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  #2921  
Old 19.03.2017, 02:09
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Sarma! Croatian style! pork cabbage rolls!
Sorry, the sarma is an almost religious thing on the balkans and there's no sarma without sour cabbage (sauerkraut)
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  #2922  
Old 19.03.2017, 11:49
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Sorry, the sarma is an almost religious thing on the balkans and there's no sarma without sour cabbage (sauerkraut)
Speaking of which, you should be fasting this time of the year, don't you? I'm kidding.


I prefer "sarma" made of turkey meat tbh, or "vegetarian sarma".
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  #2923  
Old 19.03.2017, 14:29
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Sorry, the sarma is an almost religious thing on the balkans and there's no sarma without sour cabbage (sauerkraut)
Unfortunately, I don't know much about Balkan food. The way I make it is mainly with Dalmatian / Istrian influences and also Greek.
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  #2924  
Old 19.03.2017, 14:58
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Speaking of which, you should be fasting this time of the year, don't you? I'm kidding.
Yes, but I always fast by consuming only grass-fed food anyway

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Unfortunately, I don't know much about Balkan food. The way I make it is mainly with Dalmatian / Istrian influences and also Greek.
As much as the Greeks don't like it, the fact is that the whole area was part of the same (Ottoman) empire for quite a while which blended the regional cuisines centuries ago. "Greek" food is a meaningless term, it just happens that that the Greeks were better at marketing.
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  #2925  
Old 19.03.2017, 19:36
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Husband's birthday dessert today. Chocolate "Salami" and choc covered strawberries. :-)

Last edited by edot; 27.08.2017 at 20:12.
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  #2926  
Old 20.03.2017, 08:17
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Yes, but I always fast by consuming only grass-fed food anyway
.
Lol, that's a good one, I'll keep it in mind.

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As much as the Greeks don't like it, the fact is that the whole area was part of the same (Ottoman) empire for quite a while which blended the regional cuisines centuries ago. "Greek" food is a meaningless term, it just happens that that the Greeks were better at marketing.
You're right, and funnily enough everybody thinks it's their national dish...:ROFL:. I am looking forward to eating lamb meatloaf (it's called drob back home), yummy. So moist, with lots of dill and parsley, and such an intense taste.
Something like this


I'm afraid I'll never find the ingredients in this snobbish place. I guess the Swiss throw them away -the lamb organs.

Last edited by greenmount; 20.03.2017 at 09:23.
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  #2927  
Old 20.03.2017, 09:19
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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You're right, and funnily enough everybody thinks it's their national dish...:ROFL:. I am looking forward to eating lamb meatloaf (it's called drob back home), yummy. So moist, with lots of dill and parsley, and such an intense taste.
Yes, we have it as well and I love it too! In fact, we call it drob as well, but in our case "drob" means liver and we cover it like a moussaka (not my photo).
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Old 21.03.2017, 22:47
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Next in the shortbread diaries! Chocolate dipped
hazelnut shortbread!

For shortbread:
  • 200 grams unsalted butter - softened at room temp
  • 60 grams powder sugar
  • 280 grams all purpose or 00 flour
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of salt
  • 80 grams crushed hazelnuts or any nuts of your liking

