Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Food and drink  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #2681  
Old 07.09.2016, 22:24
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Another recipe with a story! As peasant dishes go, this is probably the most infamous! Growing up, my grandma used to make this much to my utter disgust and annoyance! I used to absolutely hate this as a kid! Fast forward about 25 years, I came across it in Greece, two weeks ago! Handmade and authentic! So I brought it back and made it for the first time using my gran's recipe! And to my astonishment, I absolutely love it! I hope you're able to find it in Switzerland but I'm happy to help if you would really like to try it!

Trahanas in chicken broth with parsley and crumbled feta!

Trahanas comes by many names and is eaten in many countries, as highlighted on wiki!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarhana
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups trahana
  • 8 cups of water or vegetable or chicken stock
  • salt and pepper
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 6 tablespoons crumbled feta
  • greek yoghurt for garnish (optional)
  • chopped fresh herbs for garnish (dill, parsley or mint) - optional
  • In a medium soup pot heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat and add trahana. Stir until coated with oil, about 1 minute
  • Add water or stock and bring to a boil. Add salt and pepper to taste, reduce the heat and simmer, stirring often, until trahana is tender and nutty tasting and the broth slightly thickened, 15 to 20 minutes if using home-made bulgur trahana (if you use semolina or flour trahana the time will only be 8 to 12 minutes and the mixture will be more like a porridge).
  • Remove from heat and stir in lemon juice.

    Spoon into bowls and top with a drizzle of olive oil and a tablespoon of crumbled feta.

    Garnish with plain yogurt if desired and chopped fresh herbs such as mint, parsley or dill.
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14225612_10210563265428741_133579957912352228_n.jpg   post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14264163_10210563265748749_2979074876090558754_n.jpg  
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank acmilan for this useful post:
  #2682  
Old 12.09.2016, 09:25
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Zurich
Posts: 6
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 6 Times in 2 Posts
cvinzurich47 has no particular reputation at present
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

I love this thread!

Since moving to Zürich, I've been unemployed, however, it seems to have ignited my creativity and baking skills! I recently made a San Francisco-style sourdough loaf - the first loaf of bread I've baked in my life (besides banana bread). Tasted amazing and used entirely with wild yeast cultivated in my own kitchen. It only takes about a week to make a sourdough starter and if you have the patience, it's totally worth it.
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-img_20160827_085157917.jpg  
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank cvinzurich47 for this useful post:
  #2683  
Old 12.09.2016, 09:50
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 9,390
Groaned at 314 Times in 257 Posts
Thanked 13,423 Times in 6,970 Posts
greenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Trahanas in chicken broth with parsley and crumbled feta!

Trahanas comes by many names and is eaten in many countries, as highlighted on wiki!
I'd like to try this as I have the broth (home made), parsley and feta but never saw Trahanas here. Can I replace it with something else?
Reply With Quote
  #2684  
Old 12.09.2016, 09:56
gata's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Geneva
Posts: 3,857
Groaned at 67 Times in 48 Posts
Thanked 3,574 Times in 1,680 Posts
gata has a reputation beyond reputegata has a reputation beyond reputegata has a reputation beyond reputegata has a reputation beyond reputegata has a reputation beyond reputegata has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
I'd like to try this as I have the broth (home made), parsley and feta but never saw Trahanas here. Can I replace it with something else?
No you cant. Its totally unique.

How my mom used to do it, its just boil it in water until it reaches soup consistency, and add halloumi cubes.

The dried trahanas keeps forever. I still have some my grandmother made seven years ago. Not my favorite food to be honest but its great to nibble on when its dry
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank gata for this useful post:
  #2685  
Old 12.09.2016, 10:02
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
I'd like to try this as I have the broth (home made), parsley and feta but never saw Trahanas here. Can I replace it with something else?
Hello there,

I've brought quite a lot back from Greece. both the savoury and sweet variety. PM me your address and I will send some to you.

