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  #41  
Old 22.05.2011, 18:00
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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By the way, we could make a advisory list of names pronouncible and non-offensive in the whole world by sharing our language and cultural knowledge. So far, I only have one name in that world-ideal-names: Hugo. (But I am still researching asian languages, there may be one where hu-go means something dirty...)
Haha! I have yet to come across a dirty meaning for my name but remain ever hopeful.
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  #42  
Old 22.05.2011, 18:15
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

One of my daughters is named after a song by the Ramones, the other after a character in a book by Margaret Mitchell.

Tom
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  #43  
Old 22.05.2011, 18:22
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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Angelina, Tiffany, Amber, Verdana, Yannik-Noël, Rex, Annabella-Stefania, Dorkas
All seem perfectly decent names to me. I was at school with a chap whose Christian names were Toby Felix. No-one bothered him over his name.

I'd like to know why Theresa married a Mr Green. And I did work with a guy from the subcontinent called Kowshit. He changed it to Kowshik quite quickly.
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  #44  
Old 22.05.2011, 18:29
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

I see the point as increasing mobility and multi-cultural societies will face us with such situations. Same thing applies actually also to brand naming.
For example the Renault Koleos sounds good for a car until you discover that Koleos means "balls" in greek. Or the infamous Toyota MR2 which sounds like "shitty" in french.
Marketing people spend time now checking meaning and pronounciation in different cultures. I'd see the same for kid names.
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  #45  
Old 22.05.2011, 18:41
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

Well in Kittister's defense.... there have been some very serious studies regarding people's place in society based on their name.
It seems that people with serious classical names have a much better chance to end up in high-level positions
There seems to be lots of bankers, lawyers, economists called Charles for instance.

So can a first name stigmatize you ?
....with the obvious exception of Barack
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  #46  
Old 22.05.2011, 18:51
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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My point is that names matter - more often than not you will hear people say "well, what do you expect from someone called *some name*".
And who has the problem here exactly, the person with "some name" or the bigoted person who thinks it's OK to judge them for their name alone?


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Let's just say that the Zürichdeutsch pronounciation is a bit offensive to the ears.
So your problem really is the Zurichdeutsch language.

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And names do matter, various studies have been done about this. Of course you can go and call people who pay attention to this petty, but the problem is that most people do without knowing they are doing it. Isn't it better to acknowledge that prejudice will occur if you choose to call your baby Shanique and not do it rather than have her spend the rest of her life fighting that prejudice? There are problems enough in this world.
The only problem with the names you listed above are the way Swiss Germans pronounce them. I really though this conversation was going to be about silly names like Harry Pitts or Stan Still or Diva Thin Muffin Pigeen.


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Lukas is a very usual name in Cyprus. The accent (is that what you call it) though is on the a so its pronounced loukAs
In Portugal as well the name is Lucas, with the 's'.

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All seem perfectly decent names to me.
Me too.


As Angela says double names are common in quite a few countries, including France and Italy (oh & Swiss Romande & Ticino).

I have a pompous double name too. But I won't force you call me by it. I hope you'll let my family use it though and not consider them too beneath you.
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  #47  
Old 22.05.2011, 18:53
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

I refused to name my son "Todd". It just leaves too many implications open.

Imagine Todd Vogel or Todd Fischer or Todd Mann.
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  #48  
Old 22.05.2011, 19:20
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

Jeez, this is not a Friday crowd. Double names are fine, it's just that certain combinations don't exactly complement each other. And my point is that parents who have no connection to a culture other than having heard the name in a film choose to name their kids after the film character. Amber IS a perfectly fine name, for someone who actually knows what it means and can pronounce it. This is NOT the case with the parents I'm talking about, they call their little girl "Hanee" after that Jessica Alba dance film and don't realise they've named their kid after bee produce. That's why I wrote "special" and not special. But I see we're in a super-enlightened mood today where parents are holy creatures without fault that are allowed to do with their property children whatever they please, no matter how it may be detrimental to them, right?
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  #49  
Old 22.05.2011, 19:59
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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Jeez, this is not a Friday crowd. Double names are fine, it's just that certain combinations don't exactly complement each other. And my point is that parents who have no connection to a culture other than having heard the name in a film choose to name their kids after the film character. Amber IS a perfectly fine name, for someone who actually knows what it means and can pronounce it. This is NOT the case with the parents I'm talking about, they call their little girl "Hanee" after that Jessica Alba dance film and don't realise they've named their kid after bee produce. That's why I wrote "special" and not special. But I see we're in a super-enlightened mood today where parents are holy creatures without fault that are allowed to do with their property children whatever they please, no matter how it may be detrimental to them, right?
Who cares why the parents choose the name of the child? Why are you the one that gets to decide if the double barrel names complement each other or not? None of the names you have written do I see as problematic.

