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  #21  
Old 02.05.2019, 17:14
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Re: What's "Siedfleisch" called at the Turkish shop?

The cuts of Siedfleisch you get in a supermarket here are normally too small for really good results with smoking. Can work though.

Lozís Treatment for Siedfleisch (and this is my go to when thereís a chill in air as we will have at the weekend)
  1. Brown the Siedfleisch in a large stock pot top and bottom (donít remove any fat, from the meat, itís very important here)
  2. Remove from the heat, fill the pot up with as many stock vegetables as you can (carrots, onions, leeks, celery, celeriac). If the veg is clean then thereís no need to peel.
  3. Also throw into the pan a few marrow bones if you have them.
  4. Throw in a few bay leaves and a teaspoon of peppercorns
  5. Fill the pot with water until the contents are just covered
  6. Bring to a barely murmuring simmer (very important) and leave for at least 4 hours
  7. Remove veg and bin it (itís done its job), remove bones and meat (should be very tender)
  8. Boil down the stock/soup a little under a high heat. Add salt and pepper now.
  9. Bulk up the soup and with a carb of your choice - cooked macaroni, dumplings and sliced pancakes work well. Also throw back in any marrow from the bones.
  10. Serve the soup with thick slices of Siedfleisch on the side. Meat may need salting, horseradish and cranberry sauce (really) make good accompaniments.
  11. Wash down with 2-3 bottles of decent Primitivo
  12. Youíre welcome.
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  #22  
Old 03.05.2019, 08:09
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Re: What's "Siedfleisch" called at the Turkish shop?

We recently bought this from a Fleisch Discount shop. I think they are actually butchers so the pieces are quite big compared to super market and much cheaper.

We had one piece of 2.5 kg and 2 pieces of 1 kg each. With the big piece I made beef rendang. Cooking took a full 4 hours but the end result was fabulous.
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  #23  
Old 06.05.2019, 13:41
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Re: What's "Siedfleisch" called at the Turkish shop?

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Guess I'm addressing people who have been here a long time as "Siedfleisch" in English seems to be simply "boiled beef", LOL.
Siedfleisch is from the chest of the beef and not simply the whole cow.

Anyway, if I wanted to buy that in the Turkish shop, what would I ask for?

And while I'm at it asking stupid questions: Is there "Siedfleisch" from lamb? (And what would I ask for if I wanted to buy that at the Turkish shop?)

Before you crucify me: The boys at that shop are all very, very limited at languages I speak and my Turkish is inexistent. But the meat they sell is fabulous.

You should ask for "D÷Ş" in Turkish. Turkish people cut the meat in different ways than they do in Europe. Luckily D÷Ş corresponds to the exact place where siedfleisch would be cut off.
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  #24  
Old 11.09.2019, 13:41
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Re: What's "Siedfleisch" called at the Turkish shop?

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You should ask for "D÷Ş" in Turkish. Turkish people cut the meat in different ways than they do in Europe. Luckily D÷Ş corresponds to the exact place where siedfleisch would be cut off.
Thank you for this straight forward answer!

I've not been here the past months so the thanks-button is no longer available.
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  #25  
Old 12.09.2019, 02:09
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Re: What's "Siedfleisch" called at the Turkish shop?

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The cuts of Siedfleisch you get in a supermarket here are normally too small for really good results with smoking. Can work though.

Lozís Treatment for Siedfleisch (and this is my go to when thereís a chill in air as we will have at the weekend)
  1. Brown the Siedfleisch in a large stock pot top and bottom (donít remove any fat, from the meat, itís very important here)
  2. Remove from the heat, fill the pot up with as many stock vegetables as you can (carrots, onions, leeks, celery, celeriac). If the veg is clean then thereís no need to peel.
  3. Also throw into the pan a few marrow bones if you have them.
  4. Throw in a few bay leaves and a teaspoon of peppercorns
  5. Fill the pot with water until the contents are just covered
  6. Bring to a barely murmuring simmer (very important) and leave for at least 4 hours
  7. Remove veg and bin it (itís done its job), remove bones and meat (should be very tender)
  8. Boil down the stock/soup a little under a high heat. Add salt and pepper now.
  9. Bulk up the soup and with a carb of your choice - cooked macaroni, dumplings and sliced pancakes work well. Also throw back in any marrow from the bones.
  10. Serve the soup with thick slices of Siedfleisch on the side. Meat may need salting, horseradish and cranberry sauce (really) make good accompaniments.
  11. Wash down with 2-3 bottles of decent Primitivo
  12. Youíre welcome.
As a variation

Not in every version is the meat browned
In some versions the veg is browned and then a shot of brandy is added (be careful)

The veg should be chunky

Some people us wine in addition or inplace of the water

You can leave the veg in.
Once the stewed veg has been remove, you can add fresh raw veg
Always add cabbage along with potatoes and cook for 15 - 20 mins


then

serve cooking broth as a soup on it's own (I have seen pasta being added or croutons)
put the meat and the veg on a big platter and serve as the main course along with mustard etc.- Note if practical, use the same bowls as the soup was served in. The broth can now act as gravy

The next day

use the broth as the stock for a risotto
or use it along with any left over veg as the basis for soup (could include any left over meat)

Use the left over meat for a ragu with paste (even better with a tomato sauce)
or even as a filler for a couple slices of bread
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