Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Food and drink  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 26.12.2020, 13:51
eyebeebe's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Pfäffikon SZ
Posts: 2,299
Groaned at 21 Times in 20 Posts
Thanked 3,106 Times in 1,311 Posts
eyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
I'm not the op but I would say almost certainly yes to all of your questions. This is handy for things like roast beef, i.e. that will cook evenly.

Turkeys (as well as other birds) are actually really, really difficult to cook well. The breast is prone to overcooking whilst the dark meat can still be underdone. I've driven myself nuts in the past trying to get it right. I believe the key is unstuffed, untied and on a tray with shallow sides in a hot oven for the first 30 mins or so, then a lower temperature for perhaps 1 hour depending on the size of the bird. Then what is crucial is a minimum of 1 hour resting time during which the cooking continues. I like to use a thermapen to probe the bird in various places.

Probing birds in various places is not necessarily strictly a Christmas activity
I find birds pretty straightforward. Turkey brined for 24 hours then smoked at 165 degrees with cherry wood until the breast hits 70 degrees. A bit of foil on the extremities if they are cooking too quickly.

I think the problem is people tend to cook to a time instead of to a temperature. Much better to use meat probes and take out the guess work.



Quote:
View Post
V-Zug of course.

I am sure though this functionality is quite standard everywhere now.
Yes our Miele one does it too with a wireless probe.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 26.12.2020, 13:52
komsomolez's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: SZ
Posts: 2,781
Groaned at 181 Times in 120 Posts
Thanked 5,163 Times in 2,079 Posts
komsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond reputekomsomolez has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

I hate carp.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank komsomolez for this useful post:
  #63  
Old 26.12.2020, 14:07
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Basel
Posts: 410
Groaned at 24 Times in 13 Posts
Thanked 661 Times in 265 Posts
Polymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
I find birds pretty straightforward. Turkey brined for 24 hours then smoked at 165 degrees with cherry wood until the breast hits 70 degrees. A bit of foil on the extremities if they are cooking too quickly.

I think the problem is people tend to cook to a time instead of to a temperature. Much better to use meat probes and take out the guess work.

That's an interesting method. This is a long way from traditional though. I myself would never brine the turkey as this is normally a process used by Americans for second-rate tasteless poultry. I procure a bird every year from France as they have the best poultry in the world - the best being Dinde de Bresse though I'm quite happy with any label rouge. To be frank, it would be criminal to brine such a bird, let alone smoke it! These are slow grown and have excellent flavour.

Fully agree with you that temperature is the way to go and I do enjoy smoking meat myself such as ribs and pork. However, I aim for a cooking temperature of around 110 C (225-ish F).
Reply With Quote
This user groans at Polymath for this post:
  #64  
Old 26.12.2020, 14:11
MusicChick's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 17,488
Groaned at 414 Times in 275 Posts
Thanked 20,428 Times in 10,577 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
I hate carp.
I only like them alive.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 26.12.2020, 14:34
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: CH
Posts: 120
Groaned at 6 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 72 Times in 42 Posts
intheblue has earned some respectintheblue has earned some respect
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
So since where I am from Xmas is 3 day affair, it is always an over-kill food wise. What is awesome this year is a fondue chinoise kit a kind EFer in Zurich pawned over to me 2 days ago. Fabulous! I haven't eaten so much meat in my entire life and Migros does really good pre-preped plates.

Now - for the bouillion. What can I do better next time. Any recipes, anyone?
If you go to the Carrefour in Divonne, the meat for fondue chinoise is much better.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 26.12.2020, 14:48
eyebeebe's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Pfäffikon SZ
Posts: 2,299
Groaned at 21 Times in 20 Posts
Thanked 3,106 Times in 1,311 Posts
eyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond reputeeyebeebe has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
That's an interesting method. This is a long way from traditional though. I myself would never brine the turkey as this is normally a process used by Americans for second-rate tasteless poultry. I procure a bird every year from France as they have the best poultry in the world - the best being Dinde de Bresse though I'm quite happy with any label rouge. To be frank, it would be criminal to brine such a bird, let alone smoke it! These are slow grown and have excellent flavour.

Fully agree with you that temperature is the way to go and I do enjoy smoking meat myself such as ribs and pork. However, I aim for a cooking temperature of around 110 C (225-ish F).
It isn‘t being brined for taste particularly. It‘s being brined to keep it moist and it certainly isn‘t criminal to add the light smokiness of cherry wood. I eat turkey breast several times a week, so don‘t want the traditional flavour.

