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Old 20.07.2017, 13:42
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Cornflour?

Anyone suggest where I can find cornflour (for thickening etc.)? I've looked in the supermarket baking sections but no luck so far.
Thanks.
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Old 20.07.2017, 13:46
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Re: Cornflour?

Just get this from Migros...

https://produkte.migros.ch/alnatura-maismehl

The Italian name for it is Farina di mais.

Last edited by Blueangel; 20.07.2017 at 14:05.
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Old 20.07.2017, 13:53
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Re: Cornflour?

look for Maizena, usually in the flour/sugar section.
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Old 20.07.2017, 14:31
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Re: Cornflour?

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The Italian name for it is Farina di mais.
No, the Italian name is 'amido di mais', aka, Maizena.

'Farina di mais' is what is used to make polenta.

Tom

Last edited by st2lemans; 20.07.2017 at 14:58. Reason: spelling
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Old 20.07.2017, 14:40
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Re: Cornflour?

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No, the Italian name is 'amidon de mais', aka, Maizena.

Tom
'amidon de mais' is French
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Old 20.07.2017, 14:41
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Re: Cornflour?

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look for Maizena, usually in the flour/sugar section.
I always thought that Maizena was what it was called here but I was surprised to find that it's the brand name. I suppose the capital M is a clue.
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Old 20.07.2017, 14:55
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Re: Cornflour?

I use ordinary flour. What's Maizena's advantage?

(btw there's also "Saucenbinder", the advantage is this doesn't clot)
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Old 20.07.2017, 15:57
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Re: Cornflour?

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I use ordinary flour. What's Maizena's advantage?

(btw there's also "Saucenbinder", the advantage is this doesn't clot)
Cornflour, aka cornstarch (in the US), gives a smoother result than wheat flour and is much less prone to form lumps. As a result, and also because it doesn't really need to be cooked so much, it can be added (mixed with just a little liquid) much later on in cooking process. Perfect for thickening gravy or sauces.

Also, of course, it's gluten free, for those who are sensitive to that (plus all the trendy bandwagon jumpers, of course).

'Saucenbinder' is just a preparation of cornflour with emulsifiers so that you can add it directly as a powder.
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Old 20.07.2017, 16:22
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Re: Cornflour?

Useful stuff! Thanks everyone - I think I have a better idea what I'm looking for now. (I believe I ordered it from Britshop last time, but thought there must be a local version.)


C.
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Old 20.07.2017, 16:22
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Re: Cornflour?

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Cornflour, aka cornstarch (in the US), gives a smoother result than wheat flour and is much less prone to form lumps. As a result, and also because it doesn't really need to be cooked so much, it can be added (mixed with just a little liquid) much later on in cooking process. Perfect for thickening gravy or sauces.

Also, of course, it's gluten free, for those who are sensitive to that (plus all the trendy bandwagon jumpers, of course).

'Saucenbinder' is just a preparation of cornflour with emulsifiers so that you can add it directly as a powder.
I was under the impression that corn flour uses the whole grain and corn starch is just the extracted starch, which is preferred for thickening sauces. If it's for sauces, I use this:

cornflour-starch.jpg
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Old 20.07.2017, 16:25
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Re: Cornflour?

Ace is right. I'm sure the OP is looking for cornstarch. I've never seen it in the romande because we thicken our sauces here with a roux. Try Asian markets. I think they use it in wok applications.
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Old 20.07.2017, 16:48
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I was under the impression that corn flour uses the whole grain and corn starch is just the extracted starch, which is preferred for thickening sauces.
Technically I think you're correct, as is reflected in the other languages' names for it, but cornflour (one word) in the UK is definitely the same as the US cornstarch. Real corn flour would be what the Italians call polenta, as Tom pointed out.

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Ace is right. I'm sure the OP is looking for cornstarch. I've never seen it in the romande because we thicken our sauces here with a roux. Try Asian markets. I think they use it in wok applications.
It's certainly available in normal supermarkets in France and French-speaking Switzerland. And in any case a roux can be made from either corn or wheat flour, giving just a very slightly different flavour and texture.
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Old 20.07.2017, 17:09
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Re: Cornflour?

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Ace is right. I'm sure the OP is looking for cornstarch. I've never seen it in the romande because we thicken our sauces here with a roux. Try Asian markets. I think they use it in wok applications.
Huh??? There is Maizen in every store! Every store. And that is not an exaggeration.
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Old 20.07.2017, 17:16
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Re: Cornflour?

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I've never seen it in the romande because we thicken our sauces here with a roux.
How do they make cheese fondue there without it?

Tom
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Old 20.07.2017, 17:36
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Re: Cornflour?

Here's what it looks like:

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Old 20.07.2017, 18:10
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Re: Cornflour?

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'amidon de mais' is French
Born and bred Swiss French speaker and never ever heard it called that. Maizena is indeed the stuff- and available in every store indeed
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Old 20.07.2017, 18:34
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Re: Cornflour?

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Born and bred Swiss French speaker and never ever heard it called that. Maizena is indeed the stuff- and available in every store indeed
Don't they have a Coop in your region Odile?
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Old 20.07.2017, 19:46
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Re: Cornflour?

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Born and bred Swiss French speaker and never ever heard it called that.
Try reading the label:



Tom
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Old 20.07.2017, 21:06
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Re: Cornflour?

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Try reading the label:



Tom
No Odile has heard of Maizena sh hasn't heard of it being called 'amidon de mais' I guess at least in Switzerland, but here most things are generally named after the most famous product. Like a Stapler is always called a Bostich!

Ahaha I see it written on the box in the picture, I stand corrected.

I wrote that on my Handy so didn't get a good look. But I will stand by my comment that people often use brand names as the general name for similar products in Switzerland.

Last edited by TobiasM; 21.07.2017 at 10:28.
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Old 20.07.2017, 21:37
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Re: Cornflour?

Quite enlightening. Not sure how I overlooked Maizena. Here's the British version - sounds like it probably is cornstarch even though it's called cornflour!

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