neutral country, no criminal penalties for violating travel bans or sanctions (you can literally go anywhere you want and do business with anyone you want)
-Automatic residency and access to EU/EFTA job market (31 countries)
-Neutral country, nobody has anything against you as they have their gold and billions in your banks
-CH is economically more stable, good retirement and social system, no fiscal problems.
-Education in CH maybe not as prestigious, but you can study in the US without a US passport.

So, why is a US passport worth it? Swiss is way better alone.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 03.08.2012, 17:35
JBZ86's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Zurich and various mountains
Posts: 3,709
Groaned at 520 Times in 337 Posts
Thanked 4,258 Times in 1,944 Posts
JBZ86 has a reputation beyond reputeJBZ86 has a reputation beyond reputeJBZ86 has a reputation beyond reputeJBZ86 has a reputation beyond reputeJBZ86 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
The more I read these forums on US citizenship-based taxation, the more I am convinced that a US passport is a stigma.

I am very curious to hear from US/CH citizens: Why do you still have a US passport? If I had a Swiss passport, my US would be tossed away in a heartbeat.

A Swiss Passport gives you the same, if not even more benefits, than a US passport, such as:

-More visa-free travel rights
-No home country tax returns to file if abroad
-Neutral country, no criminal penalties for violating travel bans or sanctions (you can literally go anywhere you want and do business with anyone you want)
-Automatic residency and access to EU/EFTA job market (31 countries)
-Neutral country, nobody has anything against you as they have their gold and billions in your banks
-CH is economically more stable, good retirement and social system, no fiscal problems.
-Education in CH maybe not as prestigious, but you can study in the US without a US passport.

So, why is a US passport worth it? Swiss is way better alone.
Because it is the greatest country in the world, land of the free
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank JBZ86 for this useful post:
  #66  
Old 03.08.2012, 17:37
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: suburbs of LA, USA
Posts: 934
Groaned at 11 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 873 Times in 439 Posts
BrianJW has a reputation beyond reputeBrianJW has a reputation beyond reputeBrianJW has a reputation beyond reputeBrianJW has a reputation beyond repute
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
The more I read these forums on US citizenship-based taxation, the more I am convinced that a US passport is a stigma.

I am very curious to hear from US/CH citizens: Why do you still have a US passport? If I had a Swiss passport, my US would be tossed away in a heartbeat.

A Swiss Passport gives you the same, if not even more benefits, than a US passport, such as:

-More visa-free travel rights
-No home country tax returns to file if abroad
-Neutral country, no criminal penalties for violating travel bans or sanctions (you can literally go anywhere you want and do business with anyone you want)
-Automatic residency and access to EU/EFTA job market (31 countries)
-Neutral country, nobody has anything against you as they have their gold and billions in your banks
-CH is economically more stable, good retirement and social system, no fiscal problems.
-Education in CH maybe not as prestigious, but you can study in the US without a US passport.

So, why is a US passport worth it? Swiss is way better alone.
If you ever want to live in the US a passport is VERY handy. Otherwise you need a US spouse, an in demand skill with an employer willing to sponsor you (not all that easy), enough money to invest to warrant a green card (significant cash). I dont know of any benefits other than the ability to live there and shorter lines at the airport.

Last edited by BrianJW; 03.08.2012 at 17:59.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 03.08.2012, 18:08
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
View Post
If you ever want to live in the US a passport is VERY handy. Otherwise you need a US spouse, an in demand skill with an employer willing to sponsor you (not all that easy), enough money to invest to warrant a green card (significant cash). I dont know of any benefits other than the ability to live there and shorter lines at the airport.
Sometimes the lines aren't shorter.
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 03.08.2012, 18:21
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
If you ever want to live in the US a passport is VERY handy. Otherwise you need a US spouse, an in demand skill with an employer willing to sponsor you (not all that easy), enough money to invest to warrant a green card (significant cash). I dont know of any benefits other than the ability to live there and shorter lines at the airport.
You can easily work and live in the US if you have a Canadian Passport under the NAFTA Professional (TN) Visa program.

Canadians don't even need visas actually, they just show up at the US border and:

-Request TN status
-Bring copy of professional qualification that falls under the TN criteria (http://canada.usembassy.gov/visas/do...-by-nafta.html)
-Provide letter of job offer (job offer must fall within TN criteria)
-Pay a 50 USD fee

Et voilà!

In theory, the TN status can be extended indefinitely as lond as the Port of Entry officer is in a good mood (and there are hundreds of port of entries), thus it can be a de facto green card.

Looks like the best passport combination in the world is Swiss-Canadian !

And you can get a Canadian passport in 3 years!

