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  #1141  
Old 30.06.2010, 15:17
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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...The number and location and size of the continents changes with time, as does the total number of plates.
It goes without saying that even the best staff will drop a plate or two from time to time. It just can't be helped.
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  #1142  
Old 30.06.2010, 16:36
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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It goes without saying that even the best staff will drop a plate or two from time to time. It just can't be helped.
Texaner:I expected your answer will be: God created one plates each day (6 totally) and they will never fall unless he wishes
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  #1143  
Old 30.06.2010, 16:49
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Texaner:I expected your answer will be: God created one plates each day (6 totally) and they will never fall unless he wishes
Sorry to disappoint, but I wasn't aware He had His own line of dinnerware.
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  #1144  
Old 14.07.2010, 16:26
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Do you agree that finally found that chicks were made before eggs!:

http://itn.co.uk/6b98bf7912ffaaa4470e47e032a23691.html
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  #1145  
Old 14.07.2010, 17:29
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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do you agree that finally found that chicks were made before eggs!:
Attachment 17058
__________

Last edited by weejeem; 14.10.2011 at 15:03.
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  #1146  
Old 18.11.2010, 08:48
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Antimatter caught, for 1 sixth of a second ...

will the big bang theory soon be proven invalid?
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  #1147  
Old 18.11.2010, 12:59
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Antimatter caught, for 1 sixth of a second ...

will the big bang theory soon be proven invalid?
It is unlikely to invalidate the theory but could help improve it, as being able to study antimatter may help us understand why there is so little of it in the universe.

The current standard version of the theory suggests that matter and antimatter should have been created in equal amounts and our observations show a rather large discrepancy. Therefore we already know that there is something missing from the theory - it is incomplete, but not invalid.

Knowing why we have so little antimatter may plug this gap. Of course, the theory still won't be complete (quantum mechanics vs relativity, singularities, etc), it will be the best we have that fits the available facts. Sooner or later more facts will turn up. Fun times
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  #1148  
Old 18.11.2010, 13:17
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Yep CERN have trapped some Hydrogen Anti-matter

http://www.newscientist.com/article/...long-last.html

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ATOMS made of antimatter have been trapped for the first time, a feat that will allow us to test whether antimatter responds to the fundamental forces in the same way as regular matter.

Antiparticles are the oppositely charged twins of normal particles. Since matter and antimatter annihilate on contact, antimatter experiments have been limited to using charged antiparticles, which can be corralled within electromagnetic traps.

Several teams have made antihydrogen atoms in the past, but no one had managed to trap them for detailed experiments as they have no net charge. Now an experiment called the Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus (ALPHA) at the CERN particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, has finally managed to ensnare atoms of antihydrogen.
And the bit on why this is good news.

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ANTIMATTER has been around since the big bang 13.7 billion years ago, when theories say it was born in equal amounts as matter. But that equality no longer holds true, and ever since humans have been aware of antimatter, they have wondered why.
English physicist Paul Dirac came up with the idea of antimatter 79 years ago as he tried to reconcile quantum theory with special relativity. Dirac argued on theoretical grounds that antimatter had to exist. Detection of the positron in 1932 confirmed his theory. In this way, the positron was the first particle to be born out of pure thought, marking "perhaps the biggest jump of all the big jumps" of the 20th century, according to Werner Heisenberg, pioneer of quantum mechanics.
Now physicists have managed to create and trap antihydrogen atoms Studies of these newly ensnared anti-atoms will fire up the imaginations of Dirac's successors as they struggle to understand why antimatter is so rare. By the time we reach 2031, the centenary of Dirac's insight, perhaps we will have solved one of the great cosmic mysteries: where all that antimatter went, and why.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/...r-matters.html


My Questions:
How soon can I have my own warp drive?
Does this mean Dan Brown has actually made Science fact?
Why is no one upset at the treatment of these atoms? - FREE THE ANTI-MATTER PARTICLES.
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  #1149  
Old 28.11.2010, 23:08
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Antimatter caught, for 1 sixth of a second ...

will the big bang theory soon be proven invalid?
This paper doesn't invalidate it but definitely adds some evidence to the the mix:

Caveat: paper is published in arXiv but not yet reviewed. Penrose however is a respected researcher and worth paying attention to.

They theorized that concentric circles would be caused in the Cosmic Microwave background (this thing
)
from repeated cycles of "big bangs", which would be found around the collisions of super-massive black holes (found in the centres of galaxies) causing gravitational radiation bursts (gravity waves).

Their analysis found these as low temperature features around galactic clusters where these collisions would occur:

Not sure how enhanced this picture is though.

Here's the links to the abstract and full paper
http://arxiv.org/abs/1011.3706
http://arxiv.org/pdf/1011.3706v1

The proposal is that we've been through several cycles of "big bangs", each one revealed by a circular cold area.

Also, here's a lecture on the theory from 2009. I've only watched the first few minutes so far but it starts well
http://smartech.gatech.edu/bitstream...tml?sequence=5


See, fun times

Last edited by ali_the_nomad; 28.11.2010 at 23:30.
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  #1150  
Old 10.12.2010, 09:03
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Question: Why does the remote control to unlock the car doors only work when the car is wet?
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  #1151  
Old 10.12.2010, 09:32
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Question: Why does the remote control to unlock the car doors only work when the car is wet?
...because either your remote control needs new batteries or the receptor is defective I would assume.
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  #1152  
Old 10.12.2010, 10:33
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Is this when it rains or after the car has been washed?