Pre-heat oven to 180 degrees Celsius
  • To a large bowl, add the softened butter, powder sugar, salt and vanilla. Bring the whole mixture together with a wooden spoon until you have a well incorporated smooth velvety paste.
  • Pour in the flour and mix the flour in gently with a wooden spoon until you have the cookie dough. Pour in the crushed hazelnuts and using your hands, mix them nicely into the dough
  • bring the whole dough together to a big ball and then divide into two. You then want roll out the dough in the shape of a salame / sausage. Then using a knife, cut 1cm thick pieces. Place each on the baking tray lined with parchment paper.
  • Place into the oven and bake for 15-17 minutes.
  • Take out of the oven and allow to cool completely.
  • Place 100 grams of dark or semi sweet chocolate broken up into small pieces with hands into a cup and microwave it on the lowest setting for 20 second intervals until the chocolate has melted. Give it a mix and when it has fully melted, pour in half a teaspoon of vegetable oil as this will give the melted chocolate a glossy shine. Give it a mix so its well incorporated into the chocolate.
  • Take each cookie and dip one side into the chocolate (you can coat as little of the cookie or as much as you like) and then place on baking parchment. Allow all the chocolate to temper on the cookies at room temp (this will allow it to stay glossy) before putting them in the fridge.
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  #2929  
Old 22.03.2017, 15:11
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Sarma! Croatian style! pork cabbage rolls!
  • 450 grams lamb or pork mince
  • 1 cup rice
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne
  • pinch dried oregano
  • 1/4 cup packed Italian parsley
  • 1 tbsp dried currants
  • 2 tbsp sliced almonds
  • 1 cup tomato puree
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken broth
  • 1/2 onion sliced
  • 1 head of cabbage
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • feta and parsley to garnish, optional
  • Small pieces of pork belly / loin (optional)
I have a silly question here - should the rice be cooked or uncooked when we mix it into the cooked meat? Never made cabbage rolls before but I love them and would like to try this!
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  #2930  
Old 22.03.2017, 15:25
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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I have a silly question here - should the rice be cooked or uncooked when we mix it into the cooked meat? Never made cabbage rolls before but I love them and would like to try this!
they're not cooked. they'll cook through during the cooking process the meat mince isn't cooked either. it cooks during the cooking process.

in a bowl, add the ground lamb. then add the rice, generous with salt, the dried parsley, almond flakes, dried currants and then the onion and garlic mixture. mix in well with a spatula. then over with cling film and place in the fridge until needed
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  #2931  
Old 25.03.2017, 15:33
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Fasolada, Fasolia, Lubia...call it what you like! The ultimate bean stew!

  • 500 grams medium sized white beans
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 celery stalks chopped roughly
  • 3 carrots chopped roughly with skin on
  • 1 large red onion roughly chopped
  • 5 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon tomato puree
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 rosemary sprigs
  • 1 vegetable stock cube
  • 1 whole red apple with skin on
  • 2 litres of water

Fasolada to be served with

- chilli flakes
- salt
- pepper
- olive oil
- feta cheese
- mixed whole olives
- fresh thyme

Place the beans in a bowl and fill with enough water to cover the beans

Add the teaspoon of salt, give it a mix and then allow the beans to soak for 8-12 hours

After the beans have soaked, drain, rinse the beans well with cold water, drain and set aside

Placed a high sided pot / dutch oven on medium heat and immediately add the olive oil, carrots, celery, onions and garlic.

Saute for a good 15-20 minutes on medium to low heat until the vegetables have lightly softened. stir occasionally

When the vegetables have softened, add the tomato puree, stir the puree well into the vegetables and saute for about 1 minute.

Add the beans, bay leaves, rosemary, stock cube and whole apple and the water. The apple is added whole to thicken the soup and also to add natural sweetness. It will be removed once the fasolada is done.

Bring the fasolada to a boil and then reduce the head to medium low and allow to simmer for 1.5 hours.

Check on the fasolada from time to time in the case that it might need a little more water.

If do require to add more water, make sure the water is boiling prior to adding so that you don't slow down the cooking process.

10 minutes before the soup is done, remove the apple, check for salt and pepper, place the lid back on and allow to cook for the final ten minutes.

