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  #21  
Old 01.03.2016, 18:01
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Re: Kosher salt

When I worked for a sugar refiner, the kosher sugar run required a Rabbi to be brought in from the local synagogue to supervise the process. Otherwise identical to non-kosher sugar. We did kosher brown sugar as well...
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  #22  
Old 01.03.2016, 18:02
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Re: Kosher salt

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And if you ever go to the FRench Jura, do visit the old salt evaporating pans at Lons-le-Saulnier. Very interesting.
About on par with watching paint dry?
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  #23  
Old 01.03.2016, 18:09
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Re: Kosher salt

LOL not quite - you don't have to stay until the water has evaporated

Reviews on Trip Advisor are all very positive.
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  #24  
Old 01.03.2016, 18:59
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Re: Kosher salt

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About on par with watching paint dry?
Actually no, the process is fascinating, especially if it is done on salt pans dating back from the Phoenicians, nice large crystals of fresh salt…..
hmmmm
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  #25  
Old 01.03.2016, 19:55
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Re: Kosher salt

If you haven't read it, Kurlansky's Book on the history of salt is very good.
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Old 01.03.2016, 20:36
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Re: Kosher salt

…can you use kosher salt to cure kosher bacon?
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  #27  
Old 01.03.2016, 20:39
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Re: Kosher salt

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…can you use kosher salt to cure kosher bacon?
Yes, but the two koshers cancel each other out and you're left with salty bacon, which everyone knows isn't kosher. Best to stick with your un-kosher-salted kosher bacon.
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  #28  
Old 01.03.2016, 20:46
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Re: Kosher salt

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…can you use kosher salt to cure kosher bacon?
Yes you can. You can do what you want with any food and call it want you want.
Religion doesn't trump everything else.

You couldn't sell it as Kosher though.

Coop now sell Maldon sea salt which are lovely flaky crystals of sea salt from Maldon which is a hellish place to keep a boat as it's just a load of mud when the tide's out.

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  #29  
Old 01.03.2016, 20:55
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Re: Kosher salt

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Yes, but the two koshers cancel each other out and you're left with salty bacon, which everyone knows isn't kosher. Best to stick with your un-kosher-salted kosher bacon.
and his noodly appendage would get very angry
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  #30  
Old 01.03.2016, 21:03
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Re: Kosher salt

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Yes, but the two koshers cancel each other out and you're left with salty bacon, which everyone knows isn't kosher. Best to stick with your un-kosher-salted kosher bacon.
Mmmm, un-kosher-saaaalted-kosher-bacon with kosher egg and kosher beans on kosher toast, can you get kosher HP sauce?
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  #31  
Old 01.03.2016, 21:31
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Re: Kosher salt

Got an reply:

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Hello aSwissInTheUS,
Thank you for contacting Morton Salt. To answer your first question, Morton® Kosher Salt does contain an anti-caking agent, while Morton® Canning and Pickling Salt is an all-natural, additive free product. To answer your second question, the anti-caking agent ingredient in Morton® Kosher Salt is Yellow Prussiate of Soda.

We hope you find this information helpful. Should you have additional questions or comments, simply reply to this email or contact us via our website at www.mortonsalt.com. Again, thank you for contacting Morton Salt.
Consumer Affairs & Engagement
Yellow Prussiate of Soda (Sodium ferrocyanide) is known in Europe as E536. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_ferrocyanide

Jura sel http://www.jurasel.ch uses E536 in some products and E341 (Calcium phosphate) in other products.

Last edited by aSwissInTheUS; 01.03.2016 at 21:47.
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  #32  
Old 29.01.2021, 12:35
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Re: Kosher salt

Just wanted to bump this up... did anyone find the white larger crystal flakey salt used in tons and tons of American recipes called Kosher Salt in Switzerland?

As people wrote above, this has nothing to do with cooking kosher food. This is the name of a widely used ingredient in the States (and maybe other areas of the world). A bunch of people recomended going to a kosher food store. Has anyone found kosher salt at a kosher food store? Or was his just a recomendation because of the name of this salt?

I've found larger crystal salt in the migros, which is chunky, not flakey. I am looking for bigger salt crystals, but flakey ones, not chunkey ones.

thanks!!!
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  #33  
Old 29.01.2021, 12:53
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Re: Kosher salt

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I've found larger crystal salt in the migros, which is chunky, not flakey. I am looking for bigger salt crystals, but flakey ones, not chunkey ones.
First off, salt is salt, so unless you're looking for stuff without added Iodine (why would you?) then it won't make any difference. Fancy salts can cost up to ten times as much as ordinary table salt and will make no difference to taste or nutritional content.

Second, what you're looking for has already been mentioned, called fleur de sel in French (Translates in German to Salz Blume, but I don't know if that name is used). It's just sea salt flakes.

