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MusicChick 23.10.2011 19:11

Word of Today
 
Ok, calling all the word geeks - state a word, that stayed in your mind lately, that you haven't used for a while, or rediscovered..

I'll start :D

Roughhousing

Is there a French equivalent, by the way?

FMX 23.10.2011 21:44

Re: Word of Today
 
The translation in the dictionary is chahuter, bousculer.

The french equivalent could be chahut, bousculade, bagarre, émeute (with violence).

As for an equivalent in any of the patois romands I don't know.

Guest 23.10.2011 21:50

Re: Word of Today
 
Word of the day in our house has been "vomit" :(

cannut 23.10.2011 21:53

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Word of the day in our house has been "vomit" :(
Its time to call the grand parents :rolleyes:

MusicChick 23.10.2011 22:06

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FMX (Post 1385445)
The translation in the dictionary is chahuter, bousculer.

The french equivalent could be chahut, bousculade, bagarre, émeute (with violence).

As for an equivalent in any of the patois romands I don't know.

That's great. I have heard of chahut, mostly it's "arretez les conneries" or something similarly sounding..if you want to stop the roughhousing.

Quote:

Word of the day in our house has been "vomit" :(
Ew, poor you. Too much fondue? That's projectile..

ecb 23.10.2011 22:20

Re: Word of Today
 
Roughhousing is not a word I had ever heard until an American friend used it, so I rather assumed it was American English ... but of course it could just be my own ignorance. I would instead use boisterous or rowdy play, or rough and tumble.

I do (British) English localisation work with an environmental consultancy and I recently had reason to include "salubrious" in a document. My (Swiss) colleagues all thought this was a fabulous word, mostly because of the way "it rolls around the mouth" as one of them said. We were only discussing last week how it now keeps popping up in our heads and we are finding it difficult not to use it.

MusicChick 23.10.2011 22:26

Re: Word of Today
 
Salubrious sounds pleasant. Not that I have ever actually used it. :o:D

I think serendipity is a nice word that does not get used often enough..

ecb 23.10.2011 22:31

Re: Word of Today
 
Probably more usually heard in the form of "insalubrious" meaning not just healthy but not healthy in a, well, very wholesome sort of way! I must admit I find insalubrious quite useful.

My first job (aged 16) was gift wrapping in a gift shop called "Serendipity" which I always thought was a rather good name for those sort of twee trinket type shops where you just fall upon something rather nice to buy rather than actively go in seeking something specific.

NSchulzi 23.10.2011 22:32

Re: Word of Today
 
Discombobulated. Lovely word, and kind of sums up the way I feel at the moment.

ecb 23.10.2011 22:34

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nicolaschulz (Post 1385509)
Discombobulated. Lovely word, and kind of sums up the way I feel at the moment.

Mmmmmhhhh .. another roll around your mouth word. :msngrin:

NSchulzi 23.10.2011 22:40

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ecb (Post 1385511)
Mmmmmhhhh .. another roll around your mouth word. :msngrin:

Indeed! And I also love serendipity - 'a lucky, chance happening' :)

23.10.2011 22:48

Re: Word of Today
 
The first Swissgerman word I learned 25 years ago --- giggerig ;)

CLV 23.10.2011 22:49

Re: Word of Today
 
I have always been a fan of posterior..

NSchulzi 23.10.2011 23:00

Re: Word of Today
 
I have always loved the word moist. An old friend of mine always pronounced it in such a way that it became an onomatopoeia.

ecb 23.10.2011 23:09

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nicolaschulz (Post 1385532)
I have always loved the word moist. An old friend of mine always pronounced it in such a way that it became an onomatopoeia.

No NO NOOOOoooooo!

I had an index on my card file when I worked with "banned words" listed .. and you guessed it .. moist was one of them. Ugh! Along with gusset (referring to a folder with pockets and concertina sides) and a lovely spread (when referring to a buffet of course). :D

NSchulzi 23.10.2011 23:12

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ecb (Post 1385541)
No NO NOOOOoooooo!

