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Old 29.07.2011, 14:25
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What is a Hochparterre?

Hi,

I am new to Switzerland looking for my first flat, and seem to have found a few places saying they are a 'Hochparterre'. One advert says it has no lift. Which makes me wonder can these Hochparteres be on any floor? or especially high up? I am hoping to find a place that is not too tricky to access so I don't want to waste anyone's time emailing for a viewing to an awkward flat .

My inital translation of the word yields 'mezzanine', which means a mid-floor? So could this could be anywhere in the building? Also I am unsure whether that is a good translation into English...

Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:30
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

I think it means half a flight up from street level. Lots of houses in Swiss towns don't have anything exactly on street level, but rather a floor that is a few stairs up and a floor that is a few stairs down from the road.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:35
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

I think this means that one side of the house is on the ground floor and the other side is the first floor. In Switzerland, seems they often cut into the hill rather than leveling the site.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:45
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

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I think it means half a flight up from street level.
correct



...................................
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:51
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?




Here is an example of a hochparterre (which is basically what others have explained). Basically the groundfloor is about 1 to 1.5 meters above street level. It is an efficient way to give groundfloors a little more privacy (windows are no longer completly at pedestrian height), extra protection from cold and humidity from earth/snow and it allows windows for the cellar.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:53
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

Cool, so is there a different name for the half flight up and half flight down ones? Or are they both a Hochparterre? Interesting that one ad mentioned not having a lift while the rest say nothing...


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I think it means half a flight up from street level. Lots of houses in Swiss towns don't have anything exactly on street level, but rather a floor that is a few stairs up and a floor that is a few stairs down from the road.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:57
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

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Cool, so is there a different name for the half flight up and half flight down ones? Or are they both a Hochparterre? Interesting that one ad mentioned not having a lift while the rest say nothing...
No, the Hochparterre is only what would normally be the ground floor (Hoch = high, parterre = par terre (fr.) = on the ground), but raised in the way described. If the "lower ground floor" is marketed as a flat, it may be called "Souterrain" ("sous terrain" (fr.) = under the ground).
Everything else is basement, 1st floor, etc as usual.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:57
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

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Cool, so is there a different name for the half flight up and half flight down ones? Or are they both a Hochparterre? Interesting that one ad mentioned not having a lift while the rest say nothing...
The flight down one might be a Tiefparterre or Souterrain, and generally considered less desirable than a Hochparterre. In many houses there isn't an apprtment there though, but a cellar where people can store their stuff plus a room for the communal washing machine called the Waschküche.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:57
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

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Cool, so is there a different name for the half flight up and half flight down ones? Or are they both a Hochparterre?
Half flight down is called "souterrain".


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It is an efficient way to give groundfloors a little more privacy (windows are no longer completly at pedestrian height), extra protection from cold and humidity from earth/snow and it allows windows for the cellar.
And you save on construcion cost, as you only have to dig a hole half as deep.
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Old 29.07.2011, 14:58
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

Oh cool So it's a ground floor that is higher than you might expect? Lol! Thanks to you all for such speedy and informative responses!
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Old 29.07.2011, 15:00
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

Lol! also for the information on the lower ground flats- I won't get floored if I encounter one of those now!!
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Old 29.07.2011, 16:38
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Re: What is a Hochparterre?

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I think this means that one side of the house is on the ground floor and the other side is the first floor. In Switzerland, seems they often cut into the hill rather than leveling the site.
This is very much the case where I live... the ground floor flat is a "Hochparterre" at the front (street side), but is actually the second floor out the back ! The hillside is so steep that there are two more flats below it, which are basically "underground" at the front but garden/first floor level at the back. They only have windows on one side of course.
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