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Guest 09.09.2009 10:30

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mel07 (Post 544325)
Since I was a kid I have always hated the expression "to keep your eyes peeled". I always got a mental image of a potato peeler across the eyeball.

Basically, I also have the mental image now and it is making me feel distinctly queer... :eek::msnsick: :D

Mel07 09.09.2009 10:38

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Basically, I also have the mental image now and it is making me feel distinctly queer... :eek::msnsick: :D
Welcome to my world:p.

Love the new avatar by the way. She's my hero. Practically perfect in every way.;)

22 yards 09.09.2009 10:46

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by argus (Post 540766)
I'm not quite sure if you're talking about beverages or sex. Anyway, here in CH, I'm a bit miffed when I ask for a Caffe Macchiato and the waiting staff will say in a condescending manner, "You mean a Latte Macchiato, don't you?" No, I don't. A Caffe Macchiato is coffee 'dirtied' with a bit of milk and a Latte Macchiato is milk 'dirtied' with a bit of coffee. :p

That annoys the cr@p out of me too. I even had a waiter telling me that what I wanted was an espresso with a dash of milk. No, numb nuts, I want a caffè macchiato ... like I just said. And I can't stan condescension from those who don't know what they're talking about!

22 yards 09.09.2009 10:48

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

People seem now to have dropped the word "sea" from their vocabulary and refer to every stretch of salty water as "ocean". Why?

I have heard this more and more over the summer: "We are going to Italy/South of France/Corfu to spend some time at the ocean."

Since when did the Mediterranean Sea (or Ionian Sea in the case of Corfu) get re-classed as an "ocean"? :confused:
Funnily enough, in Australia and the UK (at least, to my knowledge), it's the other way around -- we refer to the ocean as the sea. Just as you crest that final hill before getting to the beach, the kids in the back of the car shriek out "I see the sea!" And you always take a walk at the seaside, never the oceanside.

viosno 09.09.2009 10:59

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nasir (Post 540413)
Knowing that one or more seats next to a person are free, but asking
"ist der Platz noch frei"

But don't you think it's rude to just sit there without any such gesture.

sharkey 09.09.2009 11:01

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Addicting/Addictive? Anyone? Am I the only one that gets p!ssed off when I see this?


Other ones that I found more amusing were Uncanning (presumably the act of removing from cans) and Mind-goggling (not really sure about that one)

swissotter 09.09.2009 11:10

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
"my bad..."

22 yards 09.09.2009 11:14

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by swissotter (Post 544401)
"my bad..."

Heh heh ... like I said in your other thread, what does that mean anyway?

Guest 09.09.2009 11:16

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by 22 yards (Post 544406)
Heh heh ... like I said in my other thread, what does that mean anyway?

Having a quick look around the threads where it has been used it seems to have the sentiment "mea culpa" indicating some kind of mistake or oversight by the poster.

Writing "mea culpa" each time would look a bit pretentious, though, so perhaps "my bad" is the safer option... :D

22 yards 09.09.2009 11:20

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Having a quick look around the threads where it has been used it seems to have the sentiment "mea culpa" indicating some kind of mistake or oversight by the poster.

Writing "mea culpa" each time would look a bit pretentious, though, so perhaps "my bad" is the safer option... :D
"My mistake" is well-established!

mirfield 09.09.2009 11:50

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
I find I add stupid phrases when I'm in my "English for Foreigners" mode, without realising.

"For sure" and "absolutely" would probably get me slapped in my local pub. I really don't know why I use them because they don't make it any easier to be understood.



BTW, "English for Foreigners" isn't meant to denigrate. It just means me slipping out of broad Yorkshire and into something a little more neutral.

Brightonite 12.09.2009 15:35

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dervaish (Post 540116)
- When people say, "Oh you just want to have your cake and eat it too". Fking right! What good is a cake if you can't eat it?http://s.bebo.com/img/vid.gifhttp://s.bebo.com/img/vid.gifhttp://s.bebo.com/img/vid.gif

Quite right, this really is a stupid saying. However the original saying that it was mistranslated from was very wise.
A young Eskimo who got very cold whilst fishing in his little seal skin boat, put some blubber candles in the bottom of his vessel. The canoe caught fire and sank.
The Inuits now, sensibly say "You can't have your kayak and heat it" :msnnerd:

22 yards 12.09.2009 16:05

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Brightonite (Post 547434)
Quite right, this really is a stupid saying. However the original saying that it was mistranslated from was very wise.
A young Eskimo who got very cold whilst fishing in his little seal skin boat, put some blubber candles in the bottom of his vessel. The canoe caught fire and sank.
The Inuits now, sensibly say "You can't have your kayak and heat it" :msnnerd:

You're right, of course, that expression did originate with the Inuits. ;)

However, I believe the current English expression is actually slightly corrupted from "You can't keep your cake and eat it too" -- meaning you need to make up your mind whether to have something or to use it up -- you can't use something up and have it remain available for later on, as well.

I hope that clumsy expanation makes some sense.

Colonelboris 12.09.2009 16:10

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Most odd - wihout having seen this, I'd started a thread on this exact subject on the same day on another forum and most of the answers here are on there. Except for my two pet hates.
I say hates, I mean phrases that are so annoying that could snap the slouching spine of the cretinous dribbling morons that utter them.
"Cheer up, it might never happen." Oh, it might happen to you much sooner than you think, cocktard.
And, after making some inadvertant rhyming couplet: "I'm a poet and I didn't even know it!" Congratulations, you blethering imbecile.:firing:

BeastOfBodmin 12.09.2009 16:19

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PaddyG (Post 540152)
Also, people who end every phrase with an upward inflection, as if every bloody thing they say is a question. :mad:

That's usually done by North Americans, though it is spreading in England.

BeastOfBodmin 12.09.2009 16:23

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Confusing e.g. and i.e.

"I could care less" - I think that's an Americanism, which doesn't make sense, as it is supposed to convey how little someone cares about something. The English English version is "I couldn't care less", which does make sense.

Guest 12.09.2009 16:23

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BeastOfBodmin (Post 547448)
That's usually done by North Americans, though it is spreading in England.

That's how tonal languages develop! One minute you're confirming that the listener understands what you're on about, then next minute you're speaking Chinese!

Which would be fine, so long as we'd still be able to differentiate between **** and ****.

Which we probably wouldn't, so please let's not go there*.







* My contribution to this list of annoying expressions.

BeastOfBodmin 12.09.2009 16:24

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Which we probably wouldn't, so please let's not go there*.

* My contribution to this list of annoying expressions.
Dude, get with the program!

Colonelboris 12.09.2009 16:26

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
If I remember correctly, the upward inflection was certainly something of an Australian oddity, being often called the Australian Question Intonation. Strangely, none of my colleagues appear to suffer from this.

BeastOfBodmin 12.09.2009 16:31

Re: Stupid everyday expressions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Colonelboris (Post 547454)
If I remember correctly, the upward inflection was certainly something of an Australian oddity, being often called the Australian Question Intonation. Strangely, none of my colleagues appear to suffer from this.

Two people I know from Perth, and one from Sydney, do "suffer" from it.


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