Including Hanee which is not a bad name either. Does it matter if it comes from "a bee product"? Amber might "mean" something, but really, it's just a name. No one associates the thing that is amber, lily, rose, etc with the person called Amber, Lily, Rose, June, April, etc.

Names change over time as do languages and cultures. Where people get names also changes. Before it was movie stars or names from Jane Austin novels, or the bible, or whatever.

I grew up with a double barreled "foreign name". I also have a friend who's mother made up her name out of nothing. Yes we had to spell it more often than we would have liked. Shockingly neither of us is living in the gutter on hand outs.

Your snide remarks at the end don't endear you to anyone & don't make your case stronger either. The fact that you don't like the names chosen does not make them bad parents who treat there children like "property". (BTW I'm not a parent.)

No offense, but perhaps it's you this is being overly judgmental.
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  #50  
Old 22.05.2011, 20:47
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

funny post, see the different level of thinking of human
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  #51  
Old 22.05.2011, 20:53
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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funny post, see the different level of thinking of human
Looking forward to seeing what you have to sell
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  #52  
Old 22.05.2011, 21:01
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

Or parents could have just been lazy and plugged through this website for inspiration as wifey went into labour...
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  #53  
Old 22.05.2011, 21:17
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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  #54  
Old 22.05.2011, 21:19
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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I think you are judgemental and should be a bit more respectful of other people's culture (Aylin) or personal taste on how to name their kids.

Having a middle name has nothing pompous and who cares if someone wants to call his child with 7 middle names? None of my business or yours.

According to you, parents should be careful to not take a name that is english if they are not english, should not take a name who sounds too difficult to pronounce for you, no double name because it is pompous, etc...

Should we all, daft parents call you before to name our kids to be sure you approve?

You can have different taste and not like a name but to judge parents and call them names is lame.
i will call my boy Hänsel and girl Gertrude.
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  #55  
Old 22.05.2011, 21:22
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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Diva Thin Muffin Pigeen.
What's wrong with Diva Thin Muffin Pigeen?

Actually, I quite like Äämbr. Maybe also Äurörä
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  #56  
Old 22.05.2011, 21:24
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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  #57  
Old 22.05.2011, 21:38
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

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(snip)
You are right Diva Thin Muffin Pigeen is not so bad really & Bobby Tables is sorta cute. But that's because I'm super-enlightened and think parents are holy creatures without fault and that children are property.

Aurore however is unpronounceable to anyone that isn't mother tongue French. I keep telling my French friend she MUST change her name. But she does not listen to me. The b*tch!
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  #58  
Old 22.05.2011, 21:53
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

So where do you draw the line? Maybe it's a culture thing (probably, as I find people in my German speaking group of friends DO react strongly to names), I remember in England I could call myself whatever I wanted on the school files and did hide my German-sounding surname for about a year because there was the whole debate with the Nazi gold going on at the time. And even in England I noticed that none of the Aristokids I went to uni with were called Kevin, Wayne or Barry, so there must be some class divide in names even there.
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  #59  
Old 22.05.2011, 22:10
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

There is a class divide but you can't jump out of it by calling your child a noble name. My name is very common in England for my age group, I still enjoy telling people it's meaning and I think it quite suits me. Old English for waterfall or water way. I don't think for a minute that me mum knew that, when she had me christened.
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  #60  
Old 22.05.2011, 22:17
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Re: Parents that give kids "special" names...

Spent childhood with the very proper double name that would have fit a lady and not a tomboy who liked to bring worms home as pets from the playground. It was terrible ! Now I could use it but I still only use the abbreviation.
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