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  #1381  
Old 10.04.2017, 13:33
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

Both ways (bed andhigh raised container beds) I cover the ground entirely about 2-3cm high and a little bit raised up around the plants. It is not a very thick layer overall, so that rain can go through and moisture evaporate too.

Now I have smaller containers on my balcony allotment, I just lay a small layer, more to help to keep moisture in, as I don't have a big enough sun store and the balcony gets full blast of sun rays, so the risk of the containers drying out is quite big.

Does this help?
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  #1382  
Old 10.04.2017, 13:42
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

I have made collars for my strawberries with some of that sticky matting people put on their draining sink board. Used a big saucer to draw around, then cut a big cross in the middle and take off a little bit of the centra material, then put around plant when young. I then weigh them down with small stones and bark- works really well. I'd seen similar ones for sale in the UK, but couldn't get any here- and it was much cheaper this way.

Does your Commune/Gemeinde re-distribute the compost they make with all the garden and veg refuse? Ours does it only once a year- and we went to get many huge bags of it (oh the weight!) - fab.


Very sad day for me here. The massive, healthy and sound maple in the Church grounds in front of our house was cut today. 500 years old today- planted when the Church was built in 1517- on the site of an earlier Church and an old pagan sacred site. They cut all the other trees in that corner- but I was able to get the Council to agree to preserve it- with the approval and vote at the Council. This morning they came at 7.30 and by the time I'd thrown some clothes on to go and stop them - that venerable giant came crashing down in front of my eyes.

A very very sad day for me- we still have many very old mature trees- but THAT one was my special friend- and I admired it every day- and it was always the first thing I saw in the morning when I opened the shutters. Disgusted- and not from Tunbridge sad
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  #1383  
Old 10.04.2017, 13:57
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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A very very sad day for me- we still have many very old mature trees- but THAT one was my special friend- and I admired it every day- and it was always the first thing I saw in the morning when I opened the shutters. Disgusted- and not from Tunbridge sad

I feel your pain, trees are sacred for me, the Pagan, too... and I was terribly upset last year when the maple (my favourite tree!)which I planted approx 20 years ago here, nurtured and cared for, was cut down to make place for a noise reducing wooden wall bacause of the new motorway being built here....they (the Canton) cut down our over 4meter high cherry laurel and the Lonicera hedge too...and that 2.40meter high wooden eyesore is a joke!! Unfortunately, the house owner (ex.hubby) didn't care at all and was only too glad to save on gardeners costs in futureand gave the go ahead.


I was lucky enough to get a warning just before they came to do the dastardly deed, got a lot of pics and cut off some leaves and have made now a framed collage of it.
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  #1384  
Old 10.04.2017, 14:20
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Very sad day for me here. The massive, healthy and sound maple in the Church grounds in front of our house was cut today. 500 years old today- planted when the Church was built in 1517- on the site of an earlier Church and an old pagan sacred site. They cut all the other trees in that corner- but I was able to get the Council to agree to preserve it- with the approval and vote at the Council. This morning they came at 7.30 and by the time I'd thrown some clothes on to go and stop them - that venerable giant came crashing down in front of my eyes.
They cut it down even though they had agreed to preserve it?

That would make me very angry indeed.
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  #1385  
Old 10.04.2017, 14:27
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

I've used dried grass clippings in the past, both for strawberries and as anti-weed mulch.

Tom
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  #1386  
Old 10.04.2017, 15:28
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

Good ideas, EE and Odile! Maybe i'll try different methods in different beds, see what happens this summer.

That's the great thing about gardening, it's a constant experiment. When something doesn't work out... Well, there's always next year.


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Very sad day for me here. The massive, healthy and sound maple in the Church grounds in front of our house was cut today. 500 years old today- planted when the Church was built in 1517- on the site of an earlier Church and an old pagan sacred site. They cut all the other trees in that corner- but I was able to get the Council to agree to preserve it- with the approval and vote at the Council. This morning they came at 7.30 and by the time I'd thrown some clothes on to go and stop them - that venerable giant came crashing down in front of my eyes.

A very very sad day for me- we still have many very old mature trees- but THAT one was my special friend- and I admired it every day- and it was always the first thing I saw in the morning when I opened the shutters. Disgusted- and not from Tunbridge sad

Cutting down a 500 year old tree, against a consevation order? That is a crime! I'm not normally one to rock the boat, but in such a case I'd be looking for heads to roll. Can you launch a complaint? It won't bring the tree back, but at least the dunderheads who cut it down might Get hit with a hefty enough fine to make them think twice before cutting doen the next one.

