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  #721  
Old 06.10.2008, 22:51
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Re: Ask a Scientist

60% of the time. . . it works every time.
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  #722  
Old 06.10.2008, 22:52
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Ha classic!
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  #723  
Old 07.10.2008, 00:14
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Did you know that 99% of all statistics are wrong
83.74% of statistics are made up.
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  #724  
Old 07.10.2008, 00:29
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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83.74% of statistics are made up.
yeah thats what i meant to say in the first place lol
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  #725  
Old 22.10.2008, 18:50
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Why doesn't anyone study thoughts
like physicists study their particles ... ?
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  #726  
Old 22.10.2008, 18:57
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why doesn't anyone study thoughts
like physicists study their particles ... ?
Psychologists do study thoughts. See for example
http://www.chicagogsb.edu/magazine/29/2/cover.aspx
Prof. Epley at Uni Chicago GSB Business School has done some fascinating research on "mind reading"
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  #727  
Old 24.10.2008, 19:19
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I saw this article recently. http://www.waste-management-world.co...m-in-road-dust

Apparently, there are large amounts of precious metals just lying along the roadsides. Could I become a road sweeper and make my fortune?

Rod
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  #728  
Old 25.10.2008, 16:37
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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I saw this article recently. http://www.waste-management-world.co...m-in-road-dust

Apparently, there are large amounts of precious metals just lying along the roadsides. Could I become a road sweeper and make my fortune?

Rod
We were given a talk on this some time ago at Bern. However, you're likely to lose a lot of cash when you look at how much it would cost to separate out all the other rubbish and isolate the metals from each other.
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  #729  
Old 11.06.2009, 09:08
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Looks like I won my argument .

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8093374.stm




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Many years ago in a Chemistry class while at high school I had an argument with my chem teacher about the periodic table. She insisted it was complete and there would never be any more elements to add to it whereas I said there was no way she could know that as she could not predict what new scientific discoveries we will have in the future. Which side do you take in this argument?
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  #730  
Old 12.06.2009, 11:08
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Is one kilo of Iron heavier or one kilo of cotton?
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  #731  
Old 12.06.2009, 11:11
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Why in all the maps of earth, north pole is up and south is down?
Earth is a ball and you can look at it from any angle you like!
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  #732  
Old 12.06.2009, 11:30
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Is one kilo of Iron heavier or one kilo of cotton?
Assuming a solid-ish lump of each, sitting on a table: iron, just slightly.

Iron is denser, so it's a smaller lump, so its centroid is closer to the earth's, so the gravitational forces between them are greater - in other words, it's heavier.

It's nowhere near a measurable amount though.
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  #733  
Old 12.06.2009, 11:41
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Assuming a solid-ish lump of each, sitting on a table: iron, just slightly.

Iron is denser, so it's a smaller lump, so its centroid is closer to the earth's, so the gravitational forces between them are greater - in other words, it's heavier.

It's nowhere near a measurable amount though.
Hmmm. What about the effects of the energy in the earth's magnetic field? Whichever way it goes it's going to effect the iron to a higher degree although, of course, there is iron in cotton, the amount varying according to soil and water type.
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  #734  
Old 12.06.2009, 11:44
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Assuming a solid-ish lump of each, sitting on a table: iron, just slightly.

Iron is denser, so it's a smaller lump, so its centroid is closer to the earth's, so the gravitational forces between them are greater - in other words, it's heavier.

It's nowhere near a measurable amount though.
I don't know... I agree that the gravitational force is different but the weight is the same:

Force=m(in kg) x g (9.81 m/s^2)

The radius of the Earth etc is accounted for in g, not in m ! So m is the same for both (1 kg)

isn't knitpicking fun
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  #735  
Old 12.06.2009, 11:48
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Assuming a solid-ish lump of each, sitting on a table: iron, just slightly.

Iron is denser, so it's a smaller lump, so its centroid is closer to the earth's, so the gravitational forces between them are greater - in other words, it's heavier.

It's nowhere near a measurable amount though.
Might be valid point.

What about Archemides law effect? Cotton takes more space so in the air (which is a like a liquid) it becomes lighter (amount is the weight of air having similar volume to the cotton). And this amount is more than equivalent dense Iron.
Doey anyone agree?
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  #736  
Old 12.06.2009, 12:08
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why in all the maps of earth, north pole is up and south is down?
Earth is a ball and you can look at it from any angle you like!

Here's what I learned from a recent episode of West Wing. It comes from a Eurocentric mindset that size is an indication of importance, and Up is better than Down. In many maps, Europe is larger than South America, and Greenland is larger than Africa.

According to the Peters Project, this is a more proportionally correct Map:


And taking the less Eurocentric view, this is what your world looks like:




Disclaimer: I think this Peters guy is Australian
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  #737  
Old 12.06.2009, 12:27
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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And taking the less Eurocentric view, this is what your world looks like:




Disclaimer: I think this Peters guy is Australian
Yes I like this map, at least shows our mindset is not always the only correct one!
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  #738  
Old 12.06.2009, 13:01
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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As I emember the whole COLD FUSION issue was debunked and never reporduced and so being widely discredited, does not occur... Pons and Fleischman (now I know some German I understand his namefinally!). But occassional reports ocur re excess heat production that has been interpreted as support for cold fusion. I dunno, it would be great had it occurred, I rememebr reading about it in Science and telling my friends that this was the breakthrough the world needed... too bad
Related:

http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Tabletop...neutron_source
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  #739  
Old 12.06.2009, 13:14
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Hmmm. What about the effects of the energy in the earth's magnetic field? Whichever way it goes it's going to effect the iron to a higher degree although, of course, there is iron in cotton, the amount varying according to soil and water type.
No good. A force is a force (of course, of course) but weight is defined* as the sum of forces applied in one particular way, by gravitational attraction. Forces applied in other ways aren't included in that tally so they don't affect the weight.

*If that sounds slightly dodgy, stick a magnet to the fridge: do you say to yourself that the magnet is now weightless, or that there's something else holding it up? Or put something under one leg of the coffee table. Water runs down the tabletop now, because of gravity. Why don't the books slide off too - are they weightless, or is another force (friction) acting on them?

Quote:
Might be valid point.

What about Archemides law effect? Cotton takes more space so in the air (which is a like a liquid) it becomes lighter (amount is the weight of air having similar volume to the cotton). And this amount is more than equivalent dense Iron.
Doey anyone agree?
Nope. We don't say a helium balloon is weightless or has negative weight, after all - we say it's lighter than air. It still has the same weight, it's just that the equivalent volume of air has more weight, so it displaces the balloon.

The only way air affects weight (as defined above, the net of all gravitational forces) is by all the little air molecules overhead exerting their own gravitational pull. There would be more air molecules above the iron than above the cotton, resulting in a slightly stronger gravitational force upward.

Enough to counteract the increased gravitational attraction from being closer to the earth though? Not hardly! The basic reasoning here is that the earth's gravitational pull is already dominant over the atmosphere's (otherwise you'd fall up, right?) and so moving toward the earth increases that, more than it decreases the atmosphere's.
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  #740  
Old 12.06.2009, 13:15
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Re: Ask a Scientist

.
How did they make the non-stick stick to my frying pan?
.
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