Agreeing with LIB -change the batteries in the remote.

I would say that the car being wet results in improves the characteristics of the receiving antenna within the car so it can pick up a weaker signal.
Changing the batteries should fix this.

Or:

Where do you put your remote? (if that's not too personal)?

It may be that when the car is wet, after rain, the air temperature is actually warmer than when it is not raining (at this time of year) and so the batteries have not been affected by the cold so much.

Again, change the batteries.
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  #1153  
Old 10.12.2010, 19:41
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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...because either your remote control needs new batteries or the receptor is defective I would assume.
Make sure that you have new battery before removing the old one. Leaving a battery out can lose the programming for the lock. This can be expensive. My garage in UK warned me about this and said it would be 120 to re-programme
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  #1154  
Old 08.04.2011, 11:50
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Ask a Statistican, then Ask a Scientist, then Ask the Old Woman On The Corner

To the statisticians amongst us:
  • Roughly what numerical probability does a "compelling hint" come in at?


To the particle physicists amongst us:
  • Given that there's still no signs of that pesky Higgs Boson (despite the very positive previous news) and the latest news from the Tevatron team at Fermilab is that
"Researchers at the Tevatron formally announced compelling hints of a never-before-seen particle, specifically, a 'completely new, unanticipated particle' that researchers say cannot be the much sought-after Higgs boson, and is not one that is included in the Standard Model."
in the words of the Cosmic Bingo Caller, "Is anybody sweating?"


To The Old Woman On The Corner:
  • How do those pesky wee fundamental particles acquire mass?
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  #1155  
Old 08.04.2011, 12:03
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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To the statisticians amongst us:
  • Roughly what numerical probability does a "compelling hint" come in at?
Rough probability of a "compelling hint": 0.35.

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To the particle physicists amongst us:
  • Given that there's still no signs of that pesky Higgs Boson (despite the very positive previous news) and the latest news from the Tevatron team at Fermilab is that
"Researchers at the Tevatron formally announced compelling hints of a never-before-seen particle, specifically, a 'completely new, unanticipated particle' that researchers say cannot be the much sought-after Higgs boson, and is not one that is included in the Standard Model."
in the words of the Cosmic Bingo Caller, "Is anybody sweating?"

Oh, in relation to the not-the-Higgs Boson particle? Then the probability associated with that "compelling hint" depends on whether the scientists are talking to you or me (in which case it's 0.00000152), or to the committee funding further research (0.92).

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To The Old Woman On The Corner:
  • How do those pesky wee fundamental particles acquire mass?
Don't ask me, you're the one with the hotline to His Papal Excellency, and if anyone knows anything about mass, it's him.
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  #1156  
Old 08.04.2011, 23:09
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Re: Ask a Scientist

hi, im a Biomedical Scientist.
i think this thread is excellent. good idea!

let me know if you have any medical laboratory related questions. thats results from blood tests your not sure about or would like a bit of explanation on.

my speciallty is Clinical Biochemistry/Immunology/Haematology.
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  #1157  
Old 09.04.2011, 09:55
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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hi, im a Biomedical Scientist.
i think this thread is excellent. good idea!

let me know if you have any medical laboratory related questions. thats results from blood tests your not sure about or would like a bit of explanation on.

my speciallty is Clinical Biochemistry/Immunology/Haematology.
Great: Why is it taking the doping scientists so long to get a test for autologous blood doping up and running? Reinjecting your own blood is great way of increasing the haematocrit just before a cycle race, for instance . But my Googling suggests that stored blood changes in lots of easily detectable ways, e.g. using flow cytometry. An australian haematologist who works with WADA told me years ago that a test would be ready for the Peking Olympics. We're still waiting & the professional cylists are still getting away with it. Why?
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  #1158  
Old 09.04.2011, 16:13
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Great: Why is it taking the doping scientists so long to get a test for autologous blood doping up and running? Reinjecting your own blood is great way of increasing the haematocrit just before a cycle race, for instance . But my Googling suggests that stored blood changes in lots of easily detectable ways, e.g. using flow cytometry. An australian haematologist who works with WADA told me years ago that a test would be ready for the Peking Olympics. We're still waiting & the professional cylists are still getting away with it. Why?
1. the time between each cell cycle varies from athlete to athlete (related very closely to the metabolic rate) and so there is risk of intracellular haemolysis.

2. scientists are still trying to identify genes associated with the human muscle

3. when a test is designed it undergoes a lengthy procedure through clinical trials. this is usually from phase 1 to phase 4. if pre-clinical toxicity testing is proving to be a costly and a life threatening phase, then i think maybe this is one of the reasons as to why nothing has come up yet.

i hope that helps
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  #1159  
Old 07.06.2011, 14:27
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Lou 1 - 0 Chemistry Teacher

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/06...16_recognised/

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Many years ago in a Chemistry class while at high school I had an argument with my chem teacher about the periodic table. She insisted it was complete and there would never be any more elements to add to it whereas I said there was no way she could know that as she could not predict what new scientific discoveries we will have in the future. Which side do you take in this argument?
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  #1160  
Old 09.06.2011, 04:11
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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You really had this discussion?
I feel sorry for you teacher for being so wrong.
I mean as long as there are numbers left in the periodic table there are possibilities that there will be new elements tha account for these numerical identifiers.
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