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-   -   Recipes Worth a try (https://www.englishforum.ch/food-drink/297355-recipes-worth-try.html)

k_and_e 23.03.2020 14:12

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bowlie (Post 3162385)
And I thought they said ... smakelijk eten

both versions are correct

slammer 23.03.2020 14:15

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
It´s Bärlauch and you can smell it, unless you have a cold or something.

Blueangel 23.03.2020 14:22

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eastenders
My favourite way of cooking a whole chicken and to get it moist inside yet crispy skin, is to line a baking tray with tinfoil, place an opened can of beer in the middle and sit the seasoned chicken upright onto that can.

My favourite way to roast chicken is stuff with a handful of fresh tarragon, cut the ends off 2 lemons, heavily score along the lemons so the juice can run out, insert one in each end of the chicken and plug with with more tarragon. Roast breast down until the last 25mins, then breast up to crisp.

curley 23.03.2020 14:36

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bowlie (Post 3162385)
And I thought they said ... smakelijk eten

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_and_e (Post 3162404)
both versions are correct

Now I wouldn't object a Dutch guy, but isn't smakelijk eten tasty food while Eet smakelijk! is "bon appétit","en Guete" or "enjoy your meal", saying it when starting a meal?

However, no idea why it crossed my mind in Dutch when I wrote it. Maybe my mind refuses to accept closed borders. :)

k_and_e 23.03.2020 14:57

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by curley (Post 3162429)
Now I wouldn't object a Dutch guy, but isn't smakelijk eten tasty food while Eet smakelijk! is "bon appétit","en Guete" or "enjoy your meal", saying it when starting a meal?

However, no idea why it crossed my mind in Dutch when I wrote it. Maybe my mind refuses to accept closed borders. :)

No, it's the same. Tasty food would be lekker eten.

Blueangel 23.03.2020 15:14

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Betty Bossi puts all 120 cookbooks online for free

So that the recipes never run out in times of quarantine and home office, Betty Bossi makes all recipes available online. That and other news from the world of cuisine.
https://www.20min.ch/kochenmitfooby/...nline-21063305

grumpygrapefruit 23.03.2020 15:14

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by k_and_e (Post 3162442)
No, it's the same. Tasty food would be lekker eten.

I was at my Dutch GF's parents house just after we first met, and here mother (a wonderful cook) told me that Lekker means delicious. So I said "so i can say my GF is Lekker?"

Her mother went bright red and my girlfriend had to look away. Luckily her father is a little deaf and doesn't speak much English!

k_and_e 23.03.2020 15:15

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by grumpygrapefruit (Post 3162448)
I was at my Dutch GF's parents house just after we first met, and here mother (a wonderful cook) told me that Lekker means delicious. So I said "so i can say my GF is Lekker?"

Her mother went bright red and my girlfriend had to look away. Luckily her father is a little deaf and doesn't speak much English!

you would describe her as lekker to your friends, not to her mother...

Blueangel 23.03.2020 15:17

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by grumpygrapefruit (Post 3162448)
So I said "so i can say my GF is Lekker?"

Her mother went bright red and my girlfriend had to look away. Luckily her father is a little deaf and doesn't speak much English!

And if a Saffa says that to you, watch your back ;) :D

Cherub 23.03.2020 15:24

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
I've always been a great one for making big pans of soup as it uses up any old veg kicking around, it's also great when you don't have a lot of spare cash to splurge. Last night we had spicy potato and leek. I also love using up leftovers as you can make yummy meals from them and I batch cook for the freezer. A slow cooker is great because you can use cheap cuts of meat.

We haven't really encountered any shortages of anything in Basel (although it wasn't easy to find liquid hand soap locally last week, eventually found some on Friday).

My thing at the moment is making things go a lot further even though there's just 2 of us. I grew up with parents who were married during WW2 and had to cope with all the rationing Britain had until the mid 50s. My mum was a cook in the WAAF and she taught me everything, so we've never starved. My Scottish grandmother had 9 children, my Northern Irish one 16 plus another 2 that died in infancy, they lived through WW1, The Depression and then WW2 but they survived on very little. In this difficult time I think about how they had to cope.