The closest thing is PASTINA. The tiny tiny pasta we use in soups.
Reply With Quote
  #2686  
Old 12.09.2016, 10:08
gaburko's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: BL
Posts: 825
Groaned at 129 Times in 86 Posts
Thanked 1,929 Times in 738 Posts
gaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond reputegaburko has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
I recently made a San Francisco-style sourdough loaf - the first loaf of bread I've baked in my life (besides banana bread). Tasted amazing and used entirely with wild yeast cultivated in my own kitchen.
Great first loaf, congrats and welcome to the world of sourdough baking What flour did you use?
Be careful now, taking care of your starter could become an obsession and my wife says I take care of it as if its a pet.
Next time, try ramping up the oven to its max temp and try baking like this, especially if you have a way to cover the bread for the first 20 min. in the oven to get max oven spring. Over the years we developed a taste for "darker" breads - ones that have achieved more maillard reaction on the crust and you get that with high temp.


Last edited by gaburko; 12.09.2016 at 10:21.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank gaburko for this useful post:
  #2687  
Old 18.09.2016, 18:15
luga's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: basel
Posts: 61
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 41 Times in 20 Posts
luga has earned some respectluga has earned some respect
Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Here I m again for some typical Chinese dish...

French bean or any long bean from supermarket

Get some of them (hand full) chop them in small pieces, and garlic

Heat the pan, put the oil, fried it up for 10-15 mins, put some salt, and then egg at the end

Nicely light lunch, you can serve with bread or go for rice

Hope you will try it....



Last edited by luga; 18.09.2016 at 18:26.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank luga for this useful post:
  #2688  
Old 18.09.2016, 18:22
luga's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: basel
Posts: 61
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 41 Times in 20 Posts
luga has earned some respectluga has earned some respect
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Ha Tks for moving my post to right place
Reply With Quote
  #2689  
Old 18.09.2016, 18:24
3Wishes's Avatar
Moderately Amused
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bern area
Posts: 10,599
Groaned at 77 Times in 74 Posts
Thanked 17,435 Times in 7,853 Posts
3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Bean n egg

Quote:
View Post
Here I m again for some typical Chinese dish...
Hi luga, welcome to our big foodie thread. In addition to sharing your own recipes, maybe you'll also find some you'd like to try.

I've never considered green beans with eggs, so now I have a new idea to try.
Reply With Quote
  #2690  
Old 18.09.2016, 18:25
luga's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: basel
Posts: 61
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 41 Times in 20 Posts
luga has earned some respectluga has earned some respect
Re: Bean n egg

Quote:
View Post
Hi luga, welcome to our big foodie thread. In addition to sharing your own recipes, maybe you'll also find some you'd like to try.



I've never considered green beans with eggs, so now I have a new idea to try.


Some people like to add a bit minced pork together, it give some nice texture
Reply With Quote
  #2691  
Old 20.09.2016, 00:12
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Monday night Focaccia!
  • 500 grams strong white bread flour
  • 7 grams of dried active yeast (pour it into 325ml of tepid / warm water (not
    hot) - give it a stir and allow it to rest for a few minutes)
  • tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil
  • pinch of salt



