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View Poll Results: How do you deal with food in your fridge past its best before date?
I always check dates and throw away anything that's on or past the date. 2 1.37%
I check dates and make sure to use everything within the date. 10 6.85%
I keep an eye on dates and use nose, eyes and brain to determine what's still good to eat 101 69.18%
I only buy enough food to last a couple of days, so this never happens. 12 8.22%
I just eat stuff without really looking at the dates. 13 8.90%
What's a best before date? 4 2.74%
What's a fridge? 4 2.74%
Voters: 146. You may not vote on this poll

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  #21  
Old 26.08.2016, 13:01
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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Does anyone know if CH labels are regulated?
To my knowledge the only items that require a "best by" date in CH are baby food items. There was a program about this very topic on RTS1 a few months ago.

Obviously with meat and seafood freshness is key, otherwise I keep most stuff way past the recommended date, unless it totally moldy. The most ridiculous are cases of sauce/dressing with a bottle marked "refrigerate and eat within 3 days", but servings are tablespoon-sized.

Anecdotally, when we recently left for a two-week vacation, we emptied and turned the fridge off. All those half-empty bottles went to the somewhat cool cellar, and I'm still alive and well after having finishing them when I was back.
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  #22  
Old 26.08.2016, 14:04
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

Best trick for bread: cut a loaf in half or buy the small brötli, take what you need for 1-2 days, freeze the rest.

When you want to eat, but the frozen bread directly in over, turn on to 200 degrees. By the time the oven reaches 200, your bread is as good as new! Fresh outta the oven!

Works with Bretzeln as well!
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  #23  
Old 26.08.2016, 14:06
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

Just not very environmentally friendly by having to turn your oven on?


I just take a bag out of the freezer the night before and it is thawed by the time I get up (well, actually a lot of time before that but as it is covered it doesn´t dry out)
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  #24  
Old 26.08.2016, 14:17
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

Slightly OT - I rotate the bottles in the fridge so that the bottles at the front are the ones that have been on the shelf longest (and hence coolest).

I am considering consulting to Migros in order to implement such a system in their takeaway coolers.
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  #25  
Old 26.08.2016, 14:21
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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Slightly OT - I rotate the bottles in the fridge so that the bottles at the front are the ones that have been on the shelf longest (and hence coolest).
You get through them so fast that the time to cool plays a role?

I'm impressed.

If I had that kind of intake I probably wouldn't bother putting them in the fridge.
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  #26  
Old 26.08.2016, 14:22
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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Just not very environmentally friendly by having to turn your oven on?
Who cares! Fresh bread!
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  #27  
Old 26.08.2016, 14:24
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

If all the 'best by/until' malarkey would be true, I should be dead about 50 times over.

I regularly make sweet and savoury preserves of all kinds, store them in the cellar and we eat or drink them, sometimes up to 4 years after I made them.

We are all healthy and thriving.

Shop just as much fresh producecas you know you'll use.

Look at it, smell it, taste a little bit and then decide what to do with it.

Even with not as perky looking veges and fruits one can still make a lot of dishes.
Eggs that are around 12 weeks old are still good for baking cakes.
Stale bread can be made into bread crumbs.
The green of a sprouting onion can be used like chives (tho' not the bulb!)
Too dried out cheese can be grated and used up this way


I actually hate this religion of that best by beliefs....what happened to common sense??
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  #28  
Old 26.08.2016, 14:45
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

What is the actual impact of throwing away food?

Sure, I've been admonished to think about the starving in Africa before I throw away food. But its not like I could somehow mail it to them.

As far as buying food in excess, does it actually deprive someone else of it? Does it not actually lower the price of food? Or is it simply sacrilege?
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  #29  
Old 26.08.2016, 15:39
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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I hardly throw anything out; just the occasional part-eaten loaf of bread which I don't finish fast enough, however here even those seem to just go hard rather than mouldy, so I can toast/grill it and save it that way.
I don't even throw old bread away: it's perfect for gazpachos and/or croutons

The way we eat chez Marple, hardly anything gets the opportunity to go off... Our waists are the proof...
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  #30  
Old 26.08.2016, 15:58
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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I don't even throw old bread away: it's perfect for gazpachos and/or croutons
If you ever find yourself hankering for a gaspacho or croutons but you've got no, or only fresh bread, just get in the car and drive until you reach an agricultural area. A great many of the farmhouses around here have a covered box down at the end of the drive.

Look for the signs that say "Altbrot"
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  #31  
Old 26.08.2016, 16:07
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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What is the actual impact of throwing away food?

Sure, I've been admonished to think about the starving in Africa before I throw away food. But its not like I could somehow mail it to them.

As far as buying food in excess, does it actually deprive someone else of it? Does it not actually lower the price of food? Or is it simply sacrilege?
If you don't buy as much, not as much needs to be produced, shipped, stored and managed, so there's a significant environmental impact from just that side, coupled with the additional impact of disposing of all the extra waste. Plus you have more money in your pocket, which you could, if you wanted, then donate to charities helping those self-same starving Africans.
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  #32  
Old 26.08.2016, 16:10
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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I don't even throw old bread away: it's perfect for gazpachos and/or croutons
Stale and dry, yes, but not mouldy. As I mentioned, most bread here just dries out but occasionally I've had some go mouldy.
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  #33  
Old 26.08.2016, 16:15
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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I regularly make sweet and savoury preserves of all kinds, store them in the cellar and we eat or drink them, sometimes up to 4 years after I made them.
Amateur. I've been doing some preserving of our garden produce the last few weeks, notably my splendid mirabelle, ginger and rosemary jam, and rotating some of the stuff in the cellar, and there's quite a few things from 2004 or earlier. A wonderful apple-based chutney we'd forgotten about, for example, and some cherries in rum which after twelve years are perfectly wonderful.
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  #34  
Old 26.08.2016, 16:27
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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What is the actual impact of throwing away food?

