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  #121  
Old 20.10.2007, 16:12
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Something tells me that different members are taking this threads with a different degree of seriousness. In any case, here is a wikipedia article that I just found

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universe_expansion

A lot of those articles have been at least looked over by people that know the stuff. It makes me wonder, perhaps we should ask questions not explained on wikipedia and then it would make sense to post or improve explanations there (I have no personal interests in wikipedia, but I think it's a great thing that it happened).

An unrelated thing, since there was talks about phenomena in liquids. To what extent are people using numerical simulations for this? Of course, even for this there is an article

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_model

which prevents me from asking too many questions until I read it. But I'm curious if anyone is actually using such simulations. (When I was a kid I was playing with a simplistic 2 dimensional matrix simulation where cell looks at its near neighbors. To my despair, the water would never drop no matter what I did. I could get individual molecules stick to walls and each other, but nothing like surface tension. Though for one thing, the water cluster sizes I was using were probably waaay too course, so I could get the thing running in real time on an Intel 386 ).

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I glad such universe expansion will have other such benefits for the swiss community to warrant further research, beyond the neighbours being forced further away....

dave
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  #122  
Old 20.10.2007, 16:45
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I know that many of you are dying to finally get all of their existential questions concerning trees - and tree rings in particular - answered, so go ahead and shoot!
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  #123  
Old 20.10.2007, 17:05
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Questions:

1) How many people that wanted to be a tree ever succeeded ?
2) How do the rings affect the physical properties of the wood (eg shear strength)

dave

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I know that many of you are dying to finally get all of their existential questions concerning trees - and tree rings in particular - answered, so go ahead and shoot!
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  #124  
Old 20.10.2007, 19:28
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Here's a toughie- How do dogs sense epeileptic fits. I think that it is more than just a changre in smell or behaviour if the person about to have the fit. I think that there is something that connects people, like how do I instinctively know when a guy is behind me checking out my glutes? How do Fish instinctively swim in a tight shoal? But seriously, how do dogs sense fits?
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  #125  
Old 20.10.2007, 19:46
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Something I've never found an answer for: Why, when doing hydrothermal chemistry, if you've made a good product, there's a slight vacuum when you open the teflon liner, but if there's nothing interesting, there isn't.
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  #126  
Old 21.10.2007, 16:18
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Why if I have been overexerting my self in exercise, do I ache not immediately, but he next day or day after? I feel like i've been on a stretching rack.

No-one cares about my muscles so I've had to find the answer myself-huh! Here it is for anyone who is alos suffering:

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/16/he...on/16sore.html

Last edited by Verena Scherer; 21.10.2007 at 17:43. Reason: Answering own question
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  #127  
Old 21.10.2007, 16:59
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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I know that many of you are dying to finally get all of their existential questions concerning trees - and tree rings in particular - answered, so go ahead and shoot!
I've heard Redwoods can grow far from water sources and they develop by utilising the roots of a neighbouring tree, in effect causing a chain of trees all feeding off each other. Is this Socialism or Cannabalism?
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  #128  
Old 21.10.2007, 17:19
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Nutritionally speaking. how much fat is there in the following:
  1. 100 grams butter?
  2. 100 grams olive oil?
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  #129  
Old 21.10.2007, 17:27
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Nutritionally speaking. how much fat is there in the following:
  1. 100 grams butter?
  2. 100 grams olive oil?
That's an old trick question and you know it!
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  #130  
Old 21.10.2007, 18:00
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Re: Ask a Scientist

100 grams butter

60 grams saturated fat
26 grams Mono-unsaturated fat
5 grams Poly-unsaturated fat
5 grams Trans-fat

100 grams olive oil

13 grams saturated fat
72 grams Mono-unsaturated fat
8 grams Poly-unsaturated fat
0 grams Trans-fat

Enjoy butter. You won't need to save so much for old age.
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  #131  
Old 21.10.2007, 19:11
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Enjoy butter. You won't need to save so much for old age.
My Granny's 96 and a half. She says what Whiskey and Butter can't cure, there's no cure for.

And she should know
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  #132  
Old 21.10.2007, 19:29
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Enjoy butter. You won't need to save so much for old age.
I do enjoy butter, but use it sparingly.

