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  #1541  
Old 18.01.2018, 14:17
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

These things? Obi

PS: Can they be planted outside? Or are they only indoor plants? And if yes, do they survive the winter?
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  #1542  
Old 18.01.2018, 14:24
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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These things? Obi

PS: Can they be planted outside? Or are they only indoor plants? And if yes, do they survive the winter?
Sempervivum specifically are mountain plants and easily survive a winter here outside but they like sun and good drainage.

Some of the others in your link need warmer conditions
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  #1543  
Old 18.01.2018, 15:11
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

We didn't get our roses pruned back this fall. Can we do it in winter without hurting the plants? Early spring? Wait till they've bloomed again next summer?

For that matter is fall even the right time to be doing it normally? It's what we've done the last 3 years and it seems to agree with them but what I don't know about roses would fill a dictionary.

There are 2 rosebushes, different varieties, came with our house so I have no idea what either of them is called. They're both climbers - I think? They don't cling like ivy does but they grow up the wall and are about 8 feet tall. They both bloom on their new growth, rebloom throughout the summer (one much more than the other) and are very fragrant. I can hunt up a picture if it's any help....
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  #1544  
Old 18.01.2018, 15:55
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Animal welfare & husbandry laws are much stricter in CH than across the border- hence the higher price point. If you care about their welfare maybe it’s best to buy locally within CH. Look at the FSVO website for more info.
HAHAHAHAHA! Thanks for the laugh. It is too funny to even groan at you. Next time, you feel like being that sanctimonious, just take a deep breath and a step back to understand the context. I have to be stark raving mad to talk about feathery hens being on display at a flower shop, in a bowl, no less!
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  #1545  
Old 18.01.2018, 16:04
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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These things? Obi

PS: Can they be planted outside? Or are they only indoor plants? And if yes, do they survive the winter?
Thank you for the link. As Tom says, there are some local varieties which are totally winter resistant. We had some in our previous place, growing out of nooks and crannies and rock crevices. Some of them had just beautiful thick leaves and some of them would bloom gorgeous flowers in summer and hibernate entire winter. But, I can't really tell which one is which. I will keep them indoors just to be safe.
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  #1546  
Old 18.01.2018, 16:17
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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We didn't get our roses pruned back this fall. Can we do it in winter without hurting the plants? Early spring? Wait till they've bloomed again next summer?

For that matter is fall even the right time to be doing it normally? It's what we've done the last 3 years and it seems to agree with them but what I don't know about roses would fill a dictionary.

There are 2 rosebushes, different varieties, came with our house so I have no idea what either of them is called. They're both climbers - I think? They don't cling like ivy does but they grow up the wall and are about 8 feet tall. They both bloom on their new growth, rebloom throughout the summer (one much more than the other) and are very fragrant. I can hunt up a picture if it's any help....
Traditionally you prune shrub roses in the Spring and climbers in the Autumn.

We didn't do our climbers last Autumn. You should be fine doing them in the Spring. Tying them in horizontally is important too as the spurs that produce flowers grow up from these laterals.
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  #1547  
Old 18.01.2018, 16:21
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Thank you for the link. As Tom says, there are some local varieties which are totally winter resistant. We had some in our previous place, growing out of nooks and crannies and rock crevices. Some of them had just beautiful thick leaves and some of them would bloom gorgeous flowers in summer and hibernate entire winter. But, I can't really tell which one is which. I will keep them indoors just to be safe.
They're not actually local. As I said they're mountain or alpine plants and they really are fine outdoors. Most are hardy down to -20 and some much colder!
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  #1548  
Old 18.01.2018, 16:56
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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We didn't get our roses pruned back this fall. Can we do it in winter without hurting the plants? Early spring? Wait till they've bloomed again next summer?
As my Hoosier MIL, she of the greenest of thumbs, used to say:

"The best time to prune roses is when the shears are sharp."

And this from a woman who worked the garden with a trowel in one hand and a calendar in the other, roses were the exception to her rule that to everything there is a season. MIL practiced benign neglect on her roses; prune in the fall, prune in the spring, prune when she had a moment free, prune low, prune to 2 feet, deadhead rather than prune - no matter what she did the rose garden rewarded her with show-stopping glory, year after year.

I'll be pruning half my roses - old rose varieties, a present from MIL - this spring, hopefully before the new growth buds start out. Half, because that's the portion I just didn't get around to last fall. I don't have MIL's green thumb, and I don't have the glorious Hoosier sun - but my roses aren't half bad.

So don't stress, prune them when you have time - and when the shears are sharp.
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  #1549  
Old 18.01.2018, 17:32
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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"The best time to prune roses is when the shears are sharp."

... but my roses aren't half bad.
Ok, I have just deemed you "the local rose expert"

I have half a dozen small rose bushes that came with my garden. They don't look like they have been tended to very well, and some of them have been fighting for the sun through the weeds for a while.

At some point this winter (currently planned for early- to mid-February) I plan to dig them all up and move them to a better location. When I do this, I would also like to cut them back so that they handle the transplanting better, as well as to get them into better shape (literally and figuratively).

Do you have any suggestions on how to ensure the best possible outcome? I intend to fertilize the new locations when I drop in the rootball, but that's about as much as I know
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  #1550  
Old 18.01.2018, 17:49
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Ok, I have just deemed you "the local rose expert"
I'm afraid I am wholly undeserving of that title. From her posts, Odile is the real deal - she would be best to advise you on roses. And most gardening topics.