It is consistently voted the best turkey our guests have ever eaten and has converted quite a few people who said they didn‘t like turkey.

There are different temperatures for smoking depending on what meat you are cooking and what you are trying to achieve. 110 is perfect for the meat you are suggesting, but poultry doesn‘t need the low and slow method to break down the fat and tough meat. 165 is is perfect for it and will also crisp up the skin beautifully.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank eyebeebe for this useful post:
  #67  
Old 26.12.2020, 15:39
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Basel
Posts: 410
Groaned at 24 Times in 13 Posts
Thanked 661 Times in 265 Posts
Polymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
It isn‘t being brined for taste particularly. It‘s being brined to keep it moist and it certainly isn‘t criminal to add the light smokiness of cherry wood. I eat turkey breast several times a week, so don‘t want the traditional flavour.

It is consistently voted the best turkey our guests have ever eaten and has converted quite a few people who said they didn‘t like turkey.

There are different temperatures for smoking depending on what meat you are cooking and what you are trying to achieve. 110 is perfect for the meat you are suggesting, but poultry doesn‘t need the low and slow method to break down the fat and tough meat. 165 is is perfect for it and will also crisp up the skin beautifully.
I also eat turkey breast all year round but it's not of the same quality as the turkey that I eat at Christmas (cannot be compared). It is specifically the top quality Christmas turkey that I believe is criminal to smoke. I was not implying that your cooking temp was wrong, 165 is indeed perfect for poultry and I very much enjoy bbq chicken legs done this way

In the end what's really important at Christmas is those that you share it with.
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 26.12.2020, 15:43
MusicChick's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 17,488
Groaned at 414 Times in 275 Posts
Thanked 20,428 Times in 10,577 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
If you go to the Carrefour in Divonne, the meat for fondue chinoise is much better.
I might have a look when the health situation is better in our area. So far, no cross border nuttin'.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 26.12.2020, 15:48
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 32,224
Groaned at 2,456 Times in 1,777 Posts
Thanked 39,327 Times in 18,536 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
It isn‘t being brined for taste particularly. It‘s being brined to keep it moist and it certainly isn‘t criminal to add the light smokiness of cherry wood.
I've only brined turkey once, not sure if it made a big difference (my turkeys are never dry)

Beef for corned beef is another matter.

Tom
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank st2lemans for this useful post:
  #70  
Old 26.12.2020, 15:53
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 32,224
Groaned at 2,456 Times in 1,777 Posts
Thanked 39,327 Times in 18,536 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
Turkeys (as well as other birds) are actually really, really difficult to cook well.
No, they are not.

Quote:
View Post
I believe the key is unstuffed, untied and on a tray with shallow sides in a hot oven for the first 30 mins or so, then a lower temperature for perhaps 1 hour depending on the size of the bird.
I always do stuffed, for 4-5 hours (up to 14 for a Turducken), been doing them since I was at university (cheap food that we all loved, we did one every month for me and my three housemates)

I normally do breast side down.

They get dry if unstuffed.

Tom
Reply With Quote
This user groans at st2lemans for this post:
  #71  
Old 26.12.2020, 16:16
Oldhand's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 4,015
Groaned at 18 Times in 17 Posts
Thanked 6,837 Times in 2,059 Posts
Oldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond reputeOldhand has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Growing up we alway’s had a Capon and a roast loin of pork. As much as I’d love to enjoy Turkey. I can’t.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 26.12.2020, 16:41
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Basel
Posts: 410
Groaned at 24 Times in 13 Posts
Thanked 661 Times in 265 Posts
Polymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
No, they are not.



I always do stuffed, for 4-5 hours (up to 14 for a Turducken), been doing them since I was at university (cheap food that we all loved, we did one every month for me and my three housemates)

I normally do breast side down.

They get dry if unstuffed.

Tom
We shall have to agree to disagree. My comment is based partly on my experience of eating turkeys cooked by other people (which were rarely any good) and also based on the opinions of top chefs as well as my own cooking experience (those that know me would consider me to be highly competent in the kitchen). You have lean breast and fatty dark meat, each with different cooking requirements. Therefore, difficult for most people.