To serve, place the fasolada in a bowl and lightly garnish with some chilli flakes and a little drizzle of olive oil

Serve alongside some feta and mixed olives with a drizzle of olive oil and garnished with fresh thyme. Some bread would be nice as well. Or you can serve it simply with rice.
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  #2932  
Old 27.03.2017, 21:54
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Whole wheat spelt flour mix cinnamon rolls!
  • 185 ml unsweetened almond milk
  • 7 grams active dried yeast
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed
  • 1 tablespoons coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing
  • 150 grams wholegrain flour
  • 150 grams white flour / 00 flour

For filling:
  • 90 grams pecan nuts
  • 2 ripe bananas
  • 4 medjool dates
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup

Almond icing
  • 1-2 tablespoons almond milk
  • 75 grams icing sugar


To make the dough, gently heat the almond milk in a saucepan until its lukewarm, then combine in a small bowl with the yeast and maple syrup. Set aside for around 5 minutes for the yeast to activate

In a large bowl, mix the flaxseed into 3 tablespoons of water and set aside for 1 minute

Melt the coconut oil, add it to the flaxseed mixture along with the flours, cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Gradually stir in the yeast mixture.

Bring the whole dough together with your hands. The dough will feel a bit tacky, but this is OK. Pour out onto a lightly floured surface and knead a few times.

Place the dough into a well greased bowl, cover with a towel and leave it somewhere warm to proof for around 1 hour or until the dough has doubled in size.

Meanwhile, make the filling. toast the pecans in a pan, peel the bananas and destone the dates.

Reserving 1/3 of the pecans, add the pecans, bananas and dates to a food processor and blitz until you have a smooth paste.

Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius. Grease a 20cm x 20cm baking dish with the coconut oil.

Roll the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and using a rolling pin, roll out to 20cm x 40cm. Put the nut, banana and date paste onto the rolled out dough and spread it evenly to the edges.

roll it up widthways from the shortest edge tightly into a log and cut into 9 even slices.

Place the slices side by side into the baking dish, cover with a tea towel and allow to proof for another 25 minutes or until doubled in size.

Bake for 30 minutes or until golden and firm to touch. Take out of the oven and leave to completely cool in the tin.

In a small bowl, mix together the icing sugar and the almond milk until you have the icing and drizzle it over the cinnamon buns. you can also crush the set aside pecans and just sprinkle it over the buns for extra richness.
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Last edited by acmilan; 27.03.2017 at 22:48.
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  #2933  
Old 28.03.2017, 23:15
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Saragli Thessaloniki! Baklava Salonika style!

Please note that this is a very rich dish! It is something that you maybe make once a year (go for a 10KM run the next day), but if you're going to make it, you have to make it right!


For the syrup
  • 500 grams caster sugar
  • 300 grams water
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 50 grams glucose or honey
  • 6 whole cloves
  • peels of one lemon
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

For the saragli
  • 400 grams unsalted butter
  • 100 grams walnuts or pecans
  • 100 grams almonds
  • 100 grams pistachi
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon clove
  • 20 filo pastry sheets

To a large saucepan, add the sugar, water, cinnamon stick, glucose, cloves and peel of lemon. Place the pan on medium heat and and allow it boil for between 5-7 minutes or until the liquid is clear and the sugar has dissolved.

Take off the heat, stir in the tablespoon of lemon juice and allow to cool at room temp

Pre-heat oven to 160 degrees Celsius

Add the butter to a saucepan and completely melt the butter on low heat.

To a blender / food processor, add the walnuts, almonds, pistachi and clove. You want to blitz it well so that you don't have last chunks. but at the same time, make sure it doesn't turn into powder. You just don't want to have very large pieces as it will break the filo when rolled. Then place the mixture into a bowl. Place the melted butter into a separate bowl.

Roll out one thin sheet of the filo on the work surface and lightly drizzle it with the melted butter all over. you can do this with a pastry brush.

Place another thin sheet of filo right on top of the filo sheet and again drizzle generously with butter.

Sprinkle with the nut mixture all over, being careful you're not too generous.

Put two sticks across the middle and you want to fold the filo, leaving a gap of two fingers towards the edge.

Start rolling the filo from your end but being careful not to do it too tightly, until you get to the end and you end up with a sausage shape.

Then you want to basically crunch up the saragli by pushing gently from both ends in order to achieve that authentic crinkly shape. Pull out the wooden sticks and place the saragli onto a baking pan that has been greased with butter all over. You want to brush the saragli well with butter once you've put it in the pan. this will stop it from drying out. Repeat the process until you've got the pan full with saragli.