Sure, I've been admonished to think about the starving in Africa before I throw away food. But its not like I could somehow mail it to them.

As far as buying food in excess, does it actually deprive someone else of it? Does it not actually lower the price of food? Or is it simply sacrilege?
For us as individuals:

I think it is formost a question of economics: You will save money.

As Ace1 wrote, there is a certain chain of logic put forth, but I am not sure if you as an individual are going to have much influence on the chain of production. Think of how long a Boycott takes until it starts to effect change, and consider how a Boycott sends an explicit message. It isn't as if some boffin in Morocco is going to look up from his screen and mumble "Hang on a minute, Phos only bought half as many lemons as last week! Production!, Ship 3 less lemons this week".

There is an element of collective action, and mindful consumption to the issue, which is (to my mind) a good thing, but this in and of itself, isn't going to help anyone starving in some particular place.

Finally, the less you waste, the less often you have to make the trip to the green container.
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  #35  
Old 26.08.2016, 16:43
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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Amateur. I've been doing some preserving of our garden produce the last few weeks, notably my splendid mirabelle, ginger and rosemary jam, and rotating some of the stuff in the cellar, and there's quite a few things from 2004 or earlier. A wonderful apple-based chutney we'd forgotten about, for example, and some cherries in rum which after twelve years are perfectly wonderful.
but be careful with chinese food
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  #36  
Old 26.08.2016, 17:10
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

I'm in the camp of "check the sell-by dates, but use your judgement/smell/taste/etc.".

I generally don't throw things away, but I am rarely home, and "home", right now, it's two different houses anyway. When I am home, I have a lot of work functions and the occasional social ones, so eating at home is a luxury more than reality. My husband is generally home more than I am, but he is on the road a lot too, and accompanies me on a lot of the above functions.

Hence, we tend to do a "big shop/big cookout" for non-perishables and stuff to cook and freeze immediately (we are big fan of wholesome, homemade freezer cooking) once a month, then we just buy perishable stuff enough for a couple/few days, in limited quantities, so waste is minimal if at all. With the variety of options, we are never short of food but do not waste, my husband has delicious homemade meals every day that he is at home but I am not, and...even if you can barely boil an egg (e.g. my husband), warming up turkey chilli, tossing together a salad, or putting in the over a portion of homemade lasagne is not hard.

We are not perfect and we too forget the occasional can of beans on the bottom drawer that expired 2 years ago so that goes in the bin!
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  #37  
Old 26.08.2016, 17:46
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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For us as individuals:

I think it is formost a question of economics: You will save money.
......

There is an element of collective action, and mindful consumption to the issue, which is (to my mind) a good thing, but this in and of itself, isn't going to help anyone starving in some particular place.

Finally, the less you waste, the less often you have to make the trip to the green container.
It may save me money, but I don't think it saves me time.

What I am wondering about is if excess shopping and wasting of food contributes to scarcity for less fortunate people, or actually supports more food production and lowers its cost for hungry people elsewhere.
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  #38  
Old 26.08.2016, 17:52
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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Amateur. I've been doing some preserving of our garden produce the last few weeks, notably my splendid mirabelle, ginger and rosemary jam, and rotating some of the stuff in the cellar, and there's quite a few things from 2004 or earlier. A wonderful apple-based chutney we'd forgotten about, for example, and some cherries in rum which after twelve years are perfectly wonderful.
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I regularly make sweet and savoury preserves of all kinds, store them in the cellar and we eat or drink them, sometimes up to 4 years after I made them.
You're both amateurs. When we were clearing out my late aunt's house recently we found jars and bottles of stuff she's preserved as far back as 1947 and it all looked perfectly fine.
I have to say the sloe gin was actually rather good although I didn't dare try the jam.
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  #39  
Old 26.08.2016, 18:07
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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It may save me money, but I don't think it saves me time.

What I am wondering about is if excess shopping and wasting of food contributes to scarcity for less fortunate people, or actually supports more food production and lowers its cost for hungry people elsewhere.
If anything, I would say more the opposite. If we double demand for onions, then Morocco (and the rest of the producing nations) would produce twice as much, possibly requiring something close to twice the (local) labour.

Regardless of how many onions you purchase, you won't help people starving in some place like Borundi, unless they also happen to produce onions.

Call me cynical if you will, but I suspect that unless you double or halve your consumption of some product grown in the 3rd world it probably won't have an appreciable effect at the level of the pickers. The generation of value, and the absorption of loss are not distributed evenly or equably along the whole supply chain.

I am by no means an economist but it isn't as simple as saying "Law of supply and demand", markets are a bit more complex than that.
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Old 26.08.2016, 18:08
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Re: Poll: throwing food away.

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...Too dried out cheese can be grated and used up this way...
The Swiss way is to make fondue, surely?
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