---

Seriously, what is it with the hatred of trees here?

Yes, I get it, a view of the lake adds half a gazillion to property values. But if your neighbor's tree was there when you bought, forcing them to cut it down after the fact is just not on.

My personal rant: Why oh why do people move out to the countryside 'for the green' and then cut down all the trees and concrete over the grass?

We need the trees, we need the shade they bring, we need intermittent green spaces.

As the planet continues to warm up, cutting down trees is astonishingly short sighted.
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  #1387  
Old 10.04.2017, 16:10
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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My personal rant: Why oh why do people move out to the countryside 'for the green' and then cut down all the trees and concrete over the grass?
Just to cheer everybody up over this one.

I have friends who have a farm in a small village in Hungary. that village is very much the picturebook Hungary that hasn't changed in the last 50 years where old ladies walk around in red headcloths (and some of them are actually really called Piroska) and chickens and geese roam the streets freely and if you're late for an appointment it may well be because you were stuck behind a horse and cart on a narrow country road. There are only two surnames in the village and there is hardly any crime and people don't lock their doors, but if somebody does break in, the stolen item may be a bar of soap or a box of teabags.

In other words, absolutely idyllic. And until some years ago the main problem in places like that was depopulation. Young people went to Budapest or abroad in search of big money, leaving only the old people behind. In the last couple of years that has reversed, with a lot of people in search of peace and serenity buying old houses dirt cheap and doing them up. A lot of these people come from Switzerland, Germany, The Netherlands, Belgium, Britain and such countries.

Well, it turned out that one of these new inhabitants, I won't say from which country, didn't realize that where there is serenity caused by chickens roaming around, there is also likely to be a rooster. Chickens may lay eggs ans also hatch them but the latter bit doesn't work without another component. And that component can wake you up at 4am. It turned out the good man called the police, and the village poilceman came to see him and asked what he was expecting him to do. Should he arrest the rooster?

That story made the rounds in the village for months afterwards and caused a lot of giggling and earned the policeman a good few free drinks in the village watering hole, and I hope the good man learnt a lesson.
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  #1388  
Old 10.04.2017, 17:55
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Cutting down a 500 year old tree, against a consevation order? That is a crime! I'm not normally one to rock the boat, but in such a case I'd be looking for heads to roll. Can you launch a complaint? It won't bring the tree back, but at least the dunderheads who cut it down might Get hit with a hefty enough fine to make them think twice before cutting doen the next one.
Our Maire is ... well it is best if I don't put it into print
And yes, it was put to the Council meeting that all the trees could be cut bar that 500 year old maple- and approved.

I shall be making some noise for sure - but for the tree, no noise or complaints will bring it back- and no planting of a new tree will replace it either

EastEnders- and yes- perhaps if they had come to warn me and discuss, knowing that I objected strongly to the plan to cut it, and had put an official objection which was presented to the Council meeting by my party (PLR) and voted + accepted- I would have had a chance to do something about it- and if unavoidable, go away for a few days whilst they did the deed. But to wake up at 7.30, to the deed done by the time I'd thrown clothes on and rushed there- was just too despicable and cowardly for words.
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  #1389  
Old 10.04.2017, 19:53
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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I've used dried grass clippings in the past, both for strawberries and as anti-weed mulch.

Tom
This i did with my potted raspberries in my then proper downstairs allotment, worked really well as kind of feed too. I gifted them to someone with a garden now, where I hope they thrive still
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Old 11.04.2017, 08:49
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What to plant under trampoline?

Any recommendations for something to plant under a trampoline? The grass doesn't grow that well under there; it's difficult to cut and becomes kind of patchy. It usually becomes a mud pit.

Some sort of low maintenance groundcover that will do well in shady/filtered sun area. We're at 1000 meters so it will need to survive sitting under snow for a couple of months each winter.

Thanks for any ideas.
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  #1391  
Old 11.04.2017, 09:07
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Re: What to plant under trampoline?

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Any recommendations for something to plant under a trampoline? The grass doesn't grow that well under there; it's difficult to cut and becomes kind of patchy. It usually becomes a mud pit.

Some sort of low maintenance groundcover that will do well in shady/filtered sun area. We're at 1000 meters so it will need to survive sitting under snow for a couple of months each winter.

Thanks for any ideas.
How much traffic does the area get? Do you need something for just the bit under the trampoline, or also the surrounding area?

My go-to groundcovers for shaded areas are vinca, ajuga, and volunteer Waldbeeren - but these are no good for an area you will be walking on.

