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Old 25.10.2012, 20:36
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German bakery

Does anyone know of German bakery in Lausanne?

Perhaps it is because I am planning my Christmas in Berlin, but I have developed an intense craving for proper German rye bread, preferably dense with seeds. And the factory produced, wrapped in plastic variety available at Migros etc is not an acceptable substitute.
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Old 25.10.2012, 20:40
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Re: German bakery

And Saskatchewan is your location
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Old 25.10.2012, 20:46
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Re: German bakery

no - clearly it is not, I forgot to change it when I moved . My apologies for the confusion
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Old 25.10.2012, 20:49
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Re: German bakery

I imagine the closest will be in Germany!

Tom
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Old 25.10.2012, 21:50
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Re: German bakery

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Does anyone know of German bakery in Lausanne?

Perhaps it is because I am planning my Christmas in Berlin, but I have developed an intense craving for proper German rye bread, preferably dense with seeds. And the factory produced, wrapped in plastic variety available at Migros etc is not an acceptable substitute.
Rye bread = Roggenbrot is available all over German speaking Switzerland, Austria and Germany. There however of course are regional differences

A company like THIS one
http://www.reformbaeckerei.ch/sortiment/brot/roggenbrot
is not alone
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Old 25.10.2012, 22:01
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Re: German bakery

I have no idea.
The best would be to talk to the shop-personel in the various organic-stores in your region.

If you like rye-bread and are really into it, you should really stop by one of their shops on your way to Berlin:
http://www.hofpfisterei.de

They have by far the best rye-bread I've ever eaten. Nothing I've bought here (and I only buy in organic shops/bakeries) comes close - by a wide margin.

20kg per person per day is the maximum to bring into Switzerland - better clear out your fridge before you go ;-)
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Old 25.10.2012, 22:10
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Re: German bakery

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I imagine the closest will be in Germany!

Tom
the problem is that if the O.P. has a speciality from Berlin or Hannover or München in mind, there is no hope in southwestern Baden-Württemberg
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Old 26.10.2012, 02:08
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Re: German bakery

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Rye bread = Roggenbrot is available all over German speaking Switzerland, Austria and Germany. There however of course are regional differences

A company like THIS one
http://www.reformbaeckerei.ch/sortiment/brot/roggenbrot
is not alone
She's not talking about roggenbrot (which I might add is not fresh in the usual groceries and often of 'battle bread' staleness), but a pumpernickel rye, that just doesn't exist in Switzerland in a fresh form. If it had, I'd have gained a few pounds from eating rather than drinking. Switzerland is the America of bread culture in a sea of amazing EU bread cultures; France, Germany and Italy so it's a bit puzzling how limited the fresh bread variety is at least on the German side of Switzerland. Oh, I know, the English and the Yankees will cry foul on such criticism, but until you've lived among fresh bread bakeries, particularly rye bread that calls your name when you walk past the bakery and have eaten it warm from the oven, you have clearly been deprived and thus do not understand the lack in your Swiss bread selection.

The short of it, though, is if you want a proper fresh loaf of rye, you'll need to make a trek of it to the shops over the border from Basel. That or learn to bake your own which is doable, but you'll have to shop over the border for the flour since, again, the selection of flours in Switzerland is rather limited.
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Old 26.10.2012, 02:19
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Re: German bakery

You had to mention pumpernickel rye, didn't you? Now my Reuben suddenly seems lacking...

Spare a thought for us poor Zentralschweizers, who can only dream of the riches across the border.
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Old 26.10.2012, 03:20
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Re: German bakery

Don't cry meloncollie..christmas is coming and you'll have an excuse to trek into Germany for an even greater abundance of breads. I still make all the christmas breads and cookies my mom did when I was a kid....it's worth the trip to get them fresh if you can't make them yourself. Scandinavia has even more awesome rye breads....omnomnom. There must be a bread barrier at the Swiss border or something....
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Old 26.10.2012, 03:49
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Re: German bakery

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Scandinavia has even more awesome rye breads....omnomnom.
Aaaargh! Now you have me dreaming of farmor's Limpa bread.

It's been decades, but I can still smell it baking...
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Old 26.10.2012, 10:31
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Re: German bakery

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Switzerland is the America of bread culture in a sea of amazing EU bread cultures; France, Germany and Italy
Italy pales in comparison to Switzerland for bread, and, except for baguettes and croissants, I can't say that France has much to offer compared to Switzerland, either.

I agree about the US, though!

