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Old 28.06.2011, 11:53
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Cream cheese for Frosting?



Hello Friends,

Can someone tell me where to buy cream cheese for making icing for cakes? If it is available in Migros or coop, in what name??

Thanks in advance.
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Old 28.06.2011, 11:59
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

I use philadelphia for cream cheese icing (also for cheesecakes) - can get it in the coop in the normal cheese section (probably migros, I don't shop there).
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Old 28.06.2011, 12:07
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

The German word is Frischkäse or Doppelrahm Frischkäse or Dänischer Frischkäse. Exact same thing as cream cheese. Migros even has an M-Budget version in 300 gram packs.
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Old 28.06.2011, 12:12
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

Coop has it. You won't miss it.
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Old 28.06.2011, 12:15
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

Marscapone is quite widely available too.


Marscapone is the same thing, isn't it? I've never had it, but always thought that it sounds marvelous.
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Old 28.06.2011, 12:23
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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Marscapone is quite widely available too.


Marscapone is the same thing, isn't it? I've never had it, but always thought that it sounds marvelous.
No, mascarpone is a bit different as it tends to be softer, sweeter, richer and tangier. They are often used in the stead of the other but they aren't the same. Given that the mascarpone around here is so good, I'd use it for frosting with a slight adjustment to the amount of sugar.

The philly cream cheese here is also a bit off...am I the only yankee who finds it so? It's a bit...grainy? Not sure how to define the strange taste/texture in it.
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Old 24.01.2016, 13:58
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

The cream cheese or Frischkäse here is the one that is spreadable. Not the one in blocks (like in US). If you use it as it is, your icing consistency will be very much like a liquid. But, you could do the trick by draining the water inside the creamcheese and store the icing in the fridge for a few hours before using it.
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Old 25.11.2020, 15:11
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

I'm a bit late joining this, but have just gone through the same issue, and now realise why some of my past cooking efforts have failed miserably.

As others have noted, the spreadable cheeses here seem to be made spreadable by adding water. This tends to leave things cooked with them a bit....watery.

I've gotten around this by hanging Frischkäse (I use the Migros one) in cheesecloth (available in the baby section of Migros or coop) overnight and giving it a bit of squeezing. That can easily get rid of 20 to 30 percent of the weight in water.

Obviously, this is all a bit of a fuss and only suitable for freaks. But in case there are other freaks out there, hopefully this is helpful.
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Old 25.11.2020, 15:17
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

Gala semi-soft cheese (made by Emmi) is the closest I've found to the American brick-style Philadelphia cream cheese: relatively firm and a bit salty. I've baked several New York-style cheesecakes with success. The drawbacks are that it's a bit expensive to purchase a large amount of it, and it's a pain to remove the metallic wrapping from each portion. (Top tip: remove it while the cheese is straight out of the fridge and still firm, if the cheese softens a bit it gets messy real fast.)


Available at Coop, Micros, and often Denner. Maybe others as well, it's pretty common.


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Old 25.11.2020, 16:06
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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I'm a bit late joining this, but have just gone through the same issue, and now realise why some of my past cooking efforts have failed miserably.

As others have noted, the spreadable cheeses here seem to be made spreadable by adding water. This tends to leave things cooked with them a bit....watery.
Not sure how much it's changed since this thread was last active but I'm pretty sure that Philadelphia is now generally available, and Kiri a la Creme much more so. I've seen them both in Lidl, so I'm guessing they must not be unusual in the mainstream food shops.
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Old 25.11.2020, 16:17
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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Not sure how much it's changed since this thread was last active but I'm pretty sure that Philadelphia is now generally available, and Kiri a la Creme much more so. I've seen them both in Lidl, so I'm guessing they must not be unusual in the mainstream food shops.

Aaaaargh. That stuff is not proper cream cheese, if you read the whole thread (or know a few things about cream cheese) you'd realize that this has been a problem for a lot of people. They purchase a tub of something called Philadelphia cream cheese (thinking it's the real deal) and use it in a recipe with disastrous results because it is too soft and watery: real cream cheese is relativley firm and comes in a brick shape, similar to butter. It reminds me of the classic debates about whether or not you can purchase brown sugar here: you can buy brown-coloured sugar in standard Swiss shops, but is not at all the same product as is sold in most of the English-speaking world.


