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Old 07.02.2012, 12:50
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What is Swede in German?

What is swede in german? What to say in the shops?

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/content/k...lossary/swede/
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Old 07.02.2012, 13:11
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Re: Swede in German?

Kohlrübe (though I've never seen it here)

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Old 07.02.2012, 13:30
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Re: Swede in German?

Sorry, don't know but found some solid dating advice in your link...
"Look for swedes with smooth, unblemished skins; smaller swedes have a sweeter flavour and a more tender texture."
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Old 07.02.2012, 14:10
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Re: Swede in German?

Kohlruebe or Steckruebe. "Weisse Ruebe" or "navets" (fr.) are turnips, these are available from time to time. Swedes, unfortunately, are considered animal feed by the Swiss, just good enough to make lanterns of in November ("Raebeliechtli") - as a result, they can only be found in November in the craft section (!) of Coop City, Migros DoIt, etc.
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Old 07.02.2012, 15:12
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Re: Swede in German?

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Kohlruebe or Steckruebe. "Weisse Ruebe" or "navets" (fr.) are turnips, these are available from time to time. Swedes, unfortunately, are considered animal feed by the Swiss, just good enough to make lanterns of in November ("Raebeliechtli") - as a result, they can only be found in November in the craft section (!) of Coop City, Migros DoIt, etc.
We bought some in coop in Neuchatel last weekend so the season is either longer here or maybe because we don't have the lantern thing they don't sell them all in November.

Can't remember what they were called though and it would be in French anyway.
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Old 07.02.2012, 15:16
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Re: Swede in German?

Next you'll be asking if Swedes speak Swissish, lol? (a question asked by our milkman in the UK)
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Old 07.02.2012, 15:25
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Re: Swede in German?

...and I thought the correct answer would be Schwedischer.
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