Luckily I have 2 pieces of Black Angus fillet steak in my freezer which I plan to cook on Friday as it's our 34th wedding anniversary and of course there is no place to go out to.

Mrs. Doolittle 23.03.2020 15:45

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
1 Attachment(s)
Have you ever walked by the bananas in the supermarket which are full of brown spots, possibly totally brown, with a reduced price and wondered what can you do with these? The answer is bake with them.

Ripe bananas are great to bake with. You can also mash them up and freeze them for later use.

I have no idea why there are very few baked goods with bananas in Switzerland. I have been making muffins for years. They are easy to make so your kids can help. I use a hand mixer but this is not esential. They freeze well (don't freeze them if the bananas were previously frozen).

The kids insisted I add chocolate chips. I also have mini muffin tins which I use sometimes.

Made 48 muffins today !

curley 23.03.2020 16:18

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mrs. Doolittle (Post 3162462)
Have you ever walked by the bananas in the supermarket which are full of brown spots, possibly totally brown, with a reduced price and wondered what can you do with these? The answer is bake with them.

Ripe bananas are great to bake with. You can also mash them up and freeze them for later use.

I have no idea why there are very few baked goods with bananas in Switzerland. I have been making muffins for years. They are easy to make so your kids can help. I use a hand mixer but this is not esential. They freeze well (don't freeze them if the bananas were previously frozen).

The kids insisted I add chocolate chips. I also have mini muffin tins which I use sometimes.

Made 48 muffins today !

Absolutely - only last time I went shoping there were no bananas. :msncrazy:
I like to half them, then fry them in a little butter. They caramelize nicely. I could eat tons of that - also good with vanilla ice-cream.

spaghetti 23.03.2020 16:44

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Cakes also allowed in this post?

If yes there's something very time consuming but I've been wanting to try since forever:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCtYMS-vYvI

Russian honey cake!

I have a thing for layers, but not a big fan of the crepe cake texture, and difficult to make Baumkuchen at home.

Cherub 23.03.2020 16:58

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
I sometimes get a craving for toast and jam with sliced banana on top, read it's do do with low potassium levels.

terrifisch 23.03.2020 17:08

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Here's another easy, yummy recipe courtesy of the New York Times: ( I am copying as one needs a subscription to access it online).

Pork Chops With Dijon Sauce
JULIA REED

YIELD 4 servings
TIME 35 minutes

Pork Chops With Dijon Sauce

INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
4 1 1/4-inch-thick center-cut rib or loin pork chops, bone in
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup chopped green onions or shallots
½ cup dry white wine
¾ cup chicken or veal stock
½ cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard (or more to taste)
1 tablespoon chopped parsley (optional)

PREPARATION
Melt butter in the oil in a large deep skillet over high heat. Season chops with salt and pepper and add them, browning well, about 2 or 3 minutes a side, reducing the heat slightly if chops brown too quickly.
Remove chops to a platter and pour off most of the fat. Add green onions or shallots and cook over medium-high heat until softened, about 1 minute. Add wine and bring to a boil, scraping brown bits off the bottom. Stir in the stock and return chops to the pan. Bring the sauce to a simmer, cover and cook until chops are tender, about 15 to 20 minutes.
Remove the chops to a warm platter; cover with foil to keep warm. Raise the heat and boil pan juices to reduce by half, about 2 minutes. Add cream and boil 2 minutes more, until sauce reduces a bit and thickens. Remove from the heat and whisk in mustard and the parsley, if using. Taste and add more mustard if desired. Immediately spoon sauce over the chops and serve.

bowlie 23.03.2020 17:35

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Cherub (Post 3162454)
Last night we had spicy potato and leek.

