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Old 07.11.2017, 12:21
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Making a Fondue

So I plan to give this a go.

If I buy a bag of pre grated cheese from coop/migros, what is in this bag? Do I still need to add cornflour, wine and kirsche?

If I need to add wine, how much for a 2 person fondue?

Is grappa as good as kirsche to add and is it just a shot, more or less?

My plan based on the above, and I have never made it before. Heat up pre grated bag of cheese, throw in wine, grappa, chillies, mushrooms and abit of garlic

In theory does this work and is how I make a fondue?
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Old 07.11.2017, 12:25
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Re: Making a Fondue

All will be written on the back of the packet, it varies, some need wine, other not etc..

Aligro sells fantastic fondues, Fondue de l'Artisan is the best.
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Old 07.11.2017, 12:30
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Re: Making a Fondue

Don't throw the garlic in. Rub the inside of the caquelon with peeled garlic, but don't add the garlic to the cheese.

Re. the Coop cheese, it depends what's in the package! If it's just cheese (probably two cheeses -- moitié-moitié), then yes, you'll need to add the wine, pepper, etc. yourself.

The basic concept that you describe is fine (except for the garlic).

In its simplest form:

Rub caquelon with garlic
Melt grated cheese (400-500g for two) in caquelon on the stove. Keep stirring
Add dry white wine to taste -- 2 dL should do it for two
Add a drizzle of kirsch (a shot is way too much)
Add pepper and spices-- nutmeg is usual, anything else you want is fine
Put caquelon over burner, dunk bread/potato/whatever, enjoy.

If you want the REALLY simple form, buy the long-life (unrefrigerated) fondue blocks -- e.g. Gerber. All you need to do is heat them up.

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Old 07.11.2017, 12:50
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Re: Making a Fondue

There are packs of fresh fondue that arent quite as bad as the Gerber stuff available in the cheese department of every supermarket. Dont tell any Swiss, but the one with prosecco they sell at Lidl is actually really good.

Top tip since the OP has never done it: No matter if you buy a pack where you need to add wine or not, the secret is to heat the cheese SLOWLY... and stir it a lot.
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Old 07.11.2017, 12:51
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Re: Making a Fondue

Hi 22 Yards,


Can you please specify: type of dry wine, and spices beyond nutmeg?


Thanks!
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Old 07.11.2017, 13:17
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Hi 22 Yards,


Can you please specify: type of dry wine, and spices beyond nutmeg?


Thanks!
I wouldn't rely on an Australian for information on fondue...

1. I'd never add anything else than black pepper, salt and nutmeg.
2. You will hardly taste the wine, so any dry white wine will do. Don't buy anything more than 5-7 CHF for it... in my opinion the dryer the better.
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:09
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Hi 22 Yards,


Can you please specify: type of dry wine, and spices beyond nutmeg?


Thanks!
Surprisingly, the German has it about right. Wine as dry as you can find, and the spices are purely up to the individual. Personally, I like the traditional, minimalist approach (mushrooms?!), but as everybody knows, everything is better with Aromat.

Being Australian, I knew nothing about fondue -- until I married a wonderful Gruérienne, who knows more about fondue than anyone would have thought possible.
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:16
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Re: Making a Fondue

OP,

You will learn everything by watching Die Schweizermacher, including a good recipe for fondue...

(Not really)
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:17
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Re: Making a Fondue

Am I the only one who puts Maizena in it?
And I put the wine in, then the Maizena and then the cheese.

If it doesn't want to bind properly, or 'parts' during eating process (if the spirit burner to keep it warm goes out it sometimes does), slosh in a little bit of lemon juice. If that doesn't do the trick, mix a bit of maizena with a spot of lemon juice and mix that in well.

The Swiss on here will probably shout me down, but I've made quite a lot of fondue in my life...
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:21
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Am I the only one who puts Maizena in it?
And I put the wine in, then the Maizena and then the cheese.

If it doesn't want to bind properly, or 'parts' during eating process (if the spirit burner to keep it warm goes out it sometimes does), slosh in a little bit of lemon juice. If that doesn't do the trick, mix a bit of maizena with a spot of lemon juice and mix that in well.

