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  #1501  
Old 04.11.2013, 17:00
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I've heard of this, supposedly it makes them taste better I think I'd have a similar reaction to yours.

AFAIK, plastics do change when heated and can leach into your foods. Some storage and food containers are designed to be safe even when heated or frozen, but I've never heard of a plastic bag for hot dogs being safe. Any chemists want to elaborate?
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  #1502  
Old 04.11.2013, 19:00
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Okay, I have a question...


Am I over-reacting?
No. The plastic leaches toxins (esters, plasticizers, phthalates, etc), right into the food. But then again, it's a hot dog. There's some crazy shit in there for sure also!

Phthalates have been linked with decreased testicular development in adolescent boys. it's true. Tell hubby that! problem solved....
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  #1503  
Old 04.11.2013, 20:04
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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No. The plastic leaches toxins (esters, plasticizers, phthalates, etc), right into the food. But then again, it's a hot dog. There's some crazy shit in there for sure also!

Phthalates have been linked with decreased testicular development in adolescent boys. it's true. Tell hubby that! problem solved....
1) Esters are not toxic, as far as I know. Many of them occur naturally in plants, e.g. ethyl butyrate is the key component of strawberry flavor.
2) Phthalates are not used as plasticizers in food packaging. Mostly plastics that do not need plasticizers (softening molecules) at all are used.

That's a quick summary from what I know already + a short Google, not the last word, so I'd be happy to hear any other opinions.

I do not think hubby's reproductive organs are going to disappear after a few boiled-in-the-bag hotdogs. Let me know if I'm wrong .
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  #1504  
Old 04.11.2013, 20:37
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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1) Esters are not toxic, as far as I know. Many of them occur naturally in plants, e.g. ethyl butyrate is the key component of strawberry flavor.
2) Phthalates are not used as plasticizers in food packaging. Mostly plastics that do not need plasticizers (softening molecules) at all are used.

That's a quick summary from what I know already + a short Google, not the last word, so I'd be happy to hear any other opinions.

I do not think hubby's reproductive organs are going to disappear after a few boiled-in-the-bag hotdogs. Let me know if I'm wrong .
Okay, I misspoke. I was referring to phthalic acid esters, which are used as plasticizers in plastic. Not used for food packaging? I'm not sure, but they're at least used for drug packaging:

Migration of 16 phthalic acid esters from plastic drug packaging to drugs

Also, phthalates find their way into many other types of plastic (like regular PET bottles, for example) when things get jumbled up in the recycling process.

The thought was not that the husband would be worried that his balls would fall off, but that his 2 year old son's wouldn't develop fully.
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  #1505  
Old 04.11.2013, 22:36
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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The thought was not that the husband would be worried that his balls would fall off, but that his 2 year old son's wouldn't develop fully.
Lol. Exactly!

I know that some plastics are designed to safely withstand high temperatures (e.g. BPA -- baby bottles, etc.), but I just can't imagine that these hot dog wrappers are composed of that type of plastic. I'd never heard of anyone boiling hot dogs while still inside the wrapper until I first saw my (Swiss) husband doing it. I'm done having kids, so I don't really care if his balls fall off (), but I certainly don't like the idea of my little boy potentially ingesting melted plastic.
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  #1506  
Old 09.12.2013, 17:12
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I feel utterly stupid asking this, but...

When you look into a mirror, is the image 3D?

I've given myself good reasons for both "yes" and "no" answers, but can't decide which is right.

"No" - It's a plane, innit? And there's never going to be anything pointing out of it.

"Yes" - Your eyes see different perspectives, it's like looking out of a window dumbass!


(I'm not very good at "seeing" depth in 3D films on the telly either, so I can't just say what I see)
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  #1507  
Old 09.12.2013, 17:16
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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I feel utterly stupid asking this, but...

When you look into a mirror, is the image 3D?
No "image" is inherently 3D. It's only the brain processing images from two sources that recomposes them into a composite image which we think of as 3D. As such, yes, an image in a mirror is every bit as 3D as if you were looking at another person through a window. your eyes are detecting separate images from slightly different angles giving exactly the same binocular effect as without a mirror.