Tom
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Old 26.10.2012, 15:38
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Re: German bakery

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Italy pales in comparison to Switzerland for bread, and, except for baguettes and croissants, I can't say that France has much to offer compared to Switzerland, either.
Hrm...you must not have that gene which compels you to detour into any bakery with warm bread. I ate my way through Italy on bread alone (surprisingly, I'm not a big fan of pasta...it's a texture thing) and Italy has an amazing range of breads and bread bakeries that I think I'm pretty safe in saying that Switzerland simply doesn't have the same kind of bread culture or variety. It is a curious thing that I couldn't quite figure out but mostly attributed to the limited variety of wheat.
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Old 26.10.2012, 19:49
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Re: German bakery

It seems I may have to wait until Christmas - is it strange that I am seriously considering paying for a piece of luggage on my easy jet flight just so I can be assured that I have plenty of room to bring back bread ???
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Old 26.10.2012, 21:01
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Re: German bakery

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the problem is that if the O.P. has a speciality from Berlin or Hannover or München in mind, there is no hope in southwestern Baden-Württemberg
you are wrong (once more).
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Old 26.10.2012, 23:22
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Re: German bakery

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She's not talking about roggenbrot (which I might add is not fresh in the usual groceries and often of 'battle bread' staleness), but a pumpernickel rye, that just doesn't exist in Switzerland in a fresh form. If it had, I'd have gained a few pounds from eating rather than drinking. Switzerland is the America of bread culture in a sea of amazing EU bread cultures; France, Germany and Italy so it's a bit puzzling how limited the fresh bread variety is at least on the German side of Switzerland. Oh, I know, the English and the Yankees will cry foul on such criticism, but until you've lived among fresh bread bakeries, particularly rye bread that calls your name when you walk past the bakery and have eaten it warm from the oven, you have clearly been deprived and thus do not understand the lack in your Swiss bread selection.

The short of it, though, is if you want a proper fresh loaf of rye, you'll need to make a trek of it to the shops over the border from Basel. That or learn to bake your own which is doable, but you'll have to shop over the border for the flour since, again, the selection of flours in Switzerland is rather limited.
Bread culture in France and Italy ??? You must be joking. The fresh bread variety in Switzerland is clearly far wider than the limited choice in Italy and France. I for decades wondered about the limited variety in both countries. And when talking about "France" I do NOT talk about the Alsace, which is a special case.

Pumpernickel http://www.essen-und-trinken.de/pumpernickel# is of course from Westfalen (NRW today, a Western part of the Kingdom of Prussia up to 1918) . I when travelling in Germany had both Roggenbrot and and Pumpernickel. Also had Roggenbrot overhere. My brother loved Roggenbrot, I however did NOT.

You overhere should try

- Gugelhopf (speciality from Schaffhausen)


- Hefenring (another speciality from Schaffhausen)


- Birewegge ( a speciality from Luzern/Bern)


plus here, from Sieber in AU/SG a view on some of their breads
-


beside this, practically every area has its own sort in a dark and a light variety, and good bakeries throughout the country have the whole range

Also in Switzerland is the home of



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Old 27.10.2012, 00:09
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Re: German bakery

The bread-assortment of Steiner Zürich here
http://www.steiner-beck.ch/sortiment...ht_produkte=21

and of Winter Adliswil
http://www.beckwinter.ch/brote.php

the Ermatinger in Schaffhausen already was the favourite of Grandmum

http://www.zuckerbeck.ch/html/angbrote.html

or turn to Känzig in Kilchberg


and it looks far better
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Old 27.10.2012, 00:19
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Re: German bakery

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you are wrong (once more).
But, as shown above, the Pumpernickel is from the German "Far North". I indeed apologize for the MIS-translation of Rye-Bread, but my mis-translation was based on a dictionary of Collins, which usually is accurate. They translate Rye as Roggen and Ryebread as Roggenbrot and Pumpernickel as 'pumpernickel'. Source: ISBN 3-12-517150-4

I to the O.P. would strongly recommend NOT to buy the product in mind in Southern Germany but somewhere north of the Taunus line, IF the desired bread really IS Pumpernickel- bread
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Old 27.10.2012, 00:44
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Re: German bakery

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But, as shown above, the Pumpernickel is from the German "Far North".
Except for the version known in the US:

"A separate pumpernickel tradition has developed in North America, where the loaf color approximates the dark color of traditional German pumpernickel by adding molasses, coffee, cocoa powder, or other darkening agents."

Tom
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Old 27.10.2012, 02:34
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Re: German bakery

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The bread-assortment of Steiner Zürich here
http://www.steiner-beck.ch/sortiment...ht_produkte=21

and of Winter Adliswil
http://www.beckwinter.ch/brote.php

the Ermatinger in Schaffhausen already was the favourite of Grandmum

http://www.zuckerbeck.ch/html/angbrote.html

or turn to Känzig in Kilchberg


and it looks far better
Perhaps it's a matter of taste and exposure as I found most of the 'zopf' varieties to be inedible due to being dry and lacking any flavor. I didn't make an exhaustive search of local bakeries but, many of the rustic varietals were tough and had nuts/seeds often to make up for a lack of flavor as well. The exception was many of the silser/pretzel sorts of bread, e.g. pretzel king, which had a good combination of crust, taste and texture. All bets were off, of course, for any of the breads from the local COOP/Migros since they were usually either commercial or stale.

I'm picky about my bread, which is why I often bake my own though I can usually find something I can manage to eat bread-wise that I've not baked myself....but other than the silser rolls, I really didn't find anything palatable in Switzerland. Germany, though, I didn't have such a challenge. And I still dream of the baguettes in France on holiday.
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