If you can't get something to grow there, what about a wood mulch?
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Old 11.04.2017, 09:16
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

Much as I hate artificial turf, that's what we had under our trampoline. Just hoovered it occasionally.
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  #1393  
Old 11.04.2017, 09:17
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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In other words, absolutely idyllic. And until some years ago the main problem in places like that was depopulation. Young people went to Budapest or abroad in search of big money, leaving only the old people behind. In the last couple of years that has reversed, with a lot of people in search of peace and serenity buying old houses dirt cheap and doing them up. A lot of these people come from Switzerland, Germany, The Netherlands, Belgium, Britain and such countries.
Sounds like home. The funny thing is that Westerns are so surprised that there are still people living like that, they are looking for stuff like this and the local youth are all looking for something else - cement, more cement and...traffic.
My parents own a property in one of these idylic villages as a consequence of restitutio in integrum laws (all the properties confiscated by the communist regime were given back). There I really have space, something I will never be able to buy here.


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My personal rant: Why oh why do people move out to the countryside 'for the green' and then cut down all the trees and concrete over the grass?

We need the trees, we need the shade they bring, we need intermittent green spaces.

As the planet continues to warm up, cutting down trees is astonishingly short sighted.
My guess is because it gets really muddy. You can notice the same phenomenon even in Italy and you can't even compare the climate...
And I don't think people are moving out only for the "green", rather for more space, peacefulness and privacy.

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Old 11.04.2017, 10:03
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Sounds like home. The funny thing is that Westerns are so surprised that there are still people living like that, they are looking for stuff like this and the local youth are all looking for something else - cement, more cement and...traffic.
Maybe when the local youth grows a bit older and begins to understand there is more to life that money and concrete, they too may rediscover the villages of the grandparents and return there and invest some of their money there. I very much hope so.
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  #1395  
Old 11.04.2017, 10:05
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Re: What to plant under trampoline?

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How much traffic does the area get? Do you need something for just the bit under the trampoline, or also the surrounding area?

My go-to groundcovers for shaded areas are vinca, ajuga, and volunteer Waldbeeren - but these are no good for an area you will be walking on.

If you can't get something to grow there, what about a wood mulch?
It would be for under the trampoline only so the foot traffic would just be from the dog.

The vinca could work but my only hesitation is the required number of plants to get decent coverage. They are kind of slow spreading in other parts of our garden but maybe you can recommend a better variety than what I have been using? I've purchased the standard vinca from COOP B&H in previous years. It grows well but spreads slowly.

I'm not familiar with the ajuga but after googling it, it looks similar to some stuff growing around the house. Any particular variety?

Wood mulch would be perfect except for the dog. He's not much of a digger but when he has access to wood mulch/chips, he gets curious and then it becomes a muddy mess.
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  #1396  
Old 11.04.2017, 11:04
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Re: What to plant under trampoline?

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The vinca could work but my only hesitation is the required number of plants to get decent coverage. They are kind of slow spreading in other parts of our garden but maybe you can recommend a better variety than what I have been using? I've purchased the standard vinca from COOP B&H in previous years. It grows well but spreads slowly.
Hmmm... vinca does take time to start to fill out. My neighbor planted a slope in vinca, mixing colors, fairly sparsely three years ago. It's now a gorgeous thick cover. In the first year she mulched heavily (the woodchip thing again) so it looked 'finished' even when the plants were young.

I don't know of any varieties that grow faster. And planting thickly can be a problem down the line, when the spreading plants start to choke each other.

Could you start with vinca planted sparsely and add in some annuals or perennials to fill until it spreads?

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I'm not familiar with the ajuga but after googling it, it looks similar to some stuff growing around the house. Any particular variety?
I prefer the green-leafed ajugas when mixed with a grassy area, but for some reason these seem harder to find here, outside a specialty garden center. The purple leafed varieties seem to pop up in Coop B/H or Hornbach regularly. You might try whichever you can find locally and cheaply, see what takes off. (Buy cheap and see what happens is generally my motto when looking for a ground cover, thanks to the Thundering Herd.)

The variegated ajuga, a gorgeous green/pink/white leafed variety, needs more sun, and likely won't work under the trampoline. (Beautiful elsewhere in the garden, though.)


What about pachysandra? I have some that grows well in shade. Same speed of spreading issue with vinca, though. Once it takes off, however, it fills very nicely.

Or lady's mantle? Mine seems to be quite hardy in a shade border, coming back even when OH hits it occasionally with the lawnmower.
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Old 11.04.2017, 11:32
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

Another thought: How desperate are you?

