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  #21  
Old 18.10.2011, 23:25
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

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I have started cooking more Indian food lately, and I'm getting exceedingly tired of executing "mince garlic and grate ginger and then pound them both together in a mortar for three minutes" when all the recipe said was "puree with a little water".

There's got to be a handy gadget for this. Doesn't there? Something like a coffee/spice grinder but suitable for wet ingredients, or perhaps a small but very able blender?

Help!

(Also, is it cheating if I puree massive quantities of ginger and garlic at once, freeze them in ice cube trays and thaw as needed? Seriously thinking of it.)
I use a hand blender with one of these attachments. Never had a problem with fibers or anything. Zing zing. Quick as can be. It's my most used appliance!


And use a coffee grinder for dried ingredients like whole dried peppers, etc. But you really need a seperate one. Don't use the same one to grind your coffee.

Someone recently asked where to get an Indian spice grinder. If you're really commited you could go get on of those mentioned on that thread.

Last edited by miniMia; 19.10.2011 at 16:19. Reason: error on picture, won't appear.
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  #22  
Old 19.10.2011, 00:56
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

I just use these.





For the curry one just add meat, butter(or ghee), and water. Simple.

http://www.kitchensofindia.com/globa...ce_germany.asp
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  #23  
Old 19.10.2011, 08:13
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

This one is the all in all in Indian kitchen.

This blender comes with three different size jars.. Small ones are perfect to grind small quantity of spices like ginger,garlic,chilli pastes,chutney and dry masala as well.

Medium sized ones are useful to wet grinding, and bigger ones can be used to make juice and milk shakes...

This product is available in Indian store as well as Srilankan store..
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  #24  
Old 19.10.2011, 08:54
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

Please do report back if you find something that works. I recently got a recommended ceramic mill so that I could grind spices myself but it really doesn't work very well. It is too bad because I really liked the idea of having a mechanical gadget instead of one that needs electricity or batteries. I guess a mortar falls into that category as well but it is the one thing in my kitchen that I never use - way too much work.

As for garlic and ginger, I use a garlic press from migro for both. I peel the ginger and cut it into slices and press: you get the ginger and the juice. That doesn't solve the problem of using a mortar.
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Old 19.10.2011, 09:02
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

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this one:


Brilliant for chopping everything (nuts, herbs, eggs, onion, garlic etc etc) really quickly and with no mess.

We've got one of those and it's brilliant. I also put the pureed garlic or ginger (seperately)into ice cube trays and freeze for future use. It's super easy and you can just take out as much as you want for each dish.
I also used to do it for onion when my boy was small as he supposedly didn't onion. The pureed stuff could easily be used in casseroles etc to add the flavour with being visible.
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Old 19.10.2011, 09:09
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

I like this Multi-Chef from Tupperware:



works great with onions, carrots, nuts, garlic etc. I think I have used it for ginger a few times as well. I prefer this to the chopper that you bash on as I think it is easier to clean. The blades are wicked sharp, though - have gotten cut (not badly) once or twice. The paddle tool is great for making small amounts of scrambled eggs and other smooth batters.

Last edited by drmom; 19.10.2011 at 09:11. Reason: add forgotten content
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  #27  
Old 19.10.2011, 09:16
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

Can you say what brand this is and maybe where you can buy it? It certainly looks interesting.

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this one:


Brilliant for chopping everything (nuts, herbs, eggs, onion, garlic etc etc) really quickly and with no mess.
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  #28  
Old 19.10.2011, 09:20
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

Firstly, I suggest that you do not buy the pre-prepared ginger/garlic pastes. They lack a lot of the lovely pungency that the fresh products provide. It would be like buying chopped onions in a jar, nothing like the fresh thing. Yes I know they are convenient, but not worth it IMO. A little bit of extra effort will produce a better tasting dish.

Making your own paste is quite simple really. A lot of Indian home cooks will purée large quantities of garlic and ginger (separately) in a mini processor/chopper/blender (without water) and then freeze it (separately) in a covered container. If you freeze it in an ice tray, your ice cream will reek of garlic/ginger. Some add a touch of vinegar to the purée and/or oil, some don't. My mother has been doing this for years and has never gone wrong. And she only has to do it one a month.

