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Old 06.10.2011, 20:49
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Kosher Salt?

Has anyone been able to find Kosher salt in Zurich? I much prefer cooking with it and can only seem to find table salt or sea salt. Thanks in advance!
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Old 06.10.2011, 21:44
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Re: Kosher Salt?

me too! anyone?

also, you might want to post an intro
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Old 06.10.2011, 21:53
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Re: Kosher Salt?

There is a kosher world in zurich and kosher food in jelmoli-also where I got my matzo ball soup and gefilte fish! But, the sea salt is just as good.
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Old 06.10.2011, 21:55
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Re: Kosher Salt?

You could try this place.
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Old 06.10.2011, 22:02
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Re: Kosher Salt?

Before reading this I had never heard of such a salt so I checked
'The term "kosher salt" derives not from its being made in accordance with the guidelines for kosher foods as written in the Torah (nearly all salt is kosher, including ordinary table salt), but rather due to its use in making meats kosher. One salt manufacturer considers the term ambiguous, and distinguishes between "kosher certified salt" and "koshering salt". "Koshering salt" has the "small, flake-like form" useful in treating meat. "Kosher certified salt" is salt that has been certified as such by an appropriate religious body
Just posted this for others that may be as uninformed as I.
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Old 06.10.2011, 22:08
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Re: Kosher Salt?

Ahem ... okay ...... Kosher Salt, and Kosher Chocolate...............Anyone know where I can buy Kosher Corn Chips salted?
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Old 06.10.2011, 22:11
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Re: Kosher Salt?

Actually, the kosher salt that has recently become sort of a fad in American recipes is not the same as kosher certified salt according to the guidelines in the Torah. It's just salt with crystals that are coarser and more flake-like than the rather cubic crystals of ordinary table salt. It's somewhat easier to measure out by hand (the famous pinch of salt) than table salt. That's why American TV chefs fell in love with it.

Chemically it's just regular kitchen salt without addititives, although I saw brands in the USA that contain anticlumping agents. I'm not Jewish, but I assume that actually any normal kitchen salt could be considered kosher in the religious sense of the term. What many recipes require these days is the flaky kind, nothing to do with kosher stores and suchlike.

No idea where to get it in Switzerland, though, but since it is just salt there is no real need for it unless you want to coat the surface of same baked food with it just for the mere looks.

P.S. Ok, EarME beat me to it.
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Old 06.10.2011, 22:16
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Re: Kosher Salt?

Yeh, for me, it's more about the texture/size. Table salt is too fine for how I'm used to cooking, and the sea salt I've found has pretty big flakes. So - not a huge deal if I don't find it, but it'd be great if I did.

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Actually, the kosher salt that has recently become sort of a fad in American recipes is not the same as kosher certified salt according to the guidelines in the Torah. It's just salt with crystals that are coarser and more flake-like than the rather cubic crystals of ordinary table salt. It's somewhat easier to measure out by hand (the famous pinch of salt) than table salt. That's why American TV chefs fell in love with it.

Chemically it's just regular kitchen salt without addititives, although I saw brands in the USA that contain anticlumping agents. I'm not Jewish, but I assume that actually any normal kitchen salt could be considered kosher in the religious sense of the term. What many recipes require these days is the flaky kind, nothing to do with kosher stores and suchlike.

No idea where to get it in Switzerland, though, but since it is just salt there is no real need for it unless you want to coat the surface of same baked food with it just for the mere looks.

P.S. Ok, EarME beat me to it.
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Old 06.10.2011, 22:19
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Re: Kosher Salt?

This sounds like the French 'fleur du sel' - very light, flat crystals of salt, looks very delicate and pretty. In the UK Maldon Salt Flakes are the same type of thing - I've seen it in regular supermarkets here. I have heard it said that they are less salty than normal salt with a less harsh taste - I have no idea whether this is true!
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Old 06.10.2011, 23:05
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Re: Kosher Salt?

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P.S. Ok, EarME beat me to it.
Hay Mr Greybeard
Be careful for naming me as the rest of the Vets are not happy I made some comments on the EF. They are not happy
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Old 06.10.2011, 23:14
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Re: Kosher Salt?

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This sounds like the French 'fleur du sel' - very light, flat crystals of salt, looks very delicate and pretty. In the UK Maldon Salt Flakes are the same type of thing - I've seen it in regular supermarkets here. I have heard it said that they are less salty than normal salt with a less harsh taste - I have no idea whether this is true!
Fleur du sel I find is still a bit bigger. But a very good substitute. In fact, I like it much better. But it depends on what you are using it for.

Here in Argentina they have a salt that is called "sal parillera" (or sal for the grill), like kosher salt, the crystals are bigger than table salt.