But my non-expert, uninformed, absolutely unencumbered by knowledge 5Rp:

If I don't like where something is in my garden, I don't stress too much over transplanting. Afterall, since I didn't like it in it's original spot, what do I have to lose if the transplant is unsuccessful? I just dig up the largest amount I can around the rootball, move it into a nicely prepared hole twice as big as it probably needs, and hope for the best.

That said, I've never tried to transplant any of my established roses. I figure they know better than I do what, and where, is best for them.
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  #1551  
Old 18.01.2018, 19:18
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Ok, I have just deemed you "the local rose expert"

I have half a dozen small rose bushes that came with my garden. They don't look like they have been tended to very well, and some of them have been fighting for the sun through the weeds for a while.

At some point this winter (currently planned for early- to mid-February) I plan to dig them all up and move them to a better location. When I do this, I would also like to cut them back so that they handle the transplanting better, as well as to get them into better shape (literally and figuratively).

Do you have any suggestions on how to ensure the best possible outcome? I intend to fertilize the new locations when I drop in the rootball, but that's about as much as I know
Roses are pretty much indestructible and can withstand almost anything. I took a whole load of them from our garden in Germany to our rented place in Belgium and then moved them all again to the house we bought there. They all survived and continued to bloom beautifully.

March would probably be the best time to move them if you can wait that long. I recommend giving them all a good hard prune before digging them up and then transferring them with a good sized root ball to the new location. Fertilise them and wait for them to provide you with a beautiful display in summer.


And for Mathnut and her climbers I would prune them in March as the others have said. I tend to prune all of mine in March as they are invariably still blooming in autumn.
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  #1552  
Old 18.01.2018, 19:24
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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March would probably be the best time to move them if you can wait that long.
Even better


The thing is, I'm not even very fond of roses. They were my Mother's favorite, and she had a garden devoted entirely to them. I'd probably give the ones I have away, but Dan likes them, so I will create a rose garden for him
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  #1553  
Old 09.02.2018, 13:48
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

Hey Gardners,
I have just moved into a new flat and I'm looking for inspiration to set up this spring a small balcony garden. Where do you usually get your garden inspiration from?
Thanks!
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  #1554  
Old 09.02.2018, 14:02
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Hey Gardners,
I have just moved into a new flat and I'm looking for inspiration to set up this spring a small balcony garden. Where do you usually get your garden inspiration from?
Thanks!
You could maybe start off by deciding what your garden should be like? Do you want to spend a lot of time on it or should it be easy maintenance? Do you just want a colection of as many plants as possible just because they take you fancy, or do you care more about the overall arrangement and visual. In the latter case, get out some paper and a pencil and do some sketches to see what might work for you. If you don't know where to start, plenty of examples online. Just ask Google.

Go to garden centres and google to find about different plants on offer. Don't just think about the now but think about what will happen when yourt stuff gets bigger. If one plant grows much faster than another, it may choke it.

The sky is the limit. There is so much you can do. So many interesting plants you can buy. Planning a garden is more about knowing what to leave out and when to stop than knowing what to put in.

Above all, have fun.
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  #1555  
Old 09.02.2018, 15:22
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

google, pictures and text, you won't be able to decide after 30 minutes

As to where I get plants: Landi, Coop garden-center, Obi while my neighbour gets them from the fancy, expensive, little shops around here.
We kind of share the little garden we have, you can't tell the difference
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  #1556  
Old 09.02.2018, 17:08
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Hey Gardners,
I have just moved into a new flat and I'm looking for inspiration to set up this spring a small balcony garden. Where do you usually get your garden inspiration from?
I used to get it from the grand gardens of the grand houses in the U.K. (more dreams than anything).

They don't have that kind of thing here so I use the internet.

Houzz is quite good to see what other people have done.
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Old 09.02.2018, 18:51
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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Houzz is quite good to see what other people have done.
Oh, that's a dangerous (nice) site!!
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  #1558  
Old 09.03.2018, 12:38
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

ok, I'm pushing the spring envelope!

I've planted onions, shallots, potatoes and lettuce in the garden. We'll see how they do with the (currently warm) weather and the impending rains to soak them in


Today I set some seeds into peat pots and put them on the kitchen table in their little greenhouse. Spring is coming, whether or not it wants to!
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  #1559  
Old 09.03.2018, 16:53
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

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I used to get it from the grand gardens of the grand houses in the U.K. (more dreams than anything).

They don't have that kind of thing here so I use the internet.

Houzz is quite good to see what other people have done.


Good old National Trust!


Château de Prangins in Prangins (near Nyon) is the closest you'll get to a NT property and shop and they do sell seeds sometimes (including from their wonderful medieval herbs garden)
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Old 09.03.2018, 17:18
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Re: How about a gardening thread?

Sigh. You're all having so much fun with your gardens. I am envious. All I still see is white, white, white.


And I'm secretly dreading the spring. Our "new" canine companion has had a whole winter of pooping outside - when the snow melts I'll be looking not at spring grass, but more likely at hundreds of doggie presents that have been so nicely hidden by layers of snow these past months.


Sigh.
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