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View Poll Results: Are you interested in a Recipe Exchange?
Definitely, I have some good recipes too 21 55.26%
Yes, I'd like to add some to my collection 11 28.95%
No, I never cook 4 10.53%
Doesn't matter either way to me 2 5.26%
Voters: 38. You may not vote on this poll

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  #21  
Old 17.10.2006, 18:30
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Quote:
hey Nicky

Your recipe sounds great. Two things i do with homemade burgers are
1. use raw onions straight into the buger mix....i guess this is just down to preference really but i love em this way
2.Scoop a little bit from the middle of the burger shape and stuff some cheese in and cover up with what you removed.

Looking forward to trying your recipe though
Hi Brian

I used to use raw onion but then found using cooked was better as you got a sweeter flavour from the cooked onions and it helps bind all the ingredients together, and yeah I sometimes put a chunk of cheese usually mozzerella in the middle - great idea

go easy on the cinnamon in this recipe tho as it can spoil it but i recommend the tom relish and you can make it as spicy as you please
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  #22  
Old 17.10.2006, 18:33
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Quote:
Scoop a little bit from the middle of the burger shape and stuff some cheese in and cover up with what you removed.
This works great with Stilton, really yummy
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  #23  
Old 17.10.2006, 20:15
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Quote:
Sorry Colors i meant to quote you on that. I love the recipe idea.
Just wondering about your lasagne ingredients though and the amount of tomato puree in there???


Quote:
Add about 1400 grams of Tomato puree and
3-5 bay leaves
Hello Brianb_ie,
The recipe was given to me that way, but I believe I use less than that myself. Like 800-1200.
The bay leaves are only for the time the sauce cooks. They don't go into the lasagna itself but they add flavor.

Last edited by colors; 17.10.2006 at 23:16.
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  #24  
Old 17.10.2006, 23:50
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Looks like there is a lot of interest in Spätzle. My Swiss husband doesn't like it so I've never made it, but his parents like it. I talked with them today and they said that Spätzle comes originally from the Black Forest area of Germany, and the Swiss call it Knöpfli.

To make Spätzle from scratch, according to the cook book, takes hours because of the 2-3 hours it needs to sit in a warm room. It also needs a special tool, called a Spätzlepress or a Knöpflisieb, to create it properly. The advice I received is to go to Germany and buy it in the Black Forest area. They said it's a lot cheaper, and good.


To make Spätzli
From Katinka Monstar "das grosse reader's digest kochbuch"

400 grams of flour
1/4 Liter of water
3-4 eggs
1 flat teaspoon of salt

Sift the flour first and add the salt, eggs and water. It is better if the dough is too tough than for it to be too soft. The dough needs to be mixed quite a bit, and when it's done, you'll know because it should be heavy and fall from the cooking spoon.

Cover the dough in a warm room for 2-3 hours. Then put it through the Spätzlepress a little at a time, right into the boiling salt water. Boil the Spätzli with out a lid. The Spätzli are done when they swim on top of the water.

Use a slotted spoon to remove them from the boiling water and serve them either on a hot plate or keep them warm in another heated dish with a lid.

Serve the Spätzli as a side item with a thick sauce that goes with one of the following items: Rinderschmorbraten (roast from a cow), Saurbraten ??, Rehbraten (roast from a deer), or Wildpfeffer.
(I'm sure this book has a recipe for the above listed items, but I'll have to find them first, and only if they are requested)

The left over Spätzle can be fried in butter. Add a shredded hard cheese and lots of green salat. This can be eaten as a small meal between meals, or works well as a small evening meal.
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  #25  
Old 18.10.2006, 00:28
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Älplermagronen
No meat

Principia Discordia, please do still share your recipe for Älplermagronen, especially if it's different that this one. This one just sparked my interest because of the history behind it and getting to learn it from my new Grandmother here in Switzerland, I call Grössi.

Switzerland hasn't always been rich, so when they needed to make food stretch, this was one meal they made. They had the potatoes, cheese, butter, onions, and for the side dish, the apples. At least the farmers did, so this dish didn't cost them much.

Grössi lives in a nursing home, and doesn't get to cook often, so when she visited us she requested the liberty to do so, which was a joy for me - because I got to learn something from her. I can't give you measurements for the following things, but you should be able to figure them out okay.

Need:
potatoes
Pasta
one onion
separated butter
salt
ementaler cheese (shred it)

Pressure cook potatoes in salt water. The salt should be spread over the potatoes. Boil some pasta in salt water till it's done. Shred Ementaler and have it ready. In a separate pan, place separated butter and a sliced onion. Fry the onion well, till it's clear and slightly crispy.

In an oven pan, layer your pasta, potatoes (peeled and sliced), onions, and cheese, a little at a time. The last layer should be cheese, then on top, pour the melted butter and fried onions. Place this pan in a preheated oven (180°C?) till the cheese is nicely melted and slightly brown on top.