Last edited by brusch; 03.08.2012 at 18:38.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank for this useful post:
  #69  
Old 06.08.2012, 10:23
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Aargau
Posts: 111
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 143 Times in 51 Posts
Dual US/Swiss Citizen has made some interesting contributions
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
The more I read these forums on US citizenship-based taxation, the more I am convinced that a US passport is a stigma.

I am very curious to hear from US/CH citizens: Why do you still have a US passport? If I had a Swiss passport, my US would be tossed away in a heartbeat.

A Swiss Passport gives you the same, if not even more benefits, than a US passport, such as:

-More visa-free travel rights
-No home country tax returns to file if abroad
-Neutral country, no criminal penalties for violating travel bans or sanctions (you can literally go anywhere you want and do business with anyone you want)
-Automatic residency and access to EU/EFTA job market (31 countries)
-Neutral country, nobody has anything against you as they have their gold and billions in your banks
-CH is economically more stable, good retirement and social system, no fiscal problems.
-Education in CH maybe not as prestigious, but you can study in the US without a US passport.

So, why is a US passport worth it? Swiss is way better alone.
There are several reasons. Some people may want to have the possibility to live in the US. This is unlikely for me as the quality of life is better here. For me I have a hope (maybe a false one) that the poor treatment by the US of its expats will improve. I'm also hoping that the US will change to a residence based taxation instead of the current citizenship-based as proposed by American Citizens Abroad. I think however that there is a tipping point if the situation keeps deteriorating.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 06.08.2012, 11:05
kiwiguy08's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Horgen
Posts: 1,336
Groaned at 45 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 1,036 Times in 527 Posts
kiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
The more I read these forums on US citizenship-based taxation, the more I am convinced that a US passport is a stigma.

I am very curious to hear from US/CH citizens: Why do you still have a US passport? If I had a Swiss passport, my US would be tossed away in a heartbeat.

A Swiss Passport gives you the same, if not even more benefits, than a US passport, such as:

-More visa-free travel rights
-No home country tax returns to file if abroad
-Neutral country, no criminal penalties for violating travel bans or sanctions (you can literally go anywhere you want and do business with anyone you want)
-Automatic residency and access to EU/EFTA job market (31 countries)
-Neutral country, nobody has anything against you as they have their gold and billions in your banks
-CH is economically more stable, good retirement and social system, no fiscal problems.
-Education in CH maybe not as prestigious, but you can study in the US without a US passport.

So, why is a US passport worth it? Swiss is way better alone.
It is a difficult concept to explain but I will speak from my opinion.

-No matter how long you have a Swiss passport, you will never be a Swiss. You will never completely fit into the culture here. For some that's less important but I like feeling "home" when I am in the US. Even though I wasn't born in the US, nobody really cares. I don't feel different because I dont have an Anglicized name. If I commit a crime, my name will be in the newspaper and not "30 year old (insert nationality).

-You can vote for the (world) president. To me this has lost some luster but I still find it enticing

-If I make a fortune out here, I can still go back there chill out in a McMansion on a huge tract of land. The US is still the best country to live in when you have money.
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 06.08.2012, 11:07
HollidayG's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Kanton Zürich
Posts: 3,038
Groaned at 50 Times in 35 Posts
Thanked 1,180 Times in 738 Posts
HollidayG has an excellent reputationHollidayG has an excellent reputationHollidayG has an excellent reputationHollidayG has an excellent reputation
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Not everyone is eligible for the Swiss passport. It takes a MINIMUM
of 12 years, and there are additional Cantonal rules depending where
you live.

In Zug, for example, you have to live in the Canton 10 of the
last 12 years to receive the Swiss passport.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 06.08.2012, 15:30
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
It is a difficult concept to explain but I will speak from my opinion.

-No matter how long you have a Swiss passport, you will never be a Swiss. You will never completely fit into the culture here. For some that's less important but I like feeling "home" when I am in the US. Even though I wasn't born in the US, nobody really cares. I don't feel different because I dont have an Anglicized name. If I commit a crime, my name will be in the newspaper and not "30 year old (insert nationality).

-You can vote for the (world) president. To me this has lost some luster but I still find it enticing

-If I make a fortune out here, I can still go back there chill out in a McMansion on a huge tract of land. The US is still the best country to live in when you have money.
1) US has it's own integration issues, especially illegals; this is not a "Swiss Phenomenon". Considering I have spent less than a third of my life in the US (I wasn't even born or raised there), I hardly feel or behave American. In all honesty I feel like a foreigner everywhere I go, even in my country of birth.

2) Absentee ballots sent from outside the US sometimes are not count. It doesn't matter who votes, it matters who counts the votes.

