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-   -   Word of the day (https://www.englishforum.ch/general-off-topic/11766-word-day.html)

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 14:00

Re: Word of the day
 
Hmmmmm. . . . . .I don't know if Shutterbugism has the same affect. How's about Drunken Shutterbuglam? I think I'm satisfied with that.

Ooohhh, reminds me. Satiated.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ElJeFe (Post 100407)
Proposal: Drunken Shutterbugism

no?


bubbles4352 04.09.2007 14:05

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Colonelboris (Post 100397)
Three books you might find useful:

Troublesome Words - Bill Bryson
Mother Tongue - Bill Bryson
Roger's Profanisaurus - Viz

Ahhh, the Profanisaurus... Home to such classics as the gland of Hope and Glory, chavalcade, council gritter, ...

Flashman4 04.09.2007 16:35

Re: Word of the day
 
Well I'm British, and a photographer and I love this new addition to my vocabulary.

I'm going to make it my mission to get some of my Swiss work colleagues to start using shutterbuggery too! :D

Flashman4 04.09.2007 16:43

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100402)
<snip>

Can anyone tell me the origins of the word: snog. It's such an ugly word, IMO.

There's a great quiz (billed as the toughest word game on the internet), where you have to guess the origins of certain words, here: http://www.etymologic.com/index.cgi

As for "snog", try this: http://www.allwords.com/word-snog.html

HTH

Polorise 04.09.2007 16:45

Re: Word of the day
 
gargantuan .... I don't here that often enough .... :cool:

Flashman4 04.09.2007 16:48

Re: Word of the day
 
Did a little more searching into the origins of the word "snog" and found this interesting article: http://www.teaspirit.com/teabagladie...7_archive.html

HTH

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 17:01

Re: Word of the day
 
Thanks, I know what snog means but was curious as to the origins. I became even more intimately aquainted with it when a random drunk Brit asked me if I wanted to snog and proceeded to try and shove his tongue down my throat. Which made me reel back in moderate revulsion but also laugh at the absurdity of the statement.

The American equivalent "make-out" is also equally silly. But as a friend of mine would sometimes drunkenly say "I'm going to the top of make-out mountain tonight and I don't care who I'm taking with me." (Technically, I guess in the '50's make-out mountain could have been a place but with her, I think it was a state of mind).


Quote:

Originally Posted by Flashman4 (Post 100509)
Did a little more searching into the origins of the word "snog" and found this interesting article: http://www.teaspirit.com/teabagladie...7_archive.html

HTH


04.09.2007 17:13

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Flashman4 (Post 100509)
Did a little more searching into the origins of the word "snog" and found this interesting article: http://www.teaspirit.com/teabagladie...7_archive.html

The idea of an onomatopoeic origin sounds correct to me. I first came across the word in the early 1960s, either from TV or the school playground.

gbn 04.09.2007 18:04

Re: Word of the day
 
I saw "buggery" in "shutterbuggery" straight away.

The first half is just window dressing...

Polorise 04.09.2007 18:30

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by gbn (Post 100537)
I saw "buggery" in "shutterbuggery" straight away.

The first half is just window dressing...

how long were you in the Falklands chap ??

Lou 05.09.2007 21:30

Re: Word of the day
 
Glaikit for when idiot just doesn't cover it.

Colonelboris 05.09.2007 21:48

Re: Word of the day
 
'Twunt' is a great word that just doesn't sound offensive, yet combines two of the rudest words in the (vernacular) English language.

born2run 05.09.2007 22:24

Re: Word of the day
 
fubar - learned while working for the canadian government

Lou 05.09.2007 22:30

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by born2run (Post 101059)
fubar - learned while working for the canadian government

also commonly used in the computing world ;)

Caroline 05.09.2007 22:47

Re: Word of the day
 
Preposterous, magnanimous, vacillations, jocular, vociferous, perpendicular, juxtaposition but 2 of my all time fave words which dance across my ear lobes are: sphincter and bludgeoned

Fiona 05.09.2007 22:51

Re: Word of the day
 
Hirsute! I just love it... for some reason it gives me a chuckle everytime :D

05.09.2007 23:01

Re: Word of the day
 
I don't think I saw "twunt" before I visited this forum, but immediately recognized what it was.

Quote:

Originally Posted by born2run (Post 101059)
fubar - learned while working for the canadian government

Apparently a US Army phrase from WW II. "ed Up Beyond All Repair".

A computer style write up can be found at:

http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc3092.html

where it also speculates that the German word "furchtbar" (terrible) was a possible influence.

For onomatopoeia, splodge.

Colonelboris 05.09.2007 23:13

Re: Word of the day
 
Fubar is closely related to snafu, both of which are US military parlance for when things go a wee bit wrong, fall of Saigon, that sort of thing.

fubar = f***ed-up beyond all recognition.
snafu = situation normal: all f***ed-up.

Flashman4 06.09.2007 09:45

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lou (Post 101065)
also commonly used in the computing world ;)

...and the American military which is where I first heard it back in 1982

Polorise 06.09.2007 10:25

Re: Word of the day
 
Perspicacious .... sadly little used. Had it once in a reference letter.


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