When you are cooking and need to use some ginger or garlic, put the frozen container in the microwave, defrost for a couple of minutes, use how much you want and return to the freezer.

All ginger is stringy (fibrous). But the trick is to buy it young. Young fresh ginger (preferably from an Asian grocer like Aggarwals) is far less fibrous than the older ginger you get in Migros or Coop. Young ginger is heavier, firmer and even looks better (less wriggly).

And finally, do not combine garlic paste with ginger paste. There are several recipes in Indian cuisine (traditional Punjabi Aloo Gobi only requires ginger not garlic) that require only one of them. If you purée them together, you will be creating more work later.

I personally purée garlic and grate ginger fresh when needed but that's because I only cook a curry once a week. If I were to cook Indian/Asian more often, I'd purée and freeze them as my mum does.

Aloo Gobi with fresh hot hot chapatis ... hungry already!
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  #29  
Old 19.10.2011, 09:32
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

Ziger, it's by "Good Grips".

http://www.amazon.co.uk/OXO-1057959-...9009479&sr=1-1

I paid £17 for mine from Selfridges (London) yesterday. Much better designed than the one I had before, although that did only cost around £6 a few years ago.
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  #30  
Old 19.10.2011, 09:33
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

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Can you say what brand this is and maybe where you can buy it? It certainly looks interesting.
Widely available, I got mine from a little shop on Saint Louis main street, don't remember the name, but sells all kinds of kitchen gadgets, have seen it in other shops as well. Aternatively, also available online as Adrian already linked
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  #31  
Old 19.10.2011, 09:37
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

What I always do if I need large quantities is to start with the blender and then finish it off with the P&M. In that way you have the benefit of the speed of the blender but you still keep the right texture (and a lot of washing up to do..)

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Ack! I totally know how you feel MN.

I make pastes myself for SE Asian cooking and moaned to my mum about how much work it is once. She gave me a sharp talking to ("no easy way out if you want authentic cooking!!!") but admitted that a blender is the best alternative to a mortar - even though the older generation like my late nan, would have shaken her head in disapproval - because a mortor does the best job of blending the spices in nicely and you can control the texture of your puree.

And no, its not cheating if you puree a suitable amount for future use (depending on how often you use them to cook though). I do that - just dont tell my mum.

Just dont get those in a bottle if you want the most authentic result. They are all processed.
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  #32  
Old 19.10.2011, 09:57
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

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I have started cooking more Indian food lately, and I'm getting exceedingly tired of executing "mince garlic and grate ginger and then pound them both together in a mortar for three minutes" when all the recipe said was "puree with a little water".

There's got to be a handy gadget for this. Doesn't there? Something like a coffee/spice grinder but suitable for wet ingredients, or perhaps a small but very able blender?

Help!

(Also, is it cheating if I puree massive quantities of ginger and garlic at once, freeze them in ice cube trays and thaw as needed? Seriously thinking of it.)
I cook a lot of Indian food and bought a Staubmixer with accessories (this one http://www.philips.co.uk/c/juicers-a...hr1372_90/prd/) and it makes short work of garlic, onions, tomatoes, basically everthing you need for a good curry with minimum fuss.

As for doing loads of garlic at once and then keeping it refrigerated... well, thats what Indian women do on a regular basis (they cook Indian food 3x a day in India, you dont think they do it from fresh each time do you? )

At Bharkats cashand carry in Wiedikon you can also buy jas of minced garlic and ginger which my ex (Indian) used to buy all the time when she made us curry.

Also, check out my Shan spice pack thread, it may save you buying all the different spices. Shan spice packs (For Indian/Pakistan Curries)
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  #33  
Old 19.10.2011, 16:22
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

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I cook a lot of Indian food and bought a Staubmixer with accessories (this one http://www.philips.co.uk/c/juicers-a...hr1372_90/prd/) and it makes short work of garlic, onions, tomatoes, basically everthing you need for a good curry with minimum fuss[/URL]
That's the set I bought only in white one. I used the small chopper, the hand blender and the whisk all the time. Really, this set up is so useful and takes up little room.
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  #34  
Old 20.10.2011, 19:03
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