I had an index on my card file when I worked with "banned words" listed .. and you guessed it .. moist was one of them. Ugh! Along with gusset (referring to a folder with pockets and concertina sides) and a lovely spread (when referring to a buffet of course). :D

I am with you on gusset. A very ugly word, although it does make me snigger. :msnblush:

Ace1 24.10.2011 09:26

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MusicChick (Post 1385340)
Roughhousing

Is there a French equivalent, by the way?

Dunno. Is there an English equivalent?

PaddyG 24.10.2011 09:57

Re: Word of Today
 
Wasn't "gonorrhoea" once voted the most beautiful word in the English language?

The_Love_Doctor 24.10.2011 10:02

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nicolaschulz (Post 1385509)
Discombobulated. Lovely word, and kind of sums up the way I feel at the moment.

Never heard of it... What does it mean?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nicolaschulz (Post 1385532)
I have always loved the word moist. An old friend of mine always pronounced it in such a way that it became an onomatopoeia.

Would be interesting to hear how you friend pronounced moist to make it sound like moisture? being moist?? :eek:

MusicChick 24.10.2011 12:03

Re: Word of Today
 
Moist is definitely on the list of words that give me heebeejeebees. Together with delicious, batch, groin and loin. :msncrazy: I can't make myself say it. We did write a couple of songs with my guitarist purposely putting these in lyrics to give me more edge when playing during gigs, hahaha...

French would be chou-chou. Anything that repeats in French is a tad odd for me.

Today's special word for me is mungo. I think I have seen it once.

MusicChick 24.10.2011 12:05

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ace1 (Post 1385669)
Dunno. Is there an English equivalent?

Rough play. When you chase and bug somebody, throw stuff. It's still a play, though.

NSchulzi 24.10.2011 12:08

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by The_Love_Doctor (Post 1385717)
Never heard of it... What does it mean?



Would be interesting to hear how you friend pronounced moist to make it sound like moisture? being moist?? :eek:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/discombobulate

It's difficult to describe, but she really drew the word out so that is sounded, well, moist!! :o

MusicChick 24.10.2011 12:12

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nicolaschulz (Post 1385885)
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/discombobulate

It's difficult to describe, but she really drew the word out so that is sounded, well, moist!! :o

I can hear it. Soft with all the fricatives hushed. Aaaaahhhhh, moist is going to chase me today :D

swissotter 24.10.2011 12:25

Re: Word of Today
 
everyone stop saying moist!
ok i love this thread but all i can think of are chinese (canto) words i have been using recently.
not word of the day but phrase of the day is "what is a weekend?"
(maggie smith says this in downton abbey, which i am currently obsessing over)

i've taken to using this phrase whenever i come across something i think is beneath me ;)

MusicChick 24.10.2011 12:30

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by swissotter (Post 1385909)
everyone stop saying moist!
ok i love this thread but all i can think of are chinese (canto) words i have been using recently.
not word of the day but phrase of the day is "what is a weekend?"
(maggie smith says this in downton abbey, which i am currently obsessing over)

i've taken to using this phrase whenever i come across something i think is beneath me ;)

I love it. I think I will adopt it, if you allow me. Though it will make me feel all nuts since "what is a weekend" when I don't often have one is rather...douche (ok, another ugly word that I say just coz it gives me creeps, so is rad, aaaah, help).

I think my fav phrase of this week comes from the playlist I follow, something I listen to every week, this week it comes with a nice title :D

October 17, 2011: The bliss is the paranoia is the bliss | See the playlist | Listen: MP3 - 128K | http://wfmu.org/flashplayer/playbuttont.gif Pop‑up player!

Think it is totally t-shirt worthy.

swissotter 24.10.2011 12:32

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MusicChick (Post 1385914)
I love it. I think I will adopt it, if you allow me. Though it will make me feel all nuts since "what is a weekend" when I don't often have one is rather...douche

well you could take to saying "what is a day off?" instead ;)


ooh, i just can't resist...

MusicChick 24.10.2011 12:36

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by swissotter (Post 1385918)
well you could take to saying "what is a day off?" instead ;)

Heh, I think I will modify it to weekend is for the weak ...:D


Quote:

Originally Posted by swissotter (Post 1385918)
ooh, i just can't resist...