While your Älplermagronen is finishing up in the oven, prepare your side dish:

Need:
Applesauce
cinnamon
cream
flour
separated butter
bread crumbs for breading

In a sauce pan, on medium to high heat, place the contents of a jar of applesauce, sprinkle with cinnamon, add a tablespoon of flour to thicken. Stir this constantly. Once the sauce boils a bit, turn down the heat and keep stiring, but add about 2 tablespoons of cream. Now, in another oven pan, about 4 inches thick, place your applesauce and spread it nice and smooth. Pour your bread crumbs on top of the sauce and make it about a quarter of a centemeter thick. Set this asside, but not too far away.

In another sauce pan, turn the heat up really high and place some separated butter. When the butter is boiling hot, pour it over the top of the bread crumbs slowly and in a thin stream till the crumbs are saturated. It will bubble up a little as you do this because of the heat.

You are now ready to serve your historical Älplermagronen with a traditional side dish.

Last edited by colors; 05.07.2008 at 13:50.
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  #26  
Old 18.10.2006, 08:36
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

I'm chilling, and the buggers are still annoying me
dave

Quote:
Shape into small flat buggers and chill until ready to cook (ideally chilled for at least an hour)
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  #27  
Old 18.10.2006, 09:52
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Quote:
I'm chilling, and the buggers are still annoying me
dave
oops forgot to spell check
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  #28  
Old 20.10.2006, 20:29
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Right I have cheated and bought some ready made spätzli but what do I do with it? I have eaten it once in a restaurant and i just remember it being really stodgy with ham onions and cheese (very fatening but nice) I am guessing that I boil the spatzli then fry off some onions mix them in with the cooked spätzli along with some chopped up ham put it all in a baking dish smother it in cheese and bake, is that about right? or am I completely off track?

Any help/advice appreciated

ta very much
Nicky
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  #29  
Old 20.10.2006, 20:43
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Quote:
Right I have cheated and bought some ready made spätzli but what do I do with it? I have eaten it once in a restaurant and i just remember it being really stodgy with ham onions and cheese (very fatening but nice) I am guessing that I boil the spatzli then fry off some onions mix them in with the cooked spätzli along with some chopped up ham put it all in a baking dish smother it in cheese and bake, is that about right? or am I completely off track?

Any help/advice appreciated

ta very much
Nicky
I've never had the premade kind, without seeing the directions, I couldn't say. Are they the dried kind, like pasta? Because those are terrible. The "wet" kind are slightly better, I think you just fry those though, and skip the boiling.
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  #30  
Old 20.10.2006, 20:54
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Quote:
I've never had the premade kind, without seeing the directions, I couldn't say. Are they the dried kind, like pasta? Because those are terrible. The "wet" kind are slightly better, I think you just fry those though, and skip the boiling.
they're the wet kind, i've just poiled them only for a few mins tho, so how do you normally serve them? i've just sauted some mushrooms and onion and mixed it in with the spätzli along with some choped ham, topped it with cheese and am baking it now, its probably completely wrong but hey ho hopefully it will taste OK
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  #31  
Old 20.10.2006, 21:10
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Quote:
they're the wet kind, i've just poiled them only for a few mins tho, so how do you normally serve them? i've just sauted some mushrooms and onion and mixed it in with the spätzli along with some choped ham, topped it with cheese and am baking it now, its probably completely wrong but hey ho hopefully it will taste OK
They should be fine, I either fry them with onions, or bake them with Gruyere, but there's probably dozens of different ways of serving them.
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  #32  
Old 20.10.2006, 22:29
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

There are a lot of things you can do with spaetzli and I usually treat them like spagetthi/rice and most often have them as a starch to some dish (for example meat), as this is how most of my family treats them, and have seen them used that way a lot in restaurants as well.

The premade ones that I have bought before were pretty much fcooked already and thus they mostly need to just be heated up. I prefer to have my spaetzli crunch so I tend to fry them in a pan, but you can also just boil them for a few minutes. The package most likely has some guide lines about how long you want to either fry or boil them.
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  #33  
Old 22.10.2006, 12:22
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

I saw in the other thread that there is a craving for yum cha, dimsum, pao (or pork buns in English), here is a recipe:

Ingredients:
2 ½ cups all purpose flour
31/2 tsp baking powder
3 tbsps caster sugar
2 tbsps softened lard
½ cup water
½ tsp white vinegar

½ kilo ground pork sautéed
1tbsp oil
2 scallions, minced
1/3 cup water
3 tsp soy sauce
2 tsp oyster sauce
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp cornstarch

Directions:

To make dough:
  1. Sift flour and baking powder into a bowl add sugar and mix, rub in the lard with your fingertips until evenly distributed.
  2. Add water and vinegar together and knead until a fairly soft dough.
  3. Shape into a ball and let it rest, covered, for 30 minutes.