The Swiss on here will probably shout me down, but I've made quite a lot of fondue in my life...
Add Maizena? Why, oh why? It's a sacrilege.
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:28
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Re: Making a Fondue

Sounds like you're all set, good luck and like all cooking you'll find the first time is experimenting and you'll find out what works for you and what doesn't over time although the time bit matters because I suspect like many a fondue is something you look forward to but once done it's a while until you make the next.

The next question is what to drink with the meal and this might help http://www.dw.com/en/zurich-study-se...ate/a-14731202
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:38
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Don't throw the garlic in. Rub the inside of the caquelon with peeled garlic, but don't add the garlic to the cheese.
Wrong.

Tom
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:43
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Rub caquelon with garlic
Yes, but leave the garlic in. We use a whole head.

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Melt grated cheese (400-500g for two) in caquelon on the stove.
Wrong.

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Add dry white wine to taste -- 2 dL should do it for two
Wrong again. Add half as much wine as cheese BEFORE adding the cheese, which has been dredged with corn starch, and add the cheese a handful at a time ONCE THE WINE IS SIMMERING!

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Add a drizzle of kirsch (a shot is way too much)
No, a shot is correct (for two people).

99 is clearly using an Aussie recipe.

Tom
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:45
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Wrong.

Tom
Out of curiosity, how much garlic do you add?
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Old 07.11.2017, 14:45
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Am I the only one who puts Maizena in it?
Flour or potato starch also work, but cornstarch (maizena) is traditional and best.

Tom
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Old 07.11.2017, 15:34
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Re: Making a Fondue

And read "Asterix in Switzerland"
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Old 07.11.2017, 15:36
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Am I the only one who puts Maizena in it?
And I put the wine in, then the Maizena and then the cheese.

If it doesn't want to bind properly, or 'parts' during eating process (if the spirit burner to keep it warm goes out it sometimes does), slosh in a little bit of lemon juice. If that doesn't do the trick, mix a bit of maizena with a spot of lemon juice and mix that in well.

The Swiss on here will probably shout me down, but I've made quite a lot of fondue in my life...
I am very reliably informed that Maizena does indeed go into a traditional Swiss fondue.

As for Mr "Wrong" "Wrong" "Wrong ", I will take the word of a Gruérian with 500 years of fondue-making heritage over a pasta-slurping Ticeneso any day. As it happens, she confirms that the wine goes in first (with the Maizena), then the cheese (thereby agreeing with Longbyt and angry Mr Wrong) . But the addition of garlic to the actual fondue (not just rubbing the caquelon) is an optional practice, most likely found amongst American emigrés to non-fondue-eating areas of Switzerland. It's up there with mushrooms and chilies.

My Gruérian insider also notes that the cheese can be melted first, then the wine added, but the presence of wine already in the caquelon makes the melting process easier. She also has a closely-guarded family secret, a special ingredient that makes the fondue lighter and more easily digested, but if I told you, it wouldn't be a secret any more...
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Old 07.11.2017, 16:44
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Re: Making a Fondue

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the addition of garlic to the actual fondue (not just rubbing the caquelon) is an optional practice, most likely found amongst American emigrés to non-fondue-eating areas of Switzerland. It's up there with mushrooms and chilies.
Actually, I picked it up from die-hard Swiss bikers in the Zuri-oberland (which is where my pseudo-Ticense wife's family is also from).

Mushrooms, I first had in France, and chiles in AG with Swiss friends Andreas and Heidi (who also used garlic in the fondue, and sold me their car before emigrating to the US)

Tom
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Old 07.11.2017, 16:45
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Re: Making a Fondue

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She also has a closely-guarded family secret, a special ingredient that makes the fondue lighter and more easily digested, but if I told you, it wouldn't be a secret any more...
Baking soda, or so I'm told.

Tom
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Old 07.11.2017, 16:55
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Re: Making a Fondue

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Baking soda, or so I'm told.

Tom
Great secret that turned out to be...
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