You got it.

Treverus 24.10.2011 12:45

Re: Word of Today
 
My Swiss German word of the day is "Gewalthaufen" - a Swiss military tactic that made their mercenaries so effective and valueable some centuries ago. It roughly translates into "violent heap". I had Thai for lunch.

Ace1 24.10.2011 12:48

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MusicChick (Post 1385880)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ace1
Dunno. Is there an English equivalent?

Rough play. When you chase and bug somebody, throw stuff. It's still a play, though.

Yes, I was able to find it in an American dictionary, thanks anyway.

MusicChick 24.10.2011 13:03

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Treverus (Post 1385937)
My Swiss German word of the day is "Gewalthaufen" - a Swiss military tactic that made their mercenaries so effective and valueable some centuries ago. It roughly translates into "violent heap". I had Thai for lunch.

Does it mean attacking? In herds?

SamWeiseVielleicht 24.10.2011 13:18

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MusicChick (Post 1385967)
Does it mean attacking? In herds?


It actually means "pike square" a military tactic used very successfully by the Swiss in ye olden times. ("Pike square" sounds like some special "moves" in a card game to me.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pike_square

Another word I quite like, but would probably not use for fear of ridicule is "squalidness", the antithesis of onomatopoiesis...

Meisie 24.10.2011 13:40

Re: Word of Today
 
Oligodendroglia (cells insulating part of the nerve cells in the central nervous system).
The very first crazy word I learnt when studying years ago. I love this silly word and it's always stuck with me :)

Guest 24.10.2011 15:14

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MusicChick (Post 1385340)

Roughhousing

Is there a French equivalent, by the way?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ace1 (Post 1385669)
Dunno. Is there an English equivalent?

Probably not the same but it reminded me of "Rough-arsed" as in rough as a robber's dog. :D

MusicChick 25.10.2011 09:50

Re: Word of Today
 
Hmmm....today's special is paronomania. I wonder if people do know some serious paronomaniacs. I do have a friend who basically only talks in word puns, quotes and references, it's a good mental exercise but a tad impractical at times. At least it is in one language, only.

No. 2 would be wilderbeast.

Assassin 25.10.2011 09:58

Re: Word of Today
 
Whatever happened to "pinnacle'?

In the eighties, "pinnacle" was the "awesome" of the day, the ultimate achievement, the nirvana of being itself.

"Paradigm" seems to have gone that way too. Much abused and over used during the last Presidential Elections in the US of A, "paradigm" has become a victim of its own efficiency, ultimately suffering its own nemesis in the media.

At least I think so.

Guest 25.10.2011 10:08

Re: Word of Today
 
Awesome has also been overused.

"How was your day?"
"Oh, just did the washing and watched daytime TV."
"Awesome!"
"You need a punch in the face".

MusicChick 25.10.2011 10:12

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

"Awesome!"
"You need a punch in the face".
http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...3hT8m5o_NKq8XM

HashBrown 25.10.2011 10:21

Re: Word of Today
 
Epic is the new awesome, pinnacle, amazing.

MusicChick 25.10.2011 10:35

Re: Word of Today
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HashBrown (Post 1386869)
Epic is the new awesome, pinnacle, amazing.

I think it's old already...words are flaky creatures :D

c123 25.10.2011 11:13

Re: Word of Today
 
Would have to make an exception for "doudou" in French (it's what French children call their favourite cuddly toy or comforting blanket/scarf that goes with them everywhere).

My suggestion for overused English word of the moment (UK only) is "fantastic". When I left the UK it wasn't that commonly used, and still had a minor "out of this world", "something to do with fantasy". I notivced on a trip back to the UK 5-6 years ago that everyone was using it. Now when anyone is interviewed in the UK (especially for sport) everything is "fantastic". "Bollox" I say, get a thesaurus and start using other superlatives!

My candidate for word of the day is, with a nod to Blackadder ("Goes Forth" series), "Gobbledygook" :)

p.s. my quotes are a mess - can anyone point me to a decent online guide about using quotes, and also regarding punctuation and parentheses please...


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