If you have any leftover butter, pour it evenly over all of the saragli. This is a rich dish because of the butter but if you are going to make it, then might as well make it as it should be.

Place into the oven and bake between 70 and 90 minutes or until golden.

Take out of the oven and immediately pour the cold syrup over the saragli

Allow the saragli to sit at room temp for minimum 40 minutes in order to soak up the syrup

Sprinkle with some roughly broken up pistachi (optional) and serve.
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  #2934  
Old 07.04.2017, 03:19
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

A savoury take on easter colomba! Colomba salata with guanciale, provolone picante and rosemary!
  • 250 grams strong bread flour
  • 350 grams 00 flour
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 250 ml lukewarm full fat milk
  • 100 grams unsalted butter - very soft at room temp
  • 30 grams caster / granulated sugar
  • 7 grams active dried yeast
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 100 grams cubed pancetta (cooked and cooled)/ ham cubes / turkey slices cut into cubes or any salame' cut into cubes of your liking
  • 100 grams of cubed fontina, scamorza, provolone or even pizza mozzarella

In a saucepan, heat up the milk until its lukewarm. Add 100ml of the milk to a cup or a small bowl and stir in the sugar and yeast. Then set it aside for 5 minutes for the yeast to activate

To a large bowl, add the flour and mix in the salt.

Make a little well in the middle of the flour mix and pour in the milk and yeast mixture and begin to mix with your hands or with a fork until it has combined.

Beat the eggs and again add it to the dough and mix it in ideally with your hands.

Then little by little, add add milk to the dough until the dough comes together. You might not need to add the whole 150ml of milk. You just want to add enough until the dough has come together, its sticky to the touch and is homogeneous.

Knead in the dough in the bowl by turning it over and over for about 10 minutes and then add the softened butter. Work the butter nicely into the dough until the dough is homogeneous

Pour the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for between 5 and 10 minutes or until the dough is smooth and tenderly bounced back when poked. Then form the dough into a bowl, place in a well greased bowl with olive oil, You want to cover the bowl tightly with cling film. You could also place the dough into a container that closes. Place a towel over the bowl / container and leave the dough the proof for 2 hours.

For the filling:

If you're using pancetta, then make sure to crisp the pancetta in a frying pan and then allow to completely cool. Discard the fat that has come out of the pancetta. If using already cooked / cured salame, just cut them into little cubes so they blend

Cut the cheese of your choice into little cubes

Once the dough has proofed for two hours and has doubled in size, take it out of the bowl and place is on a lightly floured surface. You want to gently flattend the dough out to create surface area for the cheese and salame. Add both the cheese and salame' into the centre of the flattened dough and then gently mix the dough back into a ball.

Then using both hands, roll the dough out into the shape of a big sausage / salame to about 30-35cm in length. Cut about 10cm of each side of the dough.

Place the big piece of dough into the colomba baking paper or a baking tray lined with baking parchment. Lay each piece of the leftover dough on each side of the big piece of dough to effectively create what looks like a 'cross' - it is supposed to look like a dove.

Cover the dough with a damp towel and allow to rise for 3 hours.

15 minutes before the three hours are up, pre-heat oven to 180 degrees Celsius.

Once the dough has proofed for 3 hours, as an option you can poke in 2-4 black / green olives into the dough at each end.

Place the dough into the centre of the oven and allow to bake for 40 minutes.

Take out of the oven and allow to cool for 10-15 minutes prior to slicing.
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  #2935  
Old 07.04.2017, 07:47
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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A savoury take on easter colomba! Colomba salata with guanciale, provolone picante and rosemary!
  • 100 grams cubed pancetta
  • 100 grams of cubed fontina, scamorza, provolone or even pizza mozzarella
Somebody didn't check the recipe!

Even so, now I have to buy a colomba form, will try to remember when we go to Italy on Sunday!

Tom
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  #2936  
Old 07.04.2017, 09:26
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

[QUOTE=st2lemans;2768891]Somebody didn't check the recipe!