As for stuffing birds breast side down, no arguments there, that's a favourite position of mine too
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Polymath for this useful post:
  #73  
Old 26.12.2020, 16:45
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 21,376
Groaned at 461 Times in 352 Posts
Thanked 23,091 Times in 11,824 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
We shall have to agree to disagree. My comment is based partly on my experience of eating turkeys cooked by other people (which were rarely any good) and also based on the opinions of top chefs as well as my own cooking experience (those that know me would consider me to be highly competent in the kitchen). You have lean breast and fatty dark meat, each with different cooking requirements. Therefore, difficult for most people.

As for stuffing birds breast side down, no arguments there, that's a favourite position of mine too
Generally people over cook meat, poultry, fish & vegetables.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank fatmanfilms for this useful post:
  #74  
Old 26.12.2020, 16:54
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Basel
Posts: 410
Groaned at 24 Times in 13 Posts
Thanked 661 Times in 265 Posts
Polymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
Generally people over cook meat, poultry, fish & vegetables.
So you are agreeing with me? This is why I added an extra 'really' in my original comment as most people can't cook to start with. Only I wasn't so bold to state it quite like you have.

That said, turkeys are not easy to cook for top chefs either. There are always compromises.
Reply With Quote
This user groans at Polymath for this post:
  #75  
Old 26.12.2020, 16:55
MusicChick's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: La Cote
Posts: 17,488
Groaned at 414 Times in 275 Posts
Thanked 20,428 Times in 10,577 Posts
MusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond reputeMusicChick has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
Generally people over cook meat, poultry, fish & vegetables.
And pasta.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank MusicChick for this useful post:
  #76  
Old 26.12.2020, 17:22
roegner's Avatar
Moderately Dutch
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,344
Groaned at 379 Times in 317 Posts
Thanked 14,602 Times in 6,751 Posts
roegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond reputeroegner has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
So you are agreeing with me? This is why I added an extra 'really' in my original comment as most people can't cook to start with. Only I wasn't so bold to state it quite like you have.
That is more than a bold statement, seeing that you probably do not know anyone here.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank roegner for this useful post:
  #77  
Old 26.12.2020, 17:25
BasP72's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Adliswil (close to Zurich)
Posts: 1,932
Groaned at 89 Times in 43 Posts
Thanked 1,785 Times in 852 Posts
BasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond reputeBasP72 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Homemade pizza yesterday, homemade lasagna just went in the oven for today
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 26.12.2020, 17:26
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 32,224
Groaned at 2,456 Times in 1,777 Posts
Thanked 39,327 Times in 18,536 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
As for stuffing birds breast side down, no arguments there, that's a favourite position of mine too
Keeps the breast moist, and not overcooked.

But I've been cooking turkeys since the late '70s, cheese fondue likewise!

Tom
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank st2lemans for this useful post:
  #79  
Old 26.12.2020, 17:31
countrybumpkin's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: France
Posts: 389
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 685 Times in 268 Posts
countrybumpkin has an excellent reputationcountrybumpkin has an excellent reputationcountrybumpkin has an excellent reputationcountrybumpkin has an excellent reputation
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Aperitif of Cremant de Bourgogne

Prawn cocktail on watercress.
Chablis 1er Crus Beauregard

Wild boar filet (shot within 3kms of the house)Wellington, roast potatoes and parsnips (homegrown). Carrots, sprouts and cabbage.
Gevrey-Chambertain 2014 followed by 2015 1er Crus.

Nothing else required.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 26.12.2020, 17:32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Basel
Posts: 410
Groaned at 24 Times in 13 Posts
Thanked 661 Times in 265 Posts
Polymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond reputePolymath has a reputation beyond repute
Re: So, what was for Chrismas Dinner?

Quote:
View Post
That is more than a bold statement, seeing that you probably do not know anyone here.
My comment has nothing to do with anyone here, it's a general statement based on the comment of fatmanfilms that generally people overcook all kinds of foods. Ipso facto most people don't know how to cook.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Polymath for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Your Chrismas present might cost you a fortune ... curley Other/general 1 19.12.2018 16:55
Bern Dinner Club - Dinner by the Aare at Restaurant Dampfzentrale - 12 June 2018 3Wishes Social events 2 11.06.2018 17:55
Bern Dinner Club, Wednesday 5th August, Indian dinner. Sbrinz Social events 4 03.08.2015 17:18
Dinner & Drinks: Basel Curry Dinner!!! JustRose Social events 23 05.12.2013 11:13
Dinner & Drinks: Basel Curry Dinner!!! JustRose Social events 9 21.09.2012 10:58


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 22:27.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0