To make sense of it, close one eye, then close the other. You get two different images, right. Now do the same looking in the mirror. Do you still get a different image per eye? Yes, you do.

Edit: I might add, compare this with looking at a flat printed picture - the images received by the two eyes will be effectively identical, as the different angles of the two will not give any different perspective, so we view it as 2d, not 3.

Last edited by Ace1; 09.12.2013 at 18:19.
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  #1508  
Old 09.12.2013, 18:06
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Ace is 100% correct. I might just add that when we talk about "seeing", it means that little black whole in your eye collects all the ray of lights that reflect back from objects. Your brain then makes an image of it.

When you say "3D" is when you have 2 eyes, so they collect slightly different rays and then your brain matches the images from your two eyes, thus creating a more "plastic", 3D image.



When the mirror comes into play: the mirror reflects evertyhing back exactly as it arrives to it. So all those rays of lights that your eyes were collecting are coming right back at you but from the mirror (albeit in a different "order"). But you get everything back into you eyes.
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  #1509  
Old 22.12.2013, 16:22
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Time for another question, this time about mushy peas...

We've got some peas soaking, in preparation for Christmas dinner. The dried peas need to be soaked for 24 hours with a soaking tablet, before they can be cooked. What purpose does the soaking tablet (sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate) have? Is there some particular chemical reaction that takes place in the peas when the soaking tablet is used? What happens if the soaking tablet is not used?
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  #1510  
Old 22.12.2013, 16:57
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Time for another question, this time about mushy peas...

We've got some peas soaking, in preparation for Christmas dinner. The dried peas need to be soaked for 24 hours with a soaking tablet, before they can be cooked. What purpose does the soaking tablet (sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate) have? Is there some particular chemical reaction that takes place in the peas when the soaking tablet is used? What happens if the soaking tablet is not used?
I am absolutely not a scientist, so please feel free to ignore my views

I just thought on reading your question, that it may be to help keep the peas green during cooking, I have read of this being done for other green vegetables, that a pinch of bicarb will help the veg to keep their appealing colour somehow. Perhaps not using the tablet, they will cook into an unappealing gray or brown mass of gloop.
Another thought being, perhaps it helps with the digestion of the mushy peas, as some people can have tummy troubles with pulses. A lot of people I know, add bicarb to cheese fondue, maintaining it helps with the digestion of it, so perhaps there is a link in there somewhere.
Will be interested to see if there are other reasons as to why.
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  #1511  
Old 23.12.2013, 11:12
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Time for another question, this time about mushy peas...

We've got some peas soaking, in preparation for Christmas dinner. The dried peas need to be soaked for 24 hours with a soaking tablet, before they can be cooked. What purpose does the soaking tablet (sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate) have? Is there some particular chemical reaction that takes place in the peas when the soaking tablet is used? What happens if the soaking tablet is not used?
At first I assumed this had something to do with regulating osmosis, or balancing the pH for whatever reason......but I didn't know.


I consulted my good friend Wikipedia (of dubious scientific credibility) to find this little gem of info:

Quote:
Sodium bicarbonate is often added to soften the peas to enhance the colour and to inhibit fermentation during soaking, which reduces later flatulence in consuming said foods.
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  #1512  
Old 06.06.2014, 12:43
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Why am I being sunburnt through a window pane? It's a very old one.
I also remember my one arm and shoulder tanning through a car window. I don't like this, I am not sure why I always assume glass will protect.
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  #1513  
Old 06.06.2014, 12:59
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I suppose it has a similar effect of burning paper with a magnifying glass. Well that happened when I was a kid if the sun was shining.
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  #1514  
Old 06.06.2014, 20:15
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why am I being sunburnt through a window pane? It's a very old one.
I also remember my one arm and shoulder tanning through a car window. I don't like this, I am not sure why I always assume glass will protect.
It depends on the glass. Different materials absorb different frequencies - glass is often transparent for visible light, and usually opaque for the higher frequency UV B (the cancer ones) but not so much for UV A (the skin aging ones, which I think are also the tanning ones).

