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Old 28.07.2011, 22:00
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Two questions for English speakers

Hi, would you have the time to help me with the following language / grammar questions ?

1. What is the difference between: "I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".

2. What is the difference between "You've got me there" and "You got me there" ?

Thanks
Tom
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  #2  
Old 28.07.2011, 22:04
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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Hi, would you have the time to help me with the following language / grammar questions ?

1. What is the difference between: "I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".

2. What is the difference between "I got it!" and "I've got it" ?

Thanks
Tom
If you knew Indianapolis, like I know her, you'd probably have it, too.

P.S. In each question, one choice is wrong.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:05
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

I think...

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Hi, would you have the time to help me with the following language / grammar questions ?

1. What is the difference between: "I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".
First one refers to the place.
Second one to an event. (like the grand prix)

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2. What is the difference between "You've got me there" and "You got me there" ?
First one means "You helped me reach some place".
Second one means "You've caught me / You've beaten me".
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:10
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

I would say

1. If referring to Indianapolis the capital of Indiana, you would be "in" Indianapolis. If referring to e.g. the speedway track you would be "at" Indianapolis.

2. First example is present continuous tense, "You have got me there". Possibly implies the discussion continues, or more thinking is required. The second is the simple past tense, implies the discussion or action is complete.

Although....bring on the grammar experts....
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:11
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

"I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".

2. What is the difference between "You've got me there" and "You got me there" ?

you would say 'in' when its a big place like a city or a country, like i would not say that, "tomorro i am going at zurich", it would be, "tomorro i am going in to zurich".

'You've' and 'you', you've is a shortened version of 'You have got me there'. It is bad grammer and just a shortened version due to a 'slang' term and accent, especially me being Irish we tend to shorten words, for example.

All in all its just bad grammer

hope this helps, by the way im not in any way an English teacher!!!
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:11
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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1. What is the difference between: "I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".
In Indianapolis refers to the city, at Indianapolis refers to an event or thing (The Indianapolis 500 or Indianapolis Speedway).
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:14
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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I think...

First one means "You helped me reach some place".
.
No...i know what you mean but its not right. You'd have to say "You took me there" or "You have taken me there" to mean that, but i can't imagine anybody ever saying that.

Imagine

Terry - I'm in Bern
Bob - How did you get there?
Terry - You took me there.......how did you forget that, you idiot?
Bob - Oh yes, so I did.

Wouldn't ever happen

OP - In each of your examples, as said before, one is right, one is wrong. Thats the only difference. The "wrong" one is maybe used, but isn't strictly correct
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:15
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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No...i know what you mean but its not right. You'd have to say "You took me there" or "You have taken me there" to mean that, but i can't imagine anybody ever saying that.

Imagine

Terry - I'm in Bern
Bob - How did you get there?
Terry - You took me there.......how did you forget that, you idiot?
Bob - Oh yes, so I did.

Wouldn't ever happen

OP - In each of your examples, as said before, one is right, one is wrong. Thats the only difference. The "wrong" one is maybe used, but isn't strictly correct
Hmmm...could be. Probably is. I'm no scholar.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:16
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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"I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".

2. What is the difference between "You've got me there" and "You got me there" ?

you would say 'in' when its a big place like a city or a country, like i would not say that, "tomorro i am going at zurich", it would be, "tomorro i am going in to zurich".

'You've' and 'you', you've is a shortened version of 'You have got me there'. It is bad grammer and just a shortened version due to a 'slang' term and accent, especially me being Irish we tend to shorten words, for example.

All in all its just bad grammer

hope this helps, by the way im not in any way an English teacher!!!
No, I'm afraid you're totally wrong. If you don't know then it is best not to offer advice. You've is not bad grammar it is just a short form of You have. The first answers after the OP say everything that needs saying....
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:21
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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First example is present continuous tense, "You have got me there". Possibly implies the discussion continues, or more thinking is required. The second is the simple past tense, implies the discussion or action is complete.
A continuous tense requires a present participle, which none of these sentences have.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:23
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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1. What is the difference between:
"I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".
I was in [the city of] Indianapolis. is correct (but why, there?).