3) If you make a fortune and you really want to live in the US (I personally wouldn't), you can win a green card and immigrate under the Green Card investment program. There is no law (thus yet enforced) that prohibits those that renounced from re-immigrating or, later on, re-naturalizing.
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 06.08.2012, 15:52
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
Not everyone is eligible for the Swiss passport. It takes a MINIMUM
of 12 years, and there are additional Cantonal rules depending where
you live.

In Zug, for example, you have to live in the Canton 10 of the
last 12 years to receive the Swiss passport.
http://www.ejpd.admin.ch/ejpd/en/hom...tzfristen.html

5 years in Canton Zoug actually.

Draft law is being debated to reduce federal residency requirement from 12 to 8 years, only C Permit holders can apply and cantonal requirements can, at max, be 3 years only.
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 06.08.2012, 16:01
kiwiguy08's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Horgen
Posts: 1,336
Groaned at 45 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 1,036 Times in 527 Posts
kiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
1) US has it's own integration issues, especially illegals; this is not a "Swiss Phenomenon". Considering I have spent less than a third of my life in the US (I wasn't even born or raised there), I hardly feel or behave American. In all honesty I feel like a foreigner everywhere I go, even in my country of birth.

2) Absentee ballots sent from outside the US sometimes are not count. It doesn't matter who votes, it matters who counts the votes.

3) If you make a fortune and you really want to live in the US (I personally wouldn't), you can win a green card and immigrate under the Green Card investment program. There is no law (thus yet enforced) that prohibits those that renounced from re-immigrating or, later on, re-naturalizing.
1) I am simply stating my feeling. I was an immigrant int he US and now I feel more American than my original nationality. My point is that integration in the USA is easier if you wish to. Illegal aliens of course cannot integrate effectively.

2) I have voted from abroad once so far and I received a confirmation that my vote was received and noted.

3) Who needs all that paperwork and hassle. I went through it once already and would not do it again
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 06.08.2012, 16:07
HollidayG's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Kanton Zürich
Posts: 3,038
Groaned at 50 Times in 35 Posts
Thanked 1,180 Times in 738 Posts
HollidayG has an excellent reputationHollidayG has an excellent reputationHollidayG has an excellent reputationHollidayG has an excellent reputation
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
http://www.ejpd.admin.ch/ejpd/en/hom...tzfristen.html

5 years in Canton Zoug actually.

Draft law is being debated to reduce federal residency requirement from 12 to 8 years, only C Permit holders can apply and cantonal requirements can, at max, be 3 years only.
The law must have changed in recent years for Canton Zug because I
looked this up recently.

It is still a draft law, in the US known as a bill, so the 12 years still applies
regardless. Additionally, I have lived in several Cantons during my 9 year stay here.
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 06.08.2012, 19:34
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
There are several reasons. Some people may want to have the possibility to live in the US. This is unlikely for me as the quality of life is better here. For me I have a hope (maybe a false one) that the poor treatment by the US of its expats will improve. I'm also hoping that the US will change to a residence based taxation instead of the current citizenship-based as proposed by American Citizens Abroad. I think however that there is a tipping point if the situation keeps deteriorating.
I wish I could share your optimism.

Some US laws, unfortunately, are very irrational and the tax code is one of them. Who would have thought that citizenship-base taxation, a Civil War era legislation enacted during the 1860s to persuade Americans in the north against fleeing the country to the relative safety of Europe, would have survived until today with no relevancy to it's original purpose.

Take the 1974 Vanik Jackson Ammendment which denied normal trade relations with the Soviet Union (and Russia today) due to restrictions on emigration of religious minorities. Ever since the USSR dissolved, all have been free to enter an exit Russia, but this legislation continues to exist.

Why? Politics.

Congressmen are brokers representing the most important strata of their overall constituents, but never the majority of interests of their constituents. Why? Winner-take-all system in American elections ensures a lot of interests are ignored and have little voice or representation.

Congressmen also see citizenship-based taxation as a way to promote the myth to their constituents that those with financial interests abroad are tax dodgers who should "pay their fair share", conveniently ignoring the fact that many abroad are not US residents who do not benefit at all from US government services. Hence according to Lockean Natural Law , which is the ultimate founding principle of US Constitutional Law and the Declaration of Independence, US citizens who are not US residents are being taxed and subject to extortion without representation or benefits derived from such taxation.

Do I see citizenship-based taxation being repealed anytime soon? With this political climate and this winner-take-all representation, I doubt it. Congress can't even agree on fixing today's fiscal problems (which are worse in the US than the more solver EU countries). Add in the demographics of a retiring baby boomer population and the US seems like a very bleak and unattractive place to live in for the coming decades. Taxes will go up and a social spending will go down; 1 in 7 American live on food stamps today (that's 3rd world, period), repealing citizenship-based taxation will benefit no politician.