But why do you want it, specifically?
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  #34  
Old 29.01.2021, 12:55
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Re: Kosher salt

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Just wanted to bump this up... did anyone find the white larger crystal flakey salt used in tons and tons of American recipes called Kosher Salt in Switzerland?
I am annoyed that it is "used" in so many recipes where its special texture is of absolutely no importance. Clear sign the recipe author did not put much of though into it and you should look out for other potential flaws.

And no, the texture and taste s not the same as Fluer de Sel which has is described as: natural unwashed, unrefined and additive-free salts from the sea, which means they are richer in minerals (magnesium, calcium, potassium) and trace elements, and have a relatively high moisture content. Whereas Kosher salt is made from refined sea salt or rock salt, has rinse additives, might be iodinated, and has a low moisture content.

Now, where to get it? American Food Avenue had it in the past.
https://afoodave.ch/products/diamond...76fe8057&_ss=r

Problem with salt: It is "regulated". The cantons have a monopole and you will need a import license if you import more than 50 kg per year. https://www.ezv.admin.ch/dam/ezv/en/...alzregal_e.pdf

As it is the beginning of a new year, check with the above shop when they expect the next delivery or import it your self. A Kilogramm will last a long time when only use it where you actually need the special texture. And salt does not go bad. If stored correctly, where it does not take up smell, you can use it literally in a billion years.
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  #35  
Old 29.01.2021, 13:10
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Re: Kosher salt

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Just wanted to bump this up... did anyone find the white larger crystal flakey salt used in tons and tons of American recipes called Kosher Salt in Switzerland?

As people wrote above, this has nothing to do with cooking kosher food. This is the name of a widely used ingredient in the States (and maybe other areas of the world). A bunch of people recomended going to a kosher food store. Has anyone found kosher salt at a kosher food store? Or was his just a recomendation because of the name of this salt?

I've found larger crystal salt in the migros, which is chunky, not flakey. I am looking for bigger salt crystals, but flakey ones, not chunkey ones.

thanks!!!
I bought some flaky salt from Coop, it's excellent actually
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  #36  
Old 29.01.2021, 13:22
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Re: Kosher salt

PS: After this one might have the impression that I am a bit salty about this topic. Which is actually true:

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  #37  
Old 29.01.2021, 13:59
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Re: Kosher salt

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I am annoyed that it is "used" in so many recipes where its special texture is of absolutely no importance.
What are examples of recipes where its special texture is of absolutely importance?

Tom
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  #38  
Old 29.01.2021, 14:13
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Re: Kosher salt

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Chemically it's no different to normal salt. Just very large crystals and tends to have fewer additives (iodine, anti-clumping agents for example), our american cousins think it's superior to our salt for some reason.
Sel de Guérande should be very similar then. Natural sea salt, no additives, not whitened, coarse texture, etc.

Last edited by JackieH; 29.01.2021 at 16:12.
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  #39  
Old 29.01.2021, 14:32
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What are examples of recipes where its special texture is of absolutely importance?
And how do you get it to retain that texture when it's been added to wet ingredients?

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I am annoyed that it is "used" in so many recipes where its special texture is of absolutely no importance. Clear sign the recipe author did not put much of though into it and you should look out for other potential flaws.
Not necessarily, it's just thought of as a default. In a similar vein, many UK TV cooks are always keen to specify "Sea Salt" and often use the flakes thereof, as if it's somehow different and better.

It's all a nonsense, IMO.
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  #40  
Old 29.01.2021, 14:53
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Re: Kosher salt

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What are examples of recipes where its special texture is of absolutely importance?

Tom
On fresh cucumbers. On a steak. On a margarita glass. Edame. Pretzel.
(Not that Kosher salt is the perfect or appropriate use in those instances).

It is another sensation when you let the flakes melt on your tongue, have big crystals, or all is evenly coated with a fine powder Btw. the toungue is not as strictly divided into taste zones as mybe thought in school ).

Kosher salt has a lower packing density than regular table salt. One might use less if measured by the volume. But if one season to taste or measures by weight instead of volume this is hardly an issue.

Considering Swiss soil is rather low in iodine, iodized salt is a must in goiter prevention. Better to not cook with non iodized salt alone. And as far as I can taste there is no difference in taste.

If you need a pure salt w/o additives then you might opt for dishwasher salt. Which is a very pure salt w/o additives. If you are still concerned about potential contamination you should better stay away from non refined sea salt which could be considered as rather filthy in contrast.

Quote:
Not necessarily, it's just thought of as a default. In a similar vein, many UK TV cooks are always keen to specify "Sea Salt" and often use the flakes thereof, as if it's somehow different and better.
The default would and should be "salt".
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