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chemgoddess 03.09.2007 19:20

Word of the day
 
There have been some real great words mentioned recently on the forum which, IMHO, don't get enough use these days.

ex. dullard, poppycock

My word of the day is kakistocracy.

Points will be given to whoever uses it the best in a sentence.

Thalwiler 03.09.2007 19:32

Re: Word of the day
 
Kakistocracy abbreviated to Bush...

Flashman4 03.09.2007 21:52

Re: Word of the day
 
The Kakistrophic machinations of the country's government landed them repeatedly in the sh*t.
I love this word. I'm all for keeping obscure words alive. :)

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 08:42

Re: Word of the day
 
Curmudgeon: a bad-tempered, difficult, cantankerous person.

Oooohhh, Cantankerous is also good.

04.09.2007 09:13

Re: Word of the day
 
Flippertigibbet.

Two popular deinitions:

1. One who is unreservedly reticent, hence resilient. whose facade would suggest nothing but pure boredom,
whose mind and thoughts wander aimlessly in the midst of everyday life affairs.
2. Foolish young woman

I opt for 2.

Flashman4 04.09.2007 09:18

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100250)
Curmudgeon: a bad-tempered, difficult, cantankerous person.

Oooohhh, Cantankerous is also good.

This is a great thread Chemgoddess as I love our language. See this (earlier) thread:
Quote:

Originally Posted by Flashman4 (Post 36283)
It certainly exists. It's all part of my private campaign to make use of little known / used words to prevent them dying out. :msnnerd:

Found in the post "Whatever happened to literacy?" Started by Mark.

What about smatchet? "n. - a small, nasty person or a nasty child"

Found at:http://www.kokogiak.com/logolepsy/

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 09:24

Re: Word of the day
 
Thanks Flashman, I really do love it to. My appreciation for the preciseness/creativity of the English language has markedly increased since moving over here.

Smatchet? I've never even heard that one before, but I love it.

I've found since moving here my vocabulary is atrocious, I need to build it back up again.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flashman4 (Post 100273)
This is a great thread Chemgoddess as I love our language. See this (earlier) thread:

Found in the post "Whatever happened to literacy?" Started by Mark.

What about smatchet? "n. - a small, nasty person or a nasty child"

Found at:http://www.kokogiak.com/logolepsy/


Shorrick Mk2 04.09.2007 09:32

Re: Word of the day
 
Flabbergasted. Parlay.

04.09.2007 09:43

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100275)
My appreciation for the preciseness/creativity of the English language has markedly increased since moving over here.

Smatchet? I've never even heard that one before, but I love it.

I've found since moving here my vocabulary is atrocious, I need to build it back up again.

You'd probably like the BBC TV programme Call My Bluff, from which I gather the show has been revived.

It was an extremely funny programme, too.

cyrus 04.09.2007 09:54

Re: Word of the day
 
I've always liked "Nefarious", often used by some of my more northern friends.

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 10:07

Re: Word of the day
 
Yes! I know I would have. One of my favorite board games in Balderdash which is basically the same premise.


Quote:

Originally Posted by JVC (Post 100284)
You'd probably like the BBC TV programme Call My Bluff, from which I gather the show has been revived.

It was an extremely funny programme, too.


quintessential; myriad; plenipotentiary; quixotic; magnanimous. Some of my faves.

Oldhand 04.09.2007 10:08

Re: Word of the day
 
I just love the word titivate. My mum used to shout up the stairs when i hogged the bathroom for too long " If you titivate in front of that mirror any longer, you'll see the devil"! :eek:

04.09.2007 10:11

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cyrus (Post 100290)
I've always liked "Nefarious", often used by some of my more northern friends.

Another Northern one: "spurious", when used by a garage mechanic. "A spurious part" means a replacement part sourced from a third party, not the vehicle's manufacturer. Main dealers won't give you these. Spurious parts usually save you a fortune.

möpp 04.09.2007 10:16

Re: Word of the day
 
rambunctious = boisterous, loud, raucous, turbulent. Fantastic word!

PlantHead 04.09.2007 10:20

Re: Word of the day
 
Chuckle..
a much underused word, why laugh when you can have a chuckle.

cyrus 04.09.2007 10:27

Re: Word of the day
 
And jesting instead of joking

Polorise 04.09.2007 10:59

Re: Word of the day
 
Caprice rather than capricious, which is also a good word ...

Glenda Jackson 04.09.2007 12:00

Re: Word of the day
 
It's unfortuntely true that one's vocabulary doesn't get enriched when speaking to people whose mother-tongue isn't English and one tends to use words that will be readily understood rather than confounding them with more abstruse or colloquial expressions! I like to hear words like the ones already mentioned in this thread, and one or two of my own favourites would be "pernickety; perspicacious; disenchanted; marooned; whimsical; coerced, codswallop" Let's hear some more!

ElJeFe 04.09.2007 12:24

Re: Word of the day
 
My favs include: Discombobulate, Obfuscate and Scallywag

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 12:25

Re: Word of the day
 
gregarious; abscond; verbiage; tumultuous; insouciant; lackadaisical


This isn't technically a real word but stems from a great actual word that a friend of mine made it up and I love it. Drunken shutterbuggery.

PlantHead 04.09.2007 12:27

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100357)
Drunken shutterbuggery.


I think you need to give a definition there.

Polorise 04.09.2007 12:28

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenda Jackson (Post 100343)
It's unfortuntely true that one's vocabulary doesn't get enriched when speaking to people whose mother-tongue isn't English and one tends to use words that will be readily understood rather than confounding them with more abstruse or colloquial expressions! I like to hear words like the ones already mentioned in this thread, and one or two of my own favourites would be "pernickety; perspicacious; disenchanted; marooned; whimsical; coerced, codswallop" Let's hear some more!

