Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Off-Topic > Off-Topic > General off-topic  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08.06.2011, 18:32
stephanienie's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: aargau
Posts: 473
Groaned at 4 Times in 4 Posts
Thanked 283 Times in 144 Posts
stephanienie has an excellent reputationstephanienie has an excellent reputationstephanienie has an excellent reputationstephanienie has an excellent reputation
"shake it like a british nanny"

Any thoughts on this phrase? Ive witnessed a midwife from the UK who was spanking instead of just tapping the back of an infant to burp him. And then when the infant cried she was literally shaking him on her arms. I found out later the midwife/nurse got fired. For this reason i guess? So im curious about this phrase, how true/common is it, origin and why would anyone handle super sensitive babies like that?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08.06.2011, 18:37
Phil_MCR's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 14,952
Groaned at 295 Times in 199 Posts
Thanked 19,019 Times in 8,000 Posts
Phil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond reputePhil_MCR has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

Quote:
View Post
Any thoughts on this phrase? Ive witnessed a midwife from the UK who was spanking instead of just tapping the back of an infant to burp him. And then when the infant cried she was literally shaking him on her arms. I found out later the midwife/nurse got fired. For this reason i guess? So im curious about this phrase, how true/common is it, origin and why would anyone handle super sensitive babies like that?
baby shaker? there's an app for that:

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08.06.2011, 19:39
adrianlondon's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 9,131
Groaned at 170 Times in 153 Posts
Thanked 25,643 Times in 6,892 Posts
adrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

I believe it's a US-originated phrase, no doubt because of this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Woodward_case

"Shake me like a British nanny" was a quote also used in Family Guy (said by Stewie of course).
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08.06.2011, 19:56
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zurich Oberland
Posts: 523
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 470 Times in 239 Posts
woolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputation
Quote:
View Post
I believe it's a US-originated phrase, no doubt because of this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Woodward_case

"Shake me like a British nanny" was a quote also used in Family Guy (said by Stewie of course).
Would just like to point out that Louise Woodward was not a nanny, which in Britain at least means an appropriately qualified childcarer. She was an inexperienced, unqualified au pair. British standards of childcare are as good as anywhere else in the world, don't believe everything you hear on family guy.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08.06.2011, 20:02
adrianlondon's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Basel
Posts: 9,131
Groaned at 170 Times in 153 Posts
Thanked 25,643 Times in 6,892 Posts
adrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond reputeadrianlondon has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

I'm sorry, did you read a totally different post and then quote mine by mistake?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08.06.2011, 20:04
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

Which is why I get concerned about all the requests and adds here for a 'nanny' - which most often turns out to be for unqualified and inexperienced.. and as Louise was - cheap and exploited.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08.06.2011, 21:45
17clarence's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Geneva
Posts: 767
Groaned at 15 Times in 12 Posts
Thanked 965 Times in 440 Posts
17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

In Britain we say "Shake it like a Romanian nanny"
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08.06.2011, 21:54
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Vaud
Posts: 2,459
Groaned at 175 Times in 122 Posts
Thanked 4,947 Times in 1,902 Posts
Mikers has a reputation beyond reputeMikers has a reputation beyond reputeMikers has a reputation beyond reputeMikers has a reputation beyond reputeMikers has a reputation beyond reputeMikers has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

Quote:
View Post
Any thoughts on this phrase? Ive witnessed a midwife from the UK who was spanking instead of just tapping the back of an infant to burp him. And then when the infant cried she was literally shaking him on her arms. I found out later the midwife/nurse got fired. For this reason i guess? So im curious about this phrase, how true/common is it, origin and why would anyone handle super sensitive babies like that?
Your fears are well founded - it is a well known fact that uk nannies (only) are out to kill babies. Steer well clear. Pick a French one or some good looking portugese number, much better reputations.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08.06.2011, 22:12
porsch1909
 
Posts: n/a
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

Quote:
View Post
I'm sorry, did you read a totally different post and then quote mine by mistake?
I am becoming increasingly concerned with some of your posts Adrian. You also told me to go and drown myself recently.

Is there something you need to talk about?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08.06.2011, 22:19
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 11,316
Groaned at 399 Times in 325 Posts
Thanked 17,303 Times in 8,753 Posts
greenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

Quote:
View Post
In Britain we say "Shake it like a Romanian nanny"
Maybe, but then again, you are not famous for being a knowledgeable nation.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08.06.2011, 22:56
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zurich Oberland
Posts: 523
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 470 Times in 239 Posts
woolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputationwoolly has an excellent reputation
Quote:
View Post
I'm sorry, did you read a totally different post and then quote mine by mistake?
I read a thread with 3 posts and tapped the last one to make my contribution. What is there to get your knickers in twist about?!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08.06.2011, 23:15
17clarence's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Geneva
Posts: 767
Groaned at 15 Times in 12 Posts
Thanked 965 Times in 440 Posts
17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute17clarence has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "shake it like a british nanny"

Quote:
View Post
Maybe, but then again, you are not famous for being a knowledgeable nation.
To be fair, no-one actually CAN out shake a British nanny.
Must hark back to the colonial days when British babies were far and above the best and you could only hit them with a wooden spoon, and foreign babies, well just shake the living daylights out of it.

I believe the nanny would also shout "That'll learn ya!" whilst shaking vigorously.
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
British slang words and meanings was [Meaning of the expression "Blimey!"] delfinita Language corner 55 25.10.2009 01:43
"The Great British Breakfast buffet" Ian Nicol Commercial events 6 20.11.2007 14:16
"The Great British Breakfast Buffet" Ian Nicol Commercial events 0 11.09.2007 15:34


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:22.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0