Trust me about the Gala recommendation, it works perfectly in recipes requiring standard brick-style cream cheese.
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Old 25.11.2020, 17:18
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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Aaaaargh. That stuff is not proper cream cheese, if you read the whole thread....
I read the whole thread and I still have a question. Can you give me an example of recipe that doesn't work with, for example Migros Frischkäse?
Personally I really like the taste of it (slightly more sour), so I usually choose it instead of Philadelphia, Moscarpone etc. And it works well in any recipe I have tried, the only thing is, you need to fold it in and not mix with other ingredients.
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Old 25.11.2020, 17:25
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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I'm a bit late joining this, but have just gone through the same issue, and now realise why some of my past cooking efforts have failed miserably.

As others have noted, the spreadable cheeses here seem to be made spreadable by adding water. This tends to leave things cooked with them a bit....watery.

I've gotten around this by hanging Frischkäse (I use the Migros one) in cheesecloth (available in the baby section of Migros or coop) overnight and giving it a bit of squeezing. That can easily get rid of 20 to 30 percent of the weight in water.

Obviously, this is all a bit of a fuss and only suitable for freaks. But in case there are other freaks out there, hopefully this is helpful.
I am all for a bit of a fuss and only suitable for freaks!

But, tbh, I prefer quark/séré than the alternatives, it's cheaper too. Mix in one philadelphia for firmness and there you go. I know, not fussy nor freaky, but quark is a gem. It's simple and no additives.
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Old 25.11.2020, 17:37
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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I am all for a bit of a fuss and only suitable for freaks!

But, tbh, I prefer quark/séré than the alternatives, it's cheaper too. Mix in one philadelphia for firmness and there you go. I know, not fussy nor freaky, but quark is a gem. It's simple and no additives.
Haven't tried cooking with quark...Sounds like an excuse for a cheesecake :-)
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Old 25.11.2020, 17:50
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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Haven't tried cooking with quark...Sounds like an excuse for a cheesecake :-)

Try the Gala and report back.
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Old 25.11.2020, 19:59
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

I've always found frischkase to be much more sour than Philadelphia cream cheese. But I always buy the lactose-free frischkase, so maybe that's why.
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Old 27.11.2020, 11:37
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

By draining the water I assume you mean squeezing the cream cheese through a cheese cloth or the like? There's no water in the container, it's just much softer as it is spreadable than the block we used in the US for the icing
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Old 27.11.2020, 13:08
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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By draining the water I assume you mean squeezing the cream cheese through a cheese cloth or the like? There's no water in the container, it's just much softer as it is spreadable than the block we used in the US for the icing
It is probably the same process as for making "Greek" yogurt out of ordinary yogurt or preparing ricotta for Gnudi, or faking Labneh out of goat yogurt:
- you put a cheese cloth in a strainer
- you put yogurt / ricotta / fresh cheese in that cheese cloth
- you put it in a fridge, with a bowl underneath, for few hours / overnight for liquid to strain (trickle away?)

You can speed the process by using paper towls, it will work for ricotta or fresh cheese, but not yogurt, as it is too liquid.



btw, my dear English speaker: what is the difference between strainer, sieve and colander and do you drain or strain food in strainer?
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Old 27.11.2020, 13:57
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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btw, my dear English speaker: what is the difference between strainer, sieve and colander and do you drain or strain food in strainer?
The size of the holes, getting bigger.

Verb-wise, to drain would mean to remove water from an otherwise solid ingredient, like past, rice, vegetables. To strain would be to separate solids out of a semi-liquid, so you'd strain tea leave out of tea, or in this case strain the fermented milk to separate the curds from the whey.
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Old 27.11.2020, 13:31
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Re: Cream cheese for Frosting?

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By draining the water I assume you mean squeezing the cream cheese through a cheese cloth or the like? There's no water in the container, it's just much softer as it is spreadable than the block we used in the US for the icing
I use one of those paper coffee filter papers and a filter coffee holder over a mug to drain and thicken yogurt, over-soft cream cheese. Takes a few hours but works okay.

Just don't attempt to squeeze as the paper filter will burst!
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