  • in a large bowl, add the pinch of salt to the flour and give it a good mix with a fork. then just drizzle in the olive oil and the yeast and warm water mixture.
  • continue to mix with a fork until it becomes difficult and then get your hands in there. combine well with hands and then pour the dough out onto your work surface with a good dusting of flour.
  • the dough will be sticky...this is normal. just add a little dusting of flour here and there. put the timer to 10 minutes...knead the dough for ten minutes really well. when well kneaded, the dough will be velvety and will spring back if you poke it.
  • dust the work surface with flour and place the dough on it. place the bowl you used over the dough and allow to prove for 40 minutes.
  • after 40 minutes, the dough will have doubled in size. you can stretch it, but DO NOT KNEAD OR FOLD. We want to trap that wonderful air in the dough. that's what will give the focaccia the crispyness at the top and the beautiful airy and spongey soft texture in the middle.
  • sprinkle some coarse polenta / semolina / breadcrumbs onto the baking tray. place the dough inside the baking tray and gently with hands just stretch it out so it fits to the tray.
  • pour about 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil onto the dough and massage it gently all over. then using the tips of all fingers, poke right down into the dough all over. as if you're basically trying to poke holes right through the dough but not quite. you will be left with lots of holes in the dough. this is when you can add your topping. here I have used chargrilled peppers, green onion, cubes of fontina cheese, oregano and thyme! You can add whatever you like, or you can just keep it plain.
  • once you've done your topping, place a damp towel over the focaccia and allow to prove for 45 minutes. basically it will again dough in size. 35 minutes in, preheat your oven to 200 degrees celcius.
  • after 45 minutes of proofing, season the top with some salt and pepper and place the focaccia into the oven and allow to bake for max 25 minutes. once golden on top, its ready!
  • When you take the focaccia out of the oven, it is important to remember that the focaccia is thirsty. its thirsty for olive oil. drizzle on a few tablespoons all over. this is really important. and then allow to rest for 10 minutes before cutting and serving. with this one, I also grated some pecorino on top.
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14359126_10210680834527895_4466412585344522172_n.jpg   post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14359214_10210680833847878_6144691761571492222_n.jpg  
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank acmilan for this useful post:
  #2692  
Old 23.09.2016, 23:39
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Bobo' de Galinha! Brazilian Cassava Curry with Chicken.


This dish is traditionally made with prawns. Make sure the prawns are shelled. Once you've prepared the sauce, just season the prawns with some salt and pepper and sear them in a frying pan for about 2 minutes prior to adding them to the sauce.

Chicken bobo:
  • 750 grams yuca / cassava
  • Chicken stock - enough chicken stock for the cassava to boil in
  • 2 green onions finely chopped
  • 1 red pepper finely chopped
  • 1 green pepper finely chopped
  • 5 cloves of garlic finely chopped
  • 250 ml coconut milk
  • palm oil or sunflower oil
  • good handful fresh coriander finely chopped
  • salt to taste
  • chilli flakes or 2 tablespoons of any hot sauce
  • 500 grams diced skinless chicken thighs (seasoned with salt and pepper and browned nicely and cooked through prior to adding to the bobo sauce)

Boil the cassava in the chicken stock with lid on for about 40 minutes.

Whilst the cassava is cooking, add 2-3 tablespoons of palm / sunflower oil to a frying pan on low to medium heat and add the onions. once the onions are a little soft, add the red and green peppers and once they're soft, add the garlic and sauté for a minute. take off the heat and set aside.

Once the cassava is cooked through in the stock, place the cassava into the food processor along with 2-3 ladles of the stock, the milk, 2-3 tablespoons of palm / sunflower oil and fresh coriander as well as the softened onions, peppers and garlic and blitz until well blended to a sauce. If the sauce is too thick, then add a little more of the stock.

Once the sauce is well blended, taste for salt and also add 1-2 tablespoons of hot sauce / chilli flakes. Blitz again until well blended. Make sure to taste for salt to your preference.

Pour the sauce into the pan that you browned your chicken in on low heat and then add your diced chicken to the sauce.

Served best with some basmati rice!
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14441015_10210720477718950_7841337542206447478_n.jpg   post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14433221_10210720478158961_1075237589333113500_n.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #2693  
Old 30.09.2016, 12:56
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

World's biggest coffee morning for MacMillan cancer support
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-f5a2ee97-e682-4a78-aa8e-f303211fccf1-large.jpg   post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14550816_10210785053013292_342328208_o.jpg   post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14522306_10210785052093269_290464939_o.jpg   post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14522224_10210785046213122_570693912_o.jpg  

Last edited by acmilan; 30.09.2016 at 15:27.
Reply With Quote
The following 5 users would like to thank acmilan for this useful post:
  #2694  
Old 02.10.2016, 19:38
TobiasM's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Zürich
Posts: 1,263
Groaned at 184 Times in 132 Posts
Thanked 2,765 Times in 1,280 Posts
TobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Thai beef salad (Yum Nua)

post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-yam-nua.jpg

Recipe this is made with taste not quantities:

Serves one or two people as a main four people as a starter or side.

