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  #2261  
Old 13.01.2023, 09:22
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Re: Ask a Scientist

The red of either is still, high-pressure air with trapped dust reflecting light. The low pressure (coming from the west) that follows brings unstable air--rain, wind and/or snow. Generally reliable here, too, as most of our weather comes from CH. :-)
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  #2262  
Old 13.01.2023, 09:56
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I am sure it is also valid for alpine regions. I read in a biography of one early 20th century Alpinist that they had a saying "Morgens rot, abends todt." i.e. don't go climbing if you wake up in such a morning.
I did wake up into many early mornings in the mountains, at some point the light was always reddish (if it was not all grey from clouds), so I still don't know about what kind of red we are talking.
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  #2263  
Old 13.01.2023, 17:01
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Ancient farmers rule:

Kräht der Hahn auf dem Mist
Ändert sich's Wetter
Oder's bleibt wie es ist

When the cock crows on the dung heap
The weather will change
Or it stays as it is

You have about 2/3 hit chance by positing that the weather tomorrow will be roughly the same as today. I seem to remmber that this was also the weather forecast's hitrate until a few decades ago.

The main problem for the mountaineers is that weather swings can happen within hours, that's rare in the flatter areas.
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  #2264  
Old 13.01.2023, 17:18
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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The main problem for the mountaineers is that weather swings can happen within hours, that's rare in the flatter areas.
There's a lot of micrometeorology involved with mountain areas which causes rapid and drastic changes.

These don't occur in the same way on the flatlands.

An example would be moist air being blown up a mountain face, condensing and forming dense mountain fog (basically cloud). This can happen in minutes.
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  #2265  
Old 16.01.2023, 09:38
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Re: Ask a Scientist

There was a deep red sky this morning.

Here is the midnight surface pressure chart showing a low centred over the Ënglish channel and the winds therefore coming from the west over Switzerland:



The midday today chart shows the cold front moving in with rain coming in around lunchtime:



For those who don't know:

The blue triangles are a cold front, normally bringing rain.
The black lines are the flow of the wind. The closer they are together, the stronger the wind.
The numbers indicate the air pressure in mbars.
If you stand with your back to the wind, the centre of low pressure is on your left!
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  #2266  
Old 22.01.2023, 14:44
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Another couple of food related questions.

Why did mutton go out of fashion? It used to be very popular years and years ago so why did it become food non grata? Is there that much difference between mutton and lamb?

Why is corn called "sweet corn". Are there other types that aren't sweet?
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  #2267  
Old 22.01.2023, 14:50
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why is corn called "sweet corn". Are there other types that aren't sweet?
Field corn.

This is a variety usually fed to livestock, or used in other processes.
Sweet corn, the 'corn on the cob' we eat ,is a variety developed wiht a higher sugar content, hence the sweeter taste.


(When we first moved to Switzerland, the owner of our local Beiz one day eagerly told us 'Merikins that he was introducing corn on the cob as a side. We felt an obligation to order it, if only to fly the flag... and you guessed it, he proudly served us field corn. Yikes. Since then, Switzerland seems to have cottoned on to the difference.)

ETA:

More than you probably wanted to know about corn, from Purdue University (Indiana)
https://extension.purdue.edu/news/20...s-of-corn.html


ETA2.

Can't answer your lamb/mutton question, as we don't eat it, thanks to another Hoosier farm 'thing'. OH's grandfather came in from the fields one day with a newborn lamb. The mother had died, the lamb had to be hand raised - so he gave that task to my husband, then a young child. 'Billy Butter' grew strong and became OH's best mate that summer, following him everywhere. Then one day Grandpa said it was time. Time for what?, innocent child asked. Grandpa then explained the reality of life on a farm.

OH never ate lamb - or mutton - again.

Last edited by meloncollie; 22.01.2023 at 15:10.
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  #2268  
Old 22.01.2023, 14:53
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why is corn called "sweet corn". Are there other types that aren't sweet?
Not a scientist answer, just a layman's conjecture

1) calling it "sweet" makes it more appealing/marketable
2) it's not to do with the type but with the time when harvested. When fully ripe, the corn seed becomes very hard and generally milled for corn flour. The seed is sweet and "juicy" at a intermediate stage its development


P.S. I stand corrected - Sweet corn is actually a distinct variety of corn/maize https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_corn

Last edited by dandi; 22.01.2023 at 15:29.
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  #2269  
Old 22.01.2023, 14:59
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Re: Ask a Scientist

To differentiate it from the corn used to make plastics?
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  #2270  
Old 22.01.2023, 15:20
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Another couple of food related questions.

Why did mutton go out of fashion? It used to be very popular years and years ago so why did it become food non grata? Is there that much difference between mutton and lamb?

Why is corn called "sweet corn". Are there other types that aren't sweet?
Possibly because mutton requires long and slow cooking and people cannot be bothered to do that today.
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  #2271  
Old 22.01.2023, 15:31
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Possibly because mutton requires long and slow cooking and people cannot be bothered to do that today.
The internet says it was due to intensive cattle factories (feed lots) in the U.S. which gave Americans a taste for steak which was previously too expensive.

Sheep can't be farmed intensively and lamb, which is a bit more popular is cheaper to produce due to the shorter rearing time.

I think now people don't like the taste. It's quite strong.
Lamb really isn't popular in Switzerland either and only the more-bland tasting cutlets are a more common restaurant dish.
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  #2272  
Old 22.01.2023, 16:19
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Possibly because mutton requires long and slow cooking and people cannot be bothered to do that today.
Readily available at Metro for making mutton curry!
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  #2273  
Old 22.01.2023, 16:46
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Readily available at Metro for making mutton curry!
As I'm sure you're aware, India does not have the beef eating habit of the U.S!
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  #2274  
Old 22.01.2023, 16:48
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why did mutton go out of fashion? It used to be very popular years and years ago so why did it become food non grata? Is there that much difference between mutton and lamb?
Cotton and synthetics replaced wool, that reduced the supply of the byproduct meat. Nowadays, with cheap clothing available in abundance, the wool (and the need to shear) may be more a problem than additional use.
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  #2275  
Old 18.02.2023, 17:12
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Re: Ask a Scientist

How come we are told not to feed chicken to dogs (in case the bones choke them), and yet foxes apparently eat chickens?
How come a fox can eat chicken, but a dog cannot?
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  #2276  
Old 18.02.2023, 18:57
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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How come we are told not to feed chicken to dogs (in case the bones choke them), and yet foxes apparently eat chickens?
How come a fox can eat chicken, but a dog cannot?
Growing up we had a black Labrador. She ate everything including the bones.

I think it’ll either an old wife’s tail or an urban myth.

A little searching tells me that raw chicken bones are OK (which the Fox is likely to find) but cooked ones will be softer and more likely to splinter.
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  #2277  
Old 16.07.2023, 09:14
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Why do soup spoons have a round shape?
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  #2278  
Old 16.07.2023, 09:26
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why do soup spoons have a round shape?
Quora has already answered that, but only cream soup or bouillon spoons are completely round; the others are oval. I have both styles.

https://www.quora.com/Why-is-a-soup-...m%20the%20side.
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  #2279  
Old 16.07.2023, 09:32
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why do soup spoons have a round shape?
Everything about soup from an American viewpoint:

https://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsoups.html


except an answer to your question. Maybe in order to be able to sell you an extra set of spoons?
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  #2280  
Old 16.07.2023, 10:24
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Everything about soup from a US viewpoint:

https://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsoups.html
Ftfy
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