Except for the Plum Crumble I made last week. Now that was yummy...
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  #133  
Old 21.10.2007, 19:30
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I say that an AP Chemistry student should memorize the periodic table. Others say that memorizing the table it is a waste of time, they need to know the basic elements and their characteristics. I was made to memorize it.

Who's right?
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  #134  
Old 21.10.2007, 19:40
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I memorised it, passed my A level Chemistry exam, and then rapidly forgot it.
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  #135  
Old 21.10.2007, 20:01
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Re: Ask a Scientist

B***er that - I'm a transition metal-type chap and I can't remember anything other than the first row of those...

You don't have to remember it nowadays as the exam halls have a large one on the wall and they usually give you a copy in exams. I can't see the point of memorising the whole thing as you'll rarely ever have to know more than a few bits of it off by heart when you're actually using it. More important are what solvents do what, electronegativities, etc - really important relationships.
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  #136  
Old 21.10.2007, 20:46
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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I'm a transition metal-type chap and I can't remember anything other than the first row of those...
Tom Lehrer had this little ditty as an aide memoire:

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  #137  
Old 21.10.2007, 21:36
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Memorization is a tool that 'teachers' employ when they don't know how to teach. Fundamental understanding of basic principles and concepts should always be the method employed if you want to teach science and have your students understand or retain anything.

Rote memorization should be a thing of the past. A good teacher actually teaches and doesn't just give a list of things for their students to memorize.

Memorizing the periodic table is stupid and I'm guessing your chemistry teacher didn't understand much chemistry.

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I say that an AP Chemistry student should memorize the periodic table. Others say that memorizing the table it is a waste of time, they need to know the basic elements and their characteristics. I was made to memorize it.

Who's right?
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  #138  
Old 21.10.2007, 21:46
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I disagree completely. Memorisation is a key element (sic) in learning, and with the new right-on teaching methods of the 1970s failed me and others when learning mathematics by teaching multiple methods without any reinforcement.

Certain things IMO need to be memorised, building blocks as the foundation which to hang the relationships and analysis.

Times tables
Musical scales
magic numbers
periodic table
hierarchies
algebra
trigonometry
+++

are simple examples, although this also applies to techniques and methods. Obviously learning by rote has limitations and does not in itself bring understanding, but is a key element of recall for practical use.

dave

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Rote memorization should be a thing of the past. A good teacher actually teaches and doesn't just give a list of things for their students to memorize.
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  #139  
Old 21.10.2007, 22:11
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Certain things IMO need to be memorised, building blocks as the foundation which to hang the relationships and analysis.

Times tables
Musical scales
magic numbers
periodic table
hierarchies
algebra
trigonometry
+++


dave
On the one hand, I agree that a times table is something most people need to remember every day, and once learnt, it stays in memory. On the other hand, I can't imagine who would need to know the entire periodical table. What use is that to anyone ? (Unless your'e going to sing that song as a party piece.) It's like learning all the smiley codes to save you having to click a link to look them up.
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  #140  
Old 21.10.2007, 22:25
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I am not a chemist , but surely you should know your palette ? It's not difficult to learn surely and has ongoing relevance to the practice of your chemistry ?

Visualising the relationships a key route to understanding, and correct me if I am wrong but the layout and structure of the periodic table does have some significance ? I am having difficulty believing that not learning the periodic table if advocating advanced chemistry study can be a good thing...

Using a music analogy, I don't need to learn the structure of chords and their formation from scale tones in order to play guitar, but a knowledge of their construction takes my understanding to a new level, even if the real-time recall is not considered.

The approach of many musicians is to learn the shapes by rote and as their knowledge develops, to superimpose their understanding of the structure on top of this. If I happen to have a guitar with me when I see you, I can explain better.

dave



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On the one hand, I agree that a times table is something most people need to remember every day, and once learnt, it stays in memory. On the other hand, I can't imagine who would need to know the entire periodical table. What use is that to anyone ? (Unless your'e going to sing that song as a party piece.) It's like learning all the smiley codes to save you having to click a link to look them up.
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