Cherry Toms 8 to 12 cut in half.
A few salad leaves
Cucumber deseeded and chopped a quarter a cucumber
Shallot finely sliced length ways one or two
Spring onion sliced one or two
Fresh Coriander handful
Fresh Mint handful
Thai celery (I used Suppen Celery as its quite similar) a few sprigs and leaves
200 gm Fillet or sirloin or whatever cut of beef you like or Chicken, Salmon or Tofu.
Peanuts roasted and lightly crushed.

Dressing:
Lime juice app. 1
Fish sauce a good tbs. but taste as you go its really salty.
Palm sugar, white sugar if you don't have palm, about a tbs. by taste
Garlic sliced finely length wise app. 1
Birds Eye Chilli, as much as you like I used 3 for myself seeds in.

Marinade the beef if you like (not really necessary a bit of salt and pepper is fine rubbed with a splash of peanut oil) in a mix of teaspoon of sweet soy and a pinch of ground white pepper and salt rubbed in for a few hours.
Mix together the dressing, it should be sweet sour salty and sharp all at once (hard to explain unless you've eaten really good Thai Salads)
Put all the salad ingredients in a dish, pour over the dressing and sprinkle with peanuts.
BBQ or in a hot Griddle pan cook the Meat as you like it (I like rare beef its really best like that, too many Thai restaurants way overcook cheap beef in their Yum Nua).
Slice the beef or whatever you are using and lay it on top, and hey presto a like dat :-D

Last edited by TobiasM; 04.10.2016 at 21:31.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank TobiasM for this useful post:
  #2695  
Old 04.10.2016, 15:49
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Thai beef salad (Yum Nua)

Attachment 118733
recipe?
Reply With Quote
  #2696  
Old 07.10.2016, 09:38
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Penne al pistachio di bronte! Penne in pistacchio sauce!

I have posted this recipe before, but it is always nice making certain changes especially when cooking for different people. My dad is not a massive fan of raw garlic, so I decided to sauté the garlic in the butter and olive oil prior to sautéing the pistacchi.

recipe for two persons - because of the pistachio, this is quite a filling pasta so don't make too much. 200 gram of penne was enough for two.
  • 200 grams Penne
  • 3/4 cup pistacchio (Ideally Sicilian pistachio from bronte)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 clove of garlic chopped
  • 1 tablespoon of lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 cup of warm double cream
  • 1/2 cup of grated parmesan
  • 1 teaspoon of sea salt
  • Half a cup of the pasta cooking water
  • cracked black pepper (optional)

The sauce for this pasta has to be eaten immediately, as it will thicken the longer it sits
  • Have a pot of boiling salted water and all the penne to it.
  • If the pistacchi are salted then rinse the pistacchi with cold water and dry with kitchen towel in order to remove the excess salt.
  • In a frying pan, saute' the garlic with one tablespoon of butter and two tablespoons of olive oil on low heat. Once you can smell the aroma of the garlic and they've softened nicely, add the pistacchi and toast them nicely for a couple of minutes.
  • Transfer the mixture to a blender and blend until the its minced. Add the rest of the melted butter, lemon juice and salt and again pulse until well blended.
  • Add the mixture to a frying pan on LOW heat and then add the warmed cream and parmesan. Once the pasta is al dente, add it to the sauce and toss until all the pasta is well coated in the sauce.
  • Add about half a cup of the pasta cooking water to the sauce as it will help to loosen the sauce and make it less thick.
  • Serve immediately - some grated parmesan on top is optional or even a little cracked black pepper!
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14484711_10210851092824246_1732043541408565764_n.jpg  
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank acmilan for this useful post:
  #2697  
Old 07.10.2016, 23:24
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Dad went to a wedding in Calabria and brought me back arguably calabria's greatest creation....'NDUJA!!!! difficult to describe...its a salume that is spicy, smokey, full of spices and flavors...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%27Nduja

In addition to having numerous spreads of it on bread, I decided to make one of my absolute favourite pasta dishes. Traditionally, the pasta used is maccheroni al ferretto, but I couldn't find any in London. So I made it with casarecce instead.