My wife complains about this in the opposite direction, as my uptake of German vocabulary has been pretty limited (shame on me). That coupled with a young son, has resulted in her German slipping over the last few years.
Time for us both to go back to school .....

Caleb 04.09.2007 12:32

Re: Word of the day
 
I think you'll love this: this website displays a beautiful list of over 500 obscure, arcane, weird words. The nice part is each word features both a definition and a short (not so short, really) etymological reference.

http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/index.htm

Flashman4 04.09.2007 12:36

Re: Word of the day
 
I realised when reading this thread that I use these words a lot in my day to day life / work.

I truly love these words. Just don't get me started on Shakespearean insults :msncrazy:

" Thou wimpled clapper-clawed hedge-pig!"

ElJeFe 04.09.2007 12:37

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100357)
gregarious; abscond; verbiage; tumultuous; insouciant; lackadaisical


This isn't technically a real word but stems from a great actual word that a friend of mine made it up and I love it. Drunken shutterbuggery.

Drunken shutterbuggery: taking pictures whilst drunkenly engaging in a**l-sex ? (combining the words shutterbug and buggery)

Flashman4 04.09.2007 12:39

Re: Word of the day
 
...ps The Shakespearean insults come courtesy of: http://www.pangloss.com/seidel/Shaker/index.html?

terryhall 04.09.2007 12:42

Re: Word of the day
 
Plethora and perusal.

As in

"There is a plethora of fine words in this thread for my perusal"

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 12:49

Re: Word of the day
 
Uh, No. Me, being American, I do not partake in the use of words such as buggery or snogging etc.

The word was coined by Canadian friend. Drunken shutterbugery would be the inebriated taking of pictures when out at the bars that always comes as a great laugh the next morning as not everyone really remembers exactly when/where/why the pictures were taken.

But seriously? What kinda girl you think I am?:eek:

Quote:

Originally Posted by ElJeFe (Post 100364)
Drunken shutterbuggery: taking pictures whilst drunkenly engaging in a**l-sex ? (combining the words shutterbug and buggery)


bubbles4352 04.09.2007 12:53

Re: Word of the day
 
My favourite is callipygian. Try it on www.dictionary.com :)

04.09.2007 12:53

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by terryhall (Post 100367)
Plethora and perusal.

Not forgetting pontification and edification, as in:

"There is a plethora of fine words in this thread for my perusal, pontification and edification"

ElJeFe 04.09.2007 12:59

Re: Word of the day
 
Aaaah, well it all depends whether you're from the US or UK, I believe most people from the UK would spot the word "buggery" in shutterbuggery, whereas Americans would probably not know what it means to begin with. You'd just have to be careful using that word in the UK I guess :D

PlantHead 04.09.2007 13:00

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100369)

But seriously? What kinda girl you think I am?:eek:

A very popular one if the first definition had been correct.

Inspired by this thread I have just described a fellow work collegue of the female persuasion as a

" A damn fine filly"

I feel like a cad now.

04.09.2007 13:12

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenda Jackson (Post 100343)
It's unfortuntely true that one's vocabulary doesn't get enriched when speaking to people whose mother-tongue isn't English and one tends to use words that will be readily understood rather than confounding them with more abstruse or colloquial expressions!

If you like UK style cryptic crosswords, these can be extremely helpful in maintaining your vocabulary.

For an online British English dictionary, I use Chambers Reference Online.

edited to add: I find it incomplete, so other suggestions welcome.

Polorise 04.09.2007 13:15

Re: Word of the day
 
griffonage ... the art of writing / wordsmithing

terryhall 04.09.2007 13:29

Re: Word of the day
 
Sanguine - as in (stolen from some war poem I had to do at school and which stuck in my head) "...their fresh and sanguine sacrifice"

Colonelboris 04.09.2007 13:35

Re: Word of the day
 
Three books you might find useful:

Troublesome Words - Bill Bryson
Mother Tongue - Bill Bryson
Roger's Profanisaurus - Viz

Also, perusal doesn't mean to casually glance at something written, it means to inspect very closely a document or writing, although the opposite meaning is starting to take a hold. Boo!

chemgoddess 04.09.2007 13:42

Re: Word of the day
 
I think you might be able to ascribe that to Mike Meyer's use of the word in Wayne's World.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Colonelboris (Post 100397)
Three books you might find useful:

Troublesome Words - Bill Bryson
Mother Tongue - Bill Bryson
Roger's Profanisaurus - Viz

Also, perusal doesn't mean to casually glance at something written, it means to inspect very closely a document or writing, although the opposite meaning is starting to take a hold. Boo!


chemgoddess 04.09.2007 13:48

Re: Word of the day
 
Can I change the spelling to Shutterbugery? Or would all your pervos from the UK still think of the other meaning?:D

I'll make sure and warn my friend too.;)

Can anyone tell me the origins of the word: snog. It's such an ugly word, IMO.


Quote:

Originally Posted by ElJeFe (Post 100372)
Aaaah, well it all depends whether you're from the US or UK, I believe most people from the UK would spot the word "buggery" in shutterbuggery, whereas Americans would probably not know what it means to begin with. You'd just have to be careful using that word in the UK I guess :D


Colonelboris 04.09.2007 13:51

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100399)
I think you might be able to ascribe that to Mike Meyer's use of the word in Wayne's World.

'we got five thousand doll-ars, we got five thousand doll-ars!'

I still catch myself saying the 'Hmm. Hmm. Yes.. I like what you've done here. Yes.' from that scene whenever given anything to read...

ElJeFe 04.09.2007 13:53

Re: Word of the day
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chemgoddess (Post 100402)
Can I change the spelling to Shutterbugery? Or would all your pervos from the UK still think of the other meaning?:D

Proposal: Drunken Shutterbugism

no?


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