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  #21  
Old 21.09.2015, 10:47
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

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Probably because the wiring is much better than in other countries?
Also, building-code regulations are stricter.
Just a little cent here:

Fire building-code regulations are in no way stricter in Switzerland than in other European countries. I had to study for months to be a par with the Portuguese regulations (and was still shaky for the exam). In Switzerland I pick up a dossier, check the item, do an approximation and hope for the best. Also, since the last update from this year, it has all gone tits up and even the people in the City Chamber have yet no idea what to go with in regular apartment buildings up to 30 meters. Yes, no matter how unbelievable you might find it, construction regulations in Switzerland are, in some topics (such as fire safety and handicap accessibility) miles behind other countries.

The reason why there is no smoke or other fire detectors in regular apartment buildings in Switzerland is due to the Brandschutzrichtlinie - Brandmeldeanlagen

Basically: you only need to do it if you want to. Which translates in client vernacular to: "Oh! Lookie! I can spare money if I skip this!"

Bigger buildings, public buildings and industrial buildings are a whole other topic, though. However, staircases and lifts must be equipped with detectors and ventilation systems because these are flight ways.

But before you panic, though there are no smoke detectors, we still need to plan apartment buildings in a way that fire cannot propagate to other apartments (vertically or horizontally) - so the chance of the fire catching into your neighbor's rooms is quite reduced. It's not the jungle, but it does have room for improvement.
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  #22  
Old 21.09.2015, 11:10
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

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edited... So all the oil that was in the pan burned and we had really huge fire in the kitchen. Luckily, my husband woke up, took a fire extinguisher and finished the fire....
If you seek advice, you might find that a fire blanket is the best tool for an oil fire in the kitchen.

The problem with extinguishers is the force of the liquid or powder can force the burning oil out of the pan onto the work surface, and now you have a much bigger fire with plastics burning and giving off poisonous fumes.

On your next trip to IKEA, buy some smoke detectors, a fire blanket, and maybe a dry powder fire extinguisher.

For good security always lock your front door, but leave the key in the lock, so if there is a fire you can get out quickly. Pull the key half way out of the lock, and your partner can still unlock the door from outside the apartment.
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  #23  
Old 21.09.2015, 11:23
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

We've used a fire blanket twice in the last year - but outside on the terrace when our stupidly-designed BBQ caught alight.

It was a Camping Gaz one and the action of lifting the lid positions the 'keep food warm rack' over the side burner and so fat drips down and catches alight which causes any fat at the bottom to catch alight too.

Putting the lid back down doesn't stop the flames and black acrid smoke because of thew air holes in the lid and a damp towel is useless too as it will cause the glass viewing window in the BBQ's lid to shatter into a thousand pieces of glass (we did that three years ago!)
So, a fire blanket is the only safe way to put the fire out.

Anyway, after the last fire we got rid of it and got a better and safer BBQ.

One advantage of a fire blanket over a damp towel is that it's less of a conductor of heat so you get more protection when you're in the process of using it.
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  #24  
Old 21.09.2015, 11:29
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

An easy tip that MIGHT save the kitchen: Have a large metal lid handy when cooking. Slamming that on a fire might help extinguish it or keep it at bay until you can get the extinguisher/fire blanket. But no guarantees!!! Best is always to have a large extinguisher (which you know how to use) handy and to contact the fire department as quickly as possible.

A reminder that fire departments, paramedics and police need you to keep bulky items out of the way in stairwells so that they can help as quickly as possible, and so that you can get out of the house immediately in case of fire (never use an elevator!)
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  #25  
Old 21.09.2015, 11:53
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

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A reminder that fire departments, paramedics and police need you to keep bulky items out of the way in stairwells so that they can help as quickly as possible, and so that you can get out of the house immediately in case of fire (never use an elevator!)
Actually, nothing should be kept in the staircases. No furniture. No shoe racks. No shoes. No wardrobes/tables/chairs (yep, I had an Italian family living under me that made a living room out of their staircase platform to the point I could not pass with my hands full of shopping bags). Not even a stander for umbrellas. No baby cars (there should be a proper storage space for those somewhere in the building). Even paintings should be avoided, since they might be a fire hazard.

I try to explain this to many, but they just stare at me with anger in their eyes: "what's the problem with my shoes outside???? It's MY platform!"

When people start falling down the stairs and breaking necks during a fire emergency with no visibility and the liability bill comes along, I hope they remember my advice...
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Old 21.09.2015, 12:05
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

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Actually, nothing should be kept in the staircases. No furniture. No shoe racks. No shoes. No wardrobes/tables/chairs (yep, I had an Italian family living under me that made a living room out of their staircase platform to the point I could not pass with my hands full of shopping bags). Not even a stander for umbrellas. No baby cars (there should be a proper storage space for those somewhere in the building). Even paintings should be avoided, since they might be a fire hazard.

I try to explain this to many, but they just stare at me with anger in their eyes: "what's the problem with my shoes outside???? It's MY platform!"

When people start falling down the stairs and breaking necks during a fire emergency with no visibility and the liability bill comes along, I hope they remember my advice...
I was hinting at the fact that everything is too bulky for a stairwell, but probably that was lost in translation.
Entertaining thread on the subject: Can they kick us out because we refuse to bring always the buggy in the basement?
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Old 21.09.2015, 12:19
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

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Probably because the wiring is much better than in other countries?
Also, building-code regulations are stricter.

People who have their own houses often have them, though (often gets you a discount from your insurance).

Fires like OPs are very dangerous and I'm glad an extinguisher was at hand.
:cough:

Ok, let's see how often Swiss wiring is to code. Let's open up some boxes... Oh wait, you don't use electrical boxes. Ok, let's take the plug off the wall and you tell me which wire colour is ground and which is live, according to the code. Then test it with your tongue.
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  #28  
Old 21.09.2015, 12:29
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

Awwww... It makes me proud to read all the rule conforming answers!!!! I confess, sometimes even I go against some rules (I sometimes do some emergency vacuum cleaning on Sundays!!!! *GASP* I know I know...), but safety is safety! You shouldn't play with fire

(Sometimes I fear I sound like the weird "prevent forrest fires" bear... sorry about that...)
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  #29  
Old 21.09.2015, 13:02
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Re: Fire in the kitchen!

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Probably because the wiring is much better than in other countries?
Also, building-code regulations are stricter.

People who have their own houses often have them, though (often gets you a discount from your insurance).

Fires like OPs are very dangerous and I'm glad an extinguisher was at hand.
Haha, seen some very dodgy wiring in old Swiss apartments in both Basel & Geneva, 6 amps total available. Both rental apartments not modernised in the last 40 years. I saw a flat with no bathroom in Basel & another with a shower in the kitchen. Toilet in both cases was on the staircase with 1 toilet for each apartment.

Not all Swiss are wealthy, finding a dump to film in is very easy indeed!
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