Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Housing in general  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 15.04.2011, 10:56
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 3,848
Groaned at 78 Times in 57 Posts
Thanked 4,115 Times in 2,218 Posts
rainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond reputerainer_d has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Replacing wall-mounted radiators?

There are a lot of things to consider when doing "upgrades" on old houses (or thinking of buying one to do so).
First: purely electric heating will only make any (economic) sense, if the price of electricity is next to nothing - which is very unlikely to sustain even in the near future.
If you build a house today in Switzerland, it has to conform to the so called "MuKen09" standard (Mustervorschriften der Kantone im ENergiebereich)
This is an consensus of the different cantons reached in 2008 or so and that is in effect now even for the cantons with the longest transition period. It basically describes a certain insulation-level and maximum energy-consumption (in fuel-equivalent).
A house built to this standard is very well insulated and usually comes with an air-water heat-pump.
But you can minimize the overall energy-consumption a bit more: this is the so called Minergie (Minimal Engergie) standard.
The problem with a "normal" MuKEN09-house is that it is basically as airtight as a submarine.
If you renovate a an old house to new standards, the 2nd thing you'll notice (the first being the reduced energy-consumption) is that mold is coming up quickly if you don't open the windows regularly (several times a day for several minutes). In reality, especially during winter, this does not happen.
Those new, underfloor heat-pump heatings are low-temperature. They are not "hot", they are just a bit warmer than room-temperature.
As such, once you open the windows for a few minutes, it takes a while to re-"heat" the room.
For this reason, the Minergie-standard defines that you have to have a
(draft-free) ventilation-system with heat recuperation.
This system constantly exchanges the air in all rooms, but takes the heat in that air to warm-up the incoming air.
As a result, the "climate" in the house is (supposed to be) much better and you still save energy in contrast to just opening windows every other hour.
For a new house, everybody tells you to go Minergie.

Beyond Minergie, there is "Minergie P", which defines a house that takes a certain amount of the energy used to heat from renewable sources.
At current prices, a solar heating does not make any sense - electric energy or natural gasoline is too cheap, the break-even point would be beyond the lifetime of the system.
If the schedule by which nuclear power-plants are shut-down in Germany and here in Switzerland is accelerated, though, energy might become much more expensive quickly and all current calculation would be moot.

http://www.minergie.ch - some material is available in English, but most is in German.

Before you buy and old house, it is recommended to ask for the help of an expert. He can say how much money is needed to bring the house to the level you can afford.
The guy from the Minergie-booth at SVIT recommended this list:
http://www.forumenergie.ch/pub/docs/...gie_110310.pdf

It's really not worth investing (say) 0.75 million Francs for an old building and later learning that you need another .25.
It's probably the easiest to see it as just another investment - and to be a good investor, you have to take the emotions out of the decision making process....
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank rainer_d for this useful post:
  #22  
Old 15.04.2011, 11:05
AbFab's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 8,659
Groaned at 383 Times in 263 Posts
Thanked 13,030 Times in 4,457 Posts
AbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Replacing wall-mounted radiators?

As to the costs of electric heating - can't you ask for the previous bills? Heat pumps certainly run of a lower-cost electric meter, may this system does too.

As TiMow points out insulation is vital and may be deficient in an older property.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank AbFab for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Noise from radiators tesso Housing in general 15 15.12.2010 15:42
noise nuisance/pollution through wall mounted flat-screen tv of neighbors john_semour Complaints corner 17 05.04.2010 07:33


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 18:37.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0