To make filling
  1. Saute the onions and pork briefly in the oil.
  2. Add water and seasonings and simmer until the sauce thickens.
  3. Spread this filling onto a plate to cool.
To make the buns-----------.
  1. Divide the dough into10 portions.
  2. Mould each into a smooth ball.
  3. Roll each out on a lightly floured surface to a circle about 4 inches across.
  4. Put a heaping teasp of filling in the centre and gather the edges inward, folding and pleating to make a neat join.
  5. Twist dough to seal.
  6. Put each bun, join downwards, on a piece of bakers paper in a steamer.
  7. Cover and steam for 20 min utes.
  8. Serve warm.
I was also missing it so much so I decided to make it myself. I found several recipes in the internet somewhere then tried them all. Each recipe has it's faults, so I combined all the good points of each and came up with this one.
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  #34  
Old 09.11.2006, 18:44
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

I'm crap at following recipes, but I have a general recipe (meaning that I use words like handful) for Fleischvügel. This is Swiss. Also, Zürischnätzlis
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  #35  
Old 09.11.2006, 18:45
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Plus: For the British: Switzerland has something called Pastetlis that vaguely resemble a messier Pastie!
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  #36  
Old 27.11.2006, 21:55
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Hello Cathy20,

Thank you so much for the dimsum recipe. I've been one time to a dimsum restaurant in London and loved it.
I'll just have to try it out!
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  #37  
Old 27.11.2006, 22:21
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Here is a recipe for Beef in Stout I first posted on http://www.bastronomy.com:

This is a nice one to make on a wet winter Saturday as you can watch the footy on telly whilst the simmering takes place - and you can do the mushrooms at half time thereby missing Jimmy Hill's (ahem) profound observations on the progress of the game!



Ingredients for 2-3 portions
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
750g stewing beef, cut into 1 inch chunks
1 large onion peeled and chopped
200g mushrooms washed and halved
1 handful fresh tarragon
2 large cans of your favourite stout
soy sauce


Equipment: You will need a heavy flameproof pot with a lid - e.g. from Le Cresuet.

Place the pot on the stove and add a few good lugs of olive oil. When the oil is hot, fry the beef a few pieces at a time until browned on the outside. Remove the beef to a plate. Add more oil to the pot if necessary.
Add the onions to the pot and fry them gently for a few minutes in the juices left behind by the beef. Then add the flour.

Next, return the beef to the pot and incorporate with the onions and flour. Then add the whole can of stout. Add the tarragon and salt and pepper.
Bring to the boil and then lower the heat to a simmer. Cover and allow to simmer VERY gently for about an hour. Have the other can of stout to hand to add a drop or two if it looks like drying up - you can always drink what you don't use!

In a separate frying pan heat a tablespoon of olive oil and fry the button mushrooms for a couple of minutes. Then add about a tablespoon of soy sauce and incorporate. Add the mushrooms to the beef and replace the lid and continue to simmer for another hour or so until the beef is tender - it should not be at all tough or chewy.

Remove the lid of the pot and increase the flame to allow the sauce to reduce to a thick gravy. Stir now and again to stop it from sticking. Don't make the flame too high or the beef will disintegrate.

Adjust for seasoning and serve with copious amounts of creamy mashed spuds and a simple steamed green vegetable such as runner beans or broccoli.
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  #38  
Old 28.11.2006, 11:24
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

Hi all,

A recipie exchange...what a great idea!!! I love to cook but I'm not very tidy...the kitchen always looks like a bomb site by the time I'm finished!!

As my Father is Swiss I have grown up with some Swiss foods and I also have a great cook book my Grandmother brought out to Australia for us many years ago and it's all in English! It has most of the basics in it so let me know what your looking for I might just have it!

I have also recently been emailed one of the Jamie Oliver cook books so if anyone wants a copy I'm happy to forward it on.




Nikki :-)
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  #39  
Old 08.12.2006, 21:34
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Re: Recipe Exchange anyone...

I noticed to day in the coop that they have horse meat. Does any one have any recipes?
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  #40  
Old 14.05.2007, 21:33
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My lamb kebab recipe

As my first post here is my favorite recipe. I use this on BBQs - change it for your tastes.
If you are looking for a kabab with a kick, this is it! Lamb is marinaded in a spicy blend of herbs, creating a flavourful lamb kabab.

Serves about 8 folk.
====INGREDIENTS:====
  • 2 lbs lamb fillet, cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 2 green peppers
  • 2 pints cherry tomatoes
  • 2 onions if you can find big ones (usually in turkish shop)
  • ---------------------------------------------------------------
  • For the marinade:
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric (or more if desired, depending on how spicy you want it)
  • pinch of ground red pepper or cayenne
====PREPARATION:====Up to 24 hours prior to grilling, combine marinade ingredients and pour into freezer bag. Place lamb cubes in marinade and refrigerate until ready to grill. Be sure all pieces of lamb are covered with marinade.
Wash and dry veggies. Cut green peppers and onions into 1 inch chunks. Set aside.

Prepare skewers by spraying a light coat of cooking oil to prevent sticking. Place lamb and vegetables on skewers. Grill spicy lamb kebabs for about 5-7 minutes on each side or until desired "doneness" - me and my husband like it black. Serve with tinned humus from the turkish shop cuccumber raiti from britshop.ch and mild lime pickle from Indians shops in Kreis 4
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