How did you spice it? I’ve got a pot on the stove at the moment.

bowlie 23.03.2020 18:01

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by terrifisch (Post 3162525)
Here's another easy, yummy recipe courtesy of the New York Times: ( I am copying as one needs a subscription to access it online).

Pork Chops With Dijon Sauce
JULIA REED

YIELD 4 servings
TIME 35 minutes

Pork Chops With Dijon Sauce

INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
4 1 1/4-inch-thick center-cut rib or loin pork chops, bone in
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup chopped green onions or shallots
½ cup dry white wine
¾ cup chicken or veal stock
½ cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard (or more to taste)
1 tablespoon chopped parsley (optional)

PREPARATION
Melt butter in the oil in a large deep skillet over high heat. Season chops with salt and pepper and add them, browning well, about 2 or 3 minutes a side, reducing the heat slightly if chops brown too quickly.
Remove chops to a platter and pour off most of the fat. Add green onions or shallots and cook over medium-high heat until softened, about 1 minute. Add wine and bring to a boil, scraping brown bits off the bottom. Stir in the stock and return chops to the pan. Bring the sauce to a simmer, cover and cook until chops are tender, about 15 to 20 minutes.
Remove the chops to a warm platter; cover with foil to keep warm. Raise the heat and boil pan juices to reduce by half, about 2 minutes. Add cream and boil 2 minutes more, until sauce reduces a bit and thickens. Remove from the heat and whisk in mustard and the parsley, if using. Taste and add more mustard if desired. Immediately spoon sauce over the chops and serve.

My goodness. Are the yanks ever going to discover the metric system. Sounds good, but ...

terrifisch 23.03.2020 18:22

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bowlie (Post 3162567)
My goodness. Are the yanks ever going to discover the metric system. Sounds good, but ...

Haha! And I lived in London for over 10 years :D. I have this great measuring cup which has both the metric and US equivalents.

So here you go:

1/4 cup green onions/shallots is roughly 40 grams or so
1/2 cup wine/heavy cream is is about 120 ml
3/4 cup stock is 180 ml

Enjoy!!

Pancakes 23.03.2020 18:30

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by terrifisch (Post 3162216)
To be honest, I am the youngest of nine, and my Mom was all about expedience and getting "something" onto to the table which was somewhat edible. And yes, we ate a lot of "Hamburger Helper" and "Tuna Noodle Casserole" back in the day! Ughhh!

Thanks to my husband, we make a fresh, non-preservative filled dinner each night. :D. I am amazed how easy it is to cook from scratch versus buying prepared sauces at the store. And this, from a reluctant cook ...who may be changing her ways thanks to this quarantine/self isolation ...:D

It's funny you wrote that, because my mother also use to make a lot of Hamburger Helper and tuna noodle casserole. :p :msnsick: I remember once I left the house, I had no idea how to cook for myself. Then after moving here, and being forced to not rely on processed and pre-made foods as much as I was in the US, I began to learn new recipes (found online) and like you, I realized how nice it is to use more fresh ingredients. I love cooking now. :)

terrifisch 23.03.2020 18:47

Re: Recipes Worth a try
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pancakes (Post 3162587)
It's funny you wrote that, because my mother also use to make a lot of Hamburger Helper and tuna noodle casserole. :p :msnsick: I remember once I left the house, I had no idea how to cook for myself. Then after moving here, and being forced to not rely on processed and pre-made foods as much as I was in the US, I began to learn new recipes (found online) and like you, I realized how nice it is to use more fresh ingredients. I love cooking now. :)


I think it was that generation (and our large family did my Mom no favors in terms of meal preparation!). But everyone in the US was "sold" on ready made meals (filled with preservatives and garbage in the 70s and 80s).

This is gross and I shouldn't admit this but after my OH and I were first married, I was so hopeless in the kitchen that I used to serve Hormel chili from a can :msneek: over tortilla chips topped with cheddar cheese heated in a microwave. I cringe as I type this... I have come a long way but look at where I started. Ughh!


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