Being Indian and someone who cooks indian food at least twice a week, my method is to buy a large batch of garlic, ginger and green chilli's maybe once every 3 months.
I blitz them all (separately) into a purée with a little bit of water. I have a magic genie or bullet as it is also known, but a small food processor will work just as well. I then put the purées in a zip-lock bag and lie them flat in the freezer. Once they have frozen I chop them into blocks and place them in a airtight box to avoid smelling out the freezer. Then when I am cooking a meal I will take out 1 or 2 squares about 30mins before cooking and leave them to defrost or you can defrost them in the microwave.
I've been using this method for years and it's a bit annoying to peel all the garlic, but I try and rope my husband into helping out
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Old 20.10.2011, 19:22
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

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Being Indian and someone who cooks indian food at least twice a week, my method is to buy a large batch of garlic, ginger and green chilli's maybe once every 3 months.
I blitz them all (separately) into a purée with a little bit of water. I have a magic genie or bullet as it is also known, but a small food processor will work just as well. I then put the purées in a zip-lock bag and lie them flat in the freezer. Once they have frozen I chop them into blocks and place them in a airtight box to avoid smelling out the freezer. Then when I am cooking a meal I will take out 1 or 2 squares about 30mins before cooking and leave them to defrost or you can defrost them in the microwave.
I've been using this method for years and it's a bit annoying to peel all the garlic, but I try and rope my husband into helping out
Great tips. So now the question is: when are you going to cook an Indian meal for all of us?
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Old 20.10.2011, 19:33
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

Bought an Aldi blender/miller a couple of years ago dirt-cheap and it has served me very well in blending ginger, chillies, garlic, shallots, lemongrass etc, for curries. It has two kinds of blades and two sizes of jugs (small one is for dried stuff; it can even produce green tea powder out of green tea leaves!)


They don't usually carry this product. But other stores will have a similar product of a different brand.

To shorten the ginger fibres, peel and slice cross-section thinly before popping them into the blender.

Yeah, don't buy those ready pureed stuff in a jar - less flavour and too many E-numbers.


P.S. In a pinch, you can use a Stabmixer in a tall, narrow container. It's just a bit more fiddly and you need to stir your spices a bit in between blitzes and perhaps add a bit of water.
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  #37  
Old 20.10.2011, 23:29
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

Bad cook here... I don't "paste" them, I just rough chop the garlic and fine dice the ginger. I know it's not proper but I am usually just making for hubby and I and I LIKE big pieces of garlic.
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Old 20.10.2011, 23:55
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

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I have started cooking more Indian food lately, and I'm getting exceedingly tired of executing "mince garlic and grate ginger and then pound them both together in a mortar for three minutes" when all the recipe said was "puree with a little water".

There's got to be a handy gadget for this. Doesn't there? Something like a coffee/spice grinder but suitable for wet ingredients, or perhaps a small but very able blender?

Help!

(Also, is it cheating if I puree massive quantities of ginger and garlic at once, freeze them in ice cube trays and thaw as needed? Seriously thinking of it.)
in your case, i believe you already possess a device which may be coaxed into automating these tasks. it is known as a husband or sometimes 'dogsbody'. with the right equipment (riding crop) and training, will be able to perform these tasks admirably.
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Old 21.10.2011, 00:39
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

I use my garlic press for both garlic and ginger and for other larger veg (peppers etc.) I use a blender.
Never had the patience to do huge quantities and freeze but sounds practical!
I hate gadgets. Hate washing fiddly things and hate wasting space in the dishwasher-fusspot, I suppose.
But I like chopping everything fresh and by hand-well with my favourite knife, a cheap but efficient Migros veg knife- I find it relaxing-unless I'm cooking for ten that is...
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Old 21.10.2011, 11:39
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Re: Got to be an easier way: recommended gadgets for Indian cooking

As Minimia pointed out, I use the little blender jar that comes as a part of the stabmixer set, throw in a few garlic pods and a inch of peeled ginger and blitz, you can even do small quantities fresh but you will have to add more water.
Peeling large quantities, freezing them and defrosting them never worked for me, maybe I am not disciplined enough.
When I cook indian, I peel 4-5 pods of garlic and peel a bit of ginger along with chopping other stuff like onions, tomatoes etc. Take you 5 mins extra and rinsing that jar take you 1 min or I pop it into the dishwaser.
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