I have a problem shady slope; the dogs race up and down constantly, I've tried just about everything, from grass to ground covers, still a muddy mess. Few plants took, those that did succumbed to the Thundering Herd.

Well, one season when other demands on my time kept me from weeding my garden as I should, the weed that is the bane of a Swiss lawn started to take over that spot:

Scharbockskraut:

http://www.gartendatenbank.de/wiki/ranunculus-ficaria

It's not a bad looking plant if you like things natural - low growing lighter green leaves, little yellow flowers in the spring. As I have decided that the way to remain sane while gardening here is to redefine all weeds as wildflowers, I'm not bothered.

BUT BUT BUT

It's insanely invasive. Seriously. It spreads like wildfire, and if allowed to reach critical mass will choke out other grasses.

Nonetheless it was the answer to my problem slope, I no longer have a mud trail. The slope is more or less covered, and certainly less messy. OH just mows over it as he cuts the lawn.

BUT BUT BUT

Do not even consider giving it free reign if you are anything less than desperate. And even if desperate, consider bordering the area to try to keep it contained.
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Old 11.04.2017, 11:39
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Another thought: How desperate are you?

I have a problem shady slope; the dogs race up and down constantly, I've tried just about everything, from grass to ground covers, still a muddy mess. Few plants took, those that did succumbed to the Thundering Herd.

Well, one season when other demands on my time kept me from weeding my garden as I should, the weed that is the bane of a Swiss lawn started to take over that spot:

Scharbockskraut:

http://www.gartendatenbank.de/wiki/ranunculus-ficaria

It's not a bad looking plant if you like things natural - low growing lighter green leaves, little yellow flowers in the spring. As I have decided that the way to remain sane while gardening here is to redefine all weeds as wildflowers, I'm not bothered.

BUT BUT BUT

It's insanely invasive. Seriously. It spreads like wildfire, and if allowed to reach critical mass will choke out other grasses.

Nonetheless it was the answer to my problem slope, I no longer have a mud trail. The slope is more or less covered, and certainly less messy. OH just mows over it as he cuts the lawn.

BUT BUT BUT

Do not even consider giving it free reign if you are anything less than desperate. And even if desperate, consider bordering the area to try to keep it contained.
I guess it spreads primarily through root tubers rather than seeding?

If so, have you considered protecting the rest of your garden by installing rhizome barriers of the type you would also use to control bamboo? I guess you wouldn't need to bury it to the same depth and could thus cut the barrier into two or three by cutting lengthways, thus also saving on the amount of digging you need to do?
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Old 11.04.2017, 11:50
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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I guess it spreads primarily through root tubers rather than seeding?

If so, have you considered protecting the rest of your garden by installing rhizome barriers of the type you would also use to control bamboo? I guess you wouldn't need to bury it to the same depth and could thus cut the barrier into two or three by cutting lengthways, thus also saving on the amount of digging you need to do?
Yes, it spreads by tubers.

My garden is small enough that I can keep it out of unwanted areas by weeding; Scharbockskraut is very shallow, easily pulled up if it starts to invade a mulched bed. There are days when I get into the zen of weeding.

But if it gets the better of me I'll need to do some sort of bordering around the beds as you suggest. Added to the to-do list, some day when I have the time.

I've come to rather like the look as it naturalizes here and there in the lawn, though. My take on a lawn - if it's green and the good Lord allowed it to find it's way here, who am I to say otherwise? Bloom where ye are planted. Dandelions excepted. Still a Midwesterner after all these years.
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Old 11.04.2017, 12:45
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

Was at the garden centre yesterday and thought about that slope. It really needs other plants to fill in the gaps. It will look much nicer, stop weeds, and give colour when the periwinckles have finished (vinca).

You could plant some creeping rosemary- also blue flowers but later- and of course the gorgeous smell of rosemary and plenty for the kitchen.

There is another creeper- sdaly the name escapes me, which has variegated green, yellow and orange leaves ... name will come back to me, or perhaps someone else would remember ...

Edit: here it is houttuynia cordata chameleon - it's gorgeous.

Otherwise you could try bright silver with very finely cut leaves- and the smell will put off mosquitoes - artemisia NANA (othere artemisia will grow far too tall) - it is a type of wormood.

Or creeping thyme in blue - perhaps with the rosemary- great smell and great for beas- or a mixture of the 3 with artemisia nana.

Also the ground cover sedum - with yellow flowers (other types of sedum are erect)- or bugle (ajuga) reddish leaves with blue flowers from early summer to late autunm- or Alchemilla, with those lovely leaves and tiny green flowers, and that due drop in the middle for insects and birds.
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