I was at Indianapolis, may be spoken but is grammatically inaccurate - for an event, you should say: "I was at the (definite article required) Indianapolis 500 (additional clarification required)

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2. What is the difference between:
"You've got me there" and "You got me there" ?
Is always have with got - but this becomes you've/I've/he's (he has) and is often not heard, or just dropped altogether when spoken.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:26
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

This is the English Forum, only foreigners would ask an intelligent question about English grammar because very few native English speakers could tell their verb from their adjective to their onomatopoeia. We just know because we're clever in using the most useful and descriptive language on this planet - innit?
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:33
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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I was in [the city of] Indianapolis. is correct (but why, there?).

I was at Indianapolis, may be spoken but is grammatically inaccurate - for an event, you should say: "I was at the (definite article required) Indianapolis 500 (additional clarification required)



Is always have with got - but this becomes you've/I've/he's (he has) and is often not heard, or just dropped altogether when spoken.
Absolutely correct. I know Americans say, "you got me there". Do the English use it as well or do they tend to use the more proper form?
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:35
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

I think speech among the British is becoming more and more americanised (I myself am guilty of over-using the phatic "like"). However, I think dropping the "have" when using "got" is quite unusual. I expect we'll see it more and more as time goes on.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:36
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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This is the English Forum, only foreigners would ask an intelligent question about English grammar because very few native English speakers could tell their verb from their adjective to their onomatopoeia. We just know because we're clever in using the most useful and descriptive language on this planet - innit?
You got me there.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:39
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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I was in [the city of] Indianapolis. is correct (but why, there?)
Thanks ... I am currently reading the autobiography of Eddie Rickenbacker and asked myself why he was using the term "at" (a city) a lot. Now it makes sense, he was talking about the races

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Is always have with got - but this becomes you've/I've/he's (he has) and is often not heard, or just dropped altogether when spoken.
Okay now I get it

Thank you all for taking the time to respond !!
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:43
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

Just to chime in here:

1) in or at. As correctly pointed out, in would indicate in a place such in a hotel, in a city, in her bedroom whereas at indicates a specific place or event such at at Cinema City (where did you see the film?) where do you buy your pet food (at Migros) etc

2) you got or you've got. In my experience "you got" tends to be heard in American English rather than British English. The correct (grammatically speaking) form would be you've which is a contraction of you have (got=have, again as already pointed out)

Don't worry too much about it though, I think every native speaker would certainly know what you mean. I remember having difficulty distinguishing between Zu and Nach in German.

@ Assassin, hopefully some of the English native speakers know the difference between eg comfortable and the noise of a fly.
Cheers
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:51
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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1. What is the difference between: "I was in Indianapolis" and "I was at Indianapolis".
The second one only makes sense if Indianapolis is known by context to be an event. "See any big races last year? I was at Indianapolis."
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2. What is the difference between "You've got me there" and "You got me there" ?
"You got me there."
Two possibilities come to mind: 1) the speaker was recently puzzled or otherwise beaten by the listener. 2) The listener helped the speaker reach some (quite possibly allegorical) place. Tennis player and Coach "How did it feel to win? Hey, you got me there."

"You've got me there."
Idiom for 1) above. I think it is just idiom in that it is not grammatically correct. My ear wants to turn it into "You've gotten me there.", which is odd, but perhaps could be used in some context to mean something like 2) above.

And of course, this is just by my poor American ear, if you want a (more) certain answer, you should find an English major.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:54
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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"You've got me there."
Idiom for 1) above . I think it is just idiom in that it is not grammatically correct. My ear wants to turn it into "You've gotten me there.", which is odd, but perhaps could be used in some context to mean something like 2) above.
There is no such word as 'gotten' in the English language.
'You've' as a short form of 'You have' is not bad grammar.
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Old 28.07.2011, 22:56
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Re: Two questions for English speakers

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The second one only makes sense if Indianapolis is known by context to be an event. "See any big races last year? I was at Indianapolis."

"You got me there."
Two possibilities come to mind: 1) the speaker was recently puzzled or otherwise beaten by the listener. 2) The listener helped the speaker reach some (quite possibly allegorical) place. Tennis player and Coach "How did it feel to win? Hey, you got me there."

"You've got me there."
Idiom for 1) above . I think it is just idiom in that it is not grammatically correct. My ear wants to turn it into "You've gotten me there.", which is odd, but perhaps could be used in some context to mean something like 2) above.
Ouch, very American that (but obviously not incorrect, the UK doesn't hold a patent on English). A UK English speaker would never use "gotten". Otherwise I wouldn't fault anything you said.
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