Sorry, I don't know what you mean?
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  #2937  
Old 07.04.2017, 09:57
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

The title doesn't correspond to the ingredients.

Tom
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  #2938  
Old 07.04.2017, 10:02
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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The title doesn't correspond to the ingredients.

Tom
Ah! If I use guanciale in a particular dish (this, amatriciana or gricia), I usually put pancetta as most people unless in Italy or have access to a good deli might struggle to get hold of guanciale! I used provolone picante, but you can use any type of cheese really!

the two additional ones I will make today will have olives, sundries tomatoes and onions!

Aw and there's a website in the UK selling colomba moulds, in case you forget when in Italy! They're called bakery bits! They ship all over the world!

http://www.bakerybits.co.uk
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  #2939  
Old 09.04.2017, 09:45
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Hot cross buns, straight out of the oven. There were 6
Made with sourdough so they take time!! Taste lovely though
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Hot Cross Buns



Makes 6 buns

FOR THE LEAVEN
20g refreshed starter
90g cold water
90g organic wholemeal flour

FOR THE DOUGH
225g milk
50g butter
300g strong white flour
100g wholemeal flour
1 egg at room temperature
4g sea salt mixed with 10g of water
200g dried blueberries
zest of 1 lime
1 tbsp toasted anise seeds

FOR THE CROSS MIX
10g starter
30g cold water
50g strong white organic flour

FOR THE SUGAR GLAZE (optional)
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp warm water


Method

Late evening (ideally 11pm)

Mix the leaven ingredients then leave covered with a damp cloth on the counter for 6Ė8 hours. It should then be bubbly and ready to use.

Mix Early morning (ideally about 7am)

In a large bowl, whisk your water and starter together then add the flour. Mix until all the flour has made contact with the water and there is no more dry flour.

1st Ferment:

Warm the milk and the butter, in a saucepan until the butter melts. Leave to cool to 30C then beat in the egg. Pour this liquid into the bowl of dry ingredients.

Cover the bowl with a clean damp cloth and leave the dough to rest on the side in the kitchen for 30 minutes. This is called Autolyse. Then add the saline water. Donít worry if it looks wet, the flour will absorb it as you stretch and fold.

Fold

Lift and fold your dough over on itself. Do a quarter turn of your bowl and repeat three more times. Over the next 2.5 hours, using lightly wet hands, lift, and fold your dough every 30 minutes. Becoming ever more gently with your folds. This process gives you the chance to feel the dough and get a sense of how it is behaving. On the last stretch and fold add the blueberries and lime zest and scatter the toasted anise seeds.

Shape

Place the dough onto a lightly floured surface and divide into 6. Dust very lightly with flour and shape into balls. Transfer onto either greaseproof paper with a sprinkling of semolina or a buttered baking tray that has been lightly dusted with flour. Cover with a damp tea towel and leave to prove for another hour then transfer into the fridge until you are ready to bake the following day.

Next day:

Make the cross mixture

About 4 hours before you want to bake, stir together the cross mixture ingredients. Leave covered with a damp cloth on the counter for 4 hours.

When ready to bake stir in 1 tablespoon of caster sugar and add more water until it is viscous enough to pipe easily but not run.

Bake

Preheat the oven to gas mark 7/220C/425F. Take the dough from the fridge.

Transfer the fermented paste into a piping bag. Bake the buns in a cloche for 15-20 minutes. The covered baking ensures that maximum rise for the buns as they are steamed, so the crust strays soft as the dough has its initial rise. Uncover and make the cross on the top of each one using the piping bag. This way the cross stands slightly proud. Bake for a further 10 minutes until lightly golden (with the lid on to maintain softness). When the hot cross buns come out of the oven, mix the honey and water together for the glaze, and brush each hot bun. Pop back in the oven for 2 minutes (again with the lid on).


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baked yummies, baking, cake, cakes, drool, food photos, food pictures, muffins, sweet stuff




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