The American Dream is just that, a Dream. But getting that Passport can turn it into a nightmare if you decide to leave the "Dream".
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank for this useful post:
  #77  
Old 06.08.2012, 20:53
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Züri
Posts: 220
Groaned at 2 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 182 Times in 97 Posts
circe is considered knowledgeablecirce is considered knowledgeablecirce is considered knowledgeable
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
Draft law is being debated to reduce federal residency requirement from 12 to 8 years, only C Permit holders can apply and cantonal requirements can, at max, be 3 years only.
I heard about this but never found any more information. Is this attached to the results of some government study? Is there a timeline for when they would vote on it? Any links with more info?
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 06.08.2012, 21:00
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Fribourg
Posts: 119
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 36 Times in 29 Posts
jjrb37 has earned some respectjjrb37 has earned some respect
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

So what if you ignore the letter and don't pay it??...not that I'm advocating this, but if you don't plan to return to the US, and have nothing there to hold on to, then what?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank jjrb37 for this useful post:
  #79  
Old 06.08.2012, 22:58
kiwiguy08's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Horgen
Posts: 1,336
Groaned at 45 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 1,036 Times in 527 Posts
kiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond reputekiwiguy08 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
I wish I could share your optimism.

Some US laws, unfortunately, are very irrational and the tax code is one of them. Who would have thought that citizenship-base taxation, a Civil War era legislation enacted during the 1860s to persuade Americans in the north against fleeing the country to the relative safety of Europe, would have survived until today with no relevancy to it's original purpose.

Take the 1974 Vanik Jackson Ammendment which denied normal trade relations with the Soviet Union (and Russia today) due to restrictions on emigration of religious minorities. Ever since the USSR dissolved, all have been free to enter an exit Russia, but this legislation continues to exist.

Why? Politics.

Congressmen are brokers representing the most important strata of their overall constituents, but never the majority of interests of their constituents. Why? Winner-take-all system in American elections ensures a lot of interests are ignored and have little voice or representation.

Congressmen also see citizenship-based taxation as a way to promote the myth to their constituents that those with financial interests abroad are tax dodgers who should "pay their fair share", conveniently ignoring the fact that many abroad are not US residents who do not benefit at all from US government services. Hence according to Lockean Natural Law , which is the ultimate founding principle of US Constitutional Law and the Declaration of Independence, US citizens who are not US residents are being taxed and subject to extortion without representation or benefits derived from such taxation.

Do I see citizenship-based taxation being repealed anytime soon? With this political climate and this winner-take-all representation, I doubt it. Congress can't even agree on fixing today's fiscal problems (which are worse in the US than the more solver EU countries). Add in the demographics of a retiring baby boomer population and the US seems like a very bleak and unattractive place to live in for the coming decades. Taxes will go up and a social spending will go down; 1 in 7 American live on food stamps today (that's 3rd world, period), repealing citizenship-based taxation will benefit no politician.

The American Dream is just that, a Dream. But getting that Passport can turn it into a nightmare if you decide to leave the "Dream".
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank kiwiguy08 for this useful post:
  #80  
Old 06.08.2012, 23:12
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: IRS letter! Unexpected Bill

Quote:
View Post
I heard about this but never found any more information. Is this attached to the results of some government study? Is there a timeline for when they would vote on it? Any links with more info?
It is still being debated.

The Federal Commission for Migration Issues has reviewed it and has found some problems with it:
http://www.ekm.admin.ch/de/themen/aktuelle_debatten.php

Reducing the residency requirement from 12 years to 8 years is not identified as a problem, it is actually welcomed; the main focus should be on how integrated a foreigner is rather than how long he has lived in Switzerland (hence, the requirement that a foreigner have a C Permit before applying for naturalization is also seen as a shortcoming).

A link to the legislation can be found here:
http://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/bfm/...htsgesetz.html

Latest update I could find is that the debate on the National Council has been postponed due to the new composition of the Council, but it will happen in the next session:
http://www.20min.ch/schweiz/news/story/17240024

I have a feeling this may be put forward in a Volksabstimmung. Fingers crossed!
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Unexpected Bill from Citycable Lausanne ShaysLou TV/internet/telephone 15 31.01.2012 22:24
Private radio??? [Unexpected letter from Billag] Mirabelle TV/internet/telephone 15 05.10.2011 20:34
Unexpected trip to Istanbul Lisa in Schweiz General off-topic 32 05.09.2011 15:22
Unexpected invoice Itzoe Complaints corner 22 17.06.2011 21:24
joined 'badoo' - received unexpected replies! mibl General off-topic 25 19.03.2011 02:21


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:51.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0