Visible light has a lower frequency and larger wavelength than X-rays, then continuing on that direction there is UV As and then UV Bs (although I think the borders are often not very strictly defined, it is a continuum).

Straight from wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultravi...lass_filtering
Ordinary glass is partially transparent to UVA but is opaque to shorter wavelengths, whereas silica or quartz glass, depending on quality, can be transparent even to vacuum UV wavelengths. Ordinary window glass passes about 90% of the light above 350 nm, but blocks over 90% of the light below 300 nm.
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  #1515  
Old 06.06.2014, 20:18
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why am I being sunburnt through a window pane? It's a very old one.
I also remember my one arm and shoulder tanning through a car window. I don't like this, I am not sure why I always assume glass will protect.
I think you've answered your own question: Why should glass protect you from sunburn? Unless it's a special one that reflects UV light, then you'll burn just as easily through glass as outside. Oops a better answer arrived while I was typing.

No burning glass effect if the glass is flat. It has to be a lens that is thick in the middle and thin at the edges.

Last edited by FrankZappa; 06.06.2014 at 20:19. Reason: Beaten to the post
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  #1516  
Old 06.06.2014, 22:13
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Why am I being sunburnt through a window pane? It's a very old one.
I also remember my one arm and shoulder tanning through a car window. I don't like this, I am not sure why I always assume glass will protect.
If you have those spectacles that go dark in sunlight you will find that they do not darken in a car. The car glass absorbs these wavelengths. As you noticed the glass does not absorb all the wavelengths that cause tanning.
Of course you can order glass at a price that will absorb whatever you want to pay for!
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  #1517  
Old 06.06.2014, 22:34
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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I feel utterly stupid asking this, but...

When you look into a mirror, is the image 3D?

I've given myself good reasons for both "yes" and "no" answers, but can't decide which is right.
You don't have to consider perception of image and representation of reality as synonymous. You really don't. This is why you have two questions in front of a mirror, not one.

On top of it: perception is three dimensional only if you have two eyes. As soon as you only look through one eye, threedimensionality is an impossibility of perception.
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  #1518  
Old 09.06.2014, 08:54
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Excellent, thank yous.. I knew it was something to do with wave lengths but naively thought all glass that is produced to shield people from other elements, rain, wind, is automatically treated to block what probably more evil to us than anything. Hm. Bunch of smart cookies we got on board here, never disappointed.

Faltrad..love your train of thoughts. I wonder if people who have perceptual problems, or don't realize the role of our senses, have some concrete/abstract thinking differences, too..Most people are error/trial. How to advertise theory efficiently? Or maybe it shouldn't need to be promoted? Too much abstraction is evil but not enough will once kill humankind. Lofty, innit...
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  #1519  
Old 09.06.2014, 10:38
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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On top of it: perception is three dimensional only if you have two eyes. As soon as you only look through one eye, threedimensionality is an impossibility of perception.
As this is a "scientific" thread, I'd like to split a hair, or maybe add a contrivance. You could calculate depth with only one eye, provided you could perceive light phase and phase changes. You'd probably need a laser emitter attached to your forehead to provide the source of the phase. Images of sharks with mounted laser cannon spring to mind.

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  #1520  
Old 09.06.2014, 10:46
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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I think you've answered your own question: Why should glass protect you from sunburn? Unless it's a special one that reflects UV light, then you'll burn just as easily through glass as outside. Oops a better answer arrived while I was typing.
More likely to absorb UV than reflect it. Plexiglass does just that I think.

ObSomewhatRelated: Wikipedia reference-linkRichard_Feynman#Manhattan_Project

He immersed himself in work on the project, and was present at the Trinity bomb test. Feynman claimed to be the only person to see the explosion without the very dark glasses or welder's lenses provided, reasoning that it was safe to look through a truck windshield, as it would screen out the harmful ultraviolet radiation. On witnessing the blast, Feynman ducked towards the floor of his truck because of the immense brightness of the explosion, where he saw a temporary "purple splotch" afterimage of the event.[23]
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