Casarecce con ricotto e 'nduja. casarecce in ricotta and 'nduja sauce.

Portion for 2 people
  • 250 grams of casarecce(could also use any pasta of your choice)
  • 100 grams 'Nduja
  • 150 grams ricotta
  • half an onion chopped julienne
  • half a shallot chopped julienne
  • 40 grams grated parmesan
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • sea salt
  • Have a high sided frying pan on medium-low head. Add the olive oil and allow to get hot. Then add the onions and shallots and allow them to gently simmer.
  • Remove the outer guy of the 'nduja (like the outer lining of a sausage) and cut into small squares.
  • When the onions and shallots have nicely softened, add the 'nduja and stir so that the 'nduja breaks down and blends into the onions.
  • In the meantime, add the salt to boiling water and then add the casarecce! You'll need to cook them until al-dente
  • Add the ricotta to a bowl and mix the parmesan into it. then take the 'nduja sauce off the heat and pour it into the bowl with the ricotta and parmesan and mix well so they're fully incorporated. Pour the whole mixture back into the frying pan on medium to low heat. Add a ladle of the pasta cooking water as it will help to make the 'sauce' a little less thick.
  • Once the pasta is al-dente, drain and add it to the 'nduja sauce and mix gently. Then serve.
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14606521_10210854946440584_1722856264382852083_n.jpg   post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-14462923_10210854946920596_1053327842803006618_n.jpg  

Last edited by 3Wishes; 07.10.2016 at 23:42. Reason: replaced link in Italian with link in English. :)
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank acmilan for this useful post:
  #2698  
Old 10.10.2016, 09:08
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 28,976
Groaned at 1,989 Times in 1,506 Posts
Thanked 34,407 Times in 16,366 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

I love 'Nduja, but how did you manage to slice it, put it in the freezer for a bit?

Tom
Reply With Quote
  #2699  
Old 10.10.2016, 09:40
acmilan's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Donato Milanese
Posts: 612
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 805 Times in 350 Posts
acmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond reputeacmilan has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
I love 'Nduja, but how did you manage to slice it, put it in the freezer for a bit?

Tom
Would I be right in saying that you ask that because you've only seen 'Nduja in a 'paste' consistency in a jar? 'Nduja looks like a big chunky sausage. like a sausage, it has a casing that holds it together. This is what a typical 'Nduja looks like prior to slicing.
Attached Thumbnails
post-photos-what-you-cook-bake-switzerland-447165262a6a0043aa06b86904b37617_l.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #2700  
Old 10.10.2016, 09:58
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 28,976
Groaned at 1,989 Times in 1,506 Posts
Thanked 34,407 Times in 16,366 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Would I be right in saying that you ask that because you've only seen 'Nduja in a 'paste' consistency in a jar? 'Nduja looks like a big chunky sausage. like a sausage, it has a casing that holds it together. This is what a typical 'Nduja looks like prior to slicing.
Nope, I only know it as a very soft sausage, never seen it in a jar.

Like this: http://blog.giallozafferano.it/shakr...1/IMG_1294.jpg

It would be very hard to slice.

Tom

Last edited by 3Wishes; 10.10.2016 at 12:03. Reason: I know you like to make an impression but the photo was too big. Now a link.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
baked yummies, baking, cake, cakes, drool, food photos, food pictures, muffins, sweet stuff




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (0 members and 2 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Post Your Photos From Switzerland! ManBearPig Daily life 1577 06.05.2020 19:32
BCT Flea Market & Bake Sale wattsli1 Commercial events 0 18.09.2009 10:42
Urgent post Switzerland to UK - advice? fargone Other/general 12 02.07.2007 19:25
Washington Post story about gun control in Switzerland Bartholemew Swiss politics/news 39 23.05.2007 13:24


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:05.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0