Globus and many of the specialty stores have different kinds of salts.
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Old 06.10.2011, 23:17
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Re: Kosher Salt?

I believe it is different from French salt.

I have not been able to find Kosher salt in Zurich (not a helpful - I know), but I brought a few lbs of it from my last trip home, so I can share with people in Zurich.


Alex
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Old 07.10.2011, 03:35
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Re: Kosher Salt?

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Actually, the kosher salt that has recently become sort of a fad in American recipes is not the same as kosher certified salt according to the guidelines in the Torah.
IDK I would say Mortan Salt is the most common kosher salt here in America and its certified.



Heres a comparison of Mortan Kosher and Advance from CH.

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Old 07.10.2011, 08:51
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Re: Kosher Salt?

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IDK I would say Mortan Salt is the most common kosher salt here in America and its certified.
What I wrote didn't question that; what I meant was that the "kosher salt" according to American recipes need not be certified, although most brands are anyway.

As to Morton's Kosher Salt -- here's a warning: There is a huge difference in saltiness between various brands! For instance, when Morton's Kosher Salt is used in a recipes that were developed using Diamond Kosher Salt, it will be so salty you may want to spit it out. I think Morton's is about 50% saltier than Diamond. The reason for this phenomenon lies in the two totally different ways of making the salt crystals.
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Old 07.10.2011, 09:49
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Re: Kosher Salt?

This is a coarse variety of salt (similiar to "Kosher"-salt) that you can find in Coop/Migros and other stores.

http://www.coopathome.ch/b2c_coop/co...coop_dev)/.do?
nav=HOME&linkShop=DIREKT_EN&product=3021649

If you meant "Kosher salt", look at www.koshercity.ch. But, AFAIK salt is kosher by itself.
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Old 07.10.2011, 13:17
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Re: Kosher Salt?

Thank you everyone
I am indeed looking for the 'flakiness' quality of the salt, not the kosherness of it. I find that when I use recipes calling for kosher salt and I substitute table salt that everything ends up far too salty. So it doesn't seem like anyone has been able to find it, is that right? Seems like it might be time to investigate some worthy salt substitutions, and it sounds like French salt is a good place to start.
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Old 07.10.2011, 13:35
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Re: Kosher Salt?

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Thank you everyone
I am indeed looking for the 'flakiness' quality of the salt, not the kosherness of it. I find that when I use recipes calling for kosher salt and I substitute table salt that everything ends up far too salty. So it doesn't seem like anyone has been able to find it, is that right? Seems like it might be time to investigate some worthy salt substitutions, and it sounds like French salt is a good place to start.
Yes, try "fleur de sel". In the end all the salt is same. It's just the texture that feels different. The normal "Kochsalz" or "Jurasalz" it's just more compressed therefor you just have to use less. If you use it for cooking all salt with no additional ingredients does the job.
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Old 17.11.2012, 20:43
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Re: Kosher Salt?

In Italy the meat purchased from a shochet having a reliable teuda' has been already treated with salt in the shop, and is considered kosher (or even glatt kosher, if additional requirements are met) for immediate use.

As I have seen from this thread that people here look for salt suitable to kosherize meat, should I think that the kosher meat sold in Zurich has to undergo a melicha' carried out by the customer? It would be a great increase in complexity.

I thank the participants to this thread for having taught me a piece of halacha' I was not aware of. Apart from this specific use, however, I think that regular salt is kosher "by definition" and can be used freely. I do not arrive to understand if standard salt sold in supermarkets is also kosher for pessach (I do not think so, at least for the machmir)

Shalom- Yuval
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Old 17.11.2012, 22:19
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Re: Kosher Salt?

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In Italy the meat purchased from a shochet having a reliable teuda' has been already treated with salt in the shop, and is considered kosher (or even glatt kosher, if additional requirements are met) for immediate use.

As I have seen from this thread that people here look for salt suitable to kosherize meat, should I think that the kosher meat sold in Zurich has to undergo a melicha' carried out by the customer? It would b.e a great increase in complexity.

I thank the participants to this thread for having taught me a piece of halacha' I was not aware of. Apart from this specific use, however, I think that regular salt is kosher "by definition" and can be used freely. I do not arrive to understand if standard salt, sold in supermarkets is also kosher for pessach (I do not think so, at least for the machmir)

Shalom- Yuval
the thread wasn't to find salt for cleaning meat. kosher salt is regular cooking salt and there is nothing particularly kosher about it besides its texture. don't learn halachah on englishforum
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Old 17.11.2012, 23:19
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I was looking at maldon salt, from Essex, i believe, but it consists of very big flakes and might be too delicate compared to the smaller, but thicker kosher salt.
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