Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Housing in general  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03.01.2018, 16:01
krlock3's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,044
Groaned at 46 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,297 Times in 1,103 Posts
krlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond repute
Plastering the cellar.

Hi there,

Question for the Swiss DIY experts please?

Our home has a small cellar which I would like to replaster and then put shelving up in. I own the property so it's not a question of asking permission.

On one side of the cellar, it is massive concrete. On the other, it is something rather thinner (about 30cm maybe).

I've attached a picture of the thinner wall, but they all look rather similar.

My plan is

1. Remove all items from cellar
2. Wash it down, especially the floor
3. Repair all the drilled holes, using filler
4. Replaster the walls, probably leave the ceiling as it is.
5. Wait six weeks for it to properly dry
6. Repaint
6. Measure out and install some custom shelving.

My questions....

a) I've never replasted anything, can I just replaster as normal, even with those deeper ruts? Basically following a youtube video like this.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyngzAYIuZs&t=378s

It does not need to look perfect, just more presentable.

b) If I fill the drilled holes with some kind of standard filler, will it be ok to redrill into when it comes to putting up the shelving?

c) On the other side of the thin wall, I have some tiling which I would definitely prefer not to drill through. Is there some guide to how deep you can drill into a wall without causing a hole on the other side? If it's an issue, I can keep the shelving to the other side, which is definitely thicker.

Ok, picture is below, and thanks for any tips....

Name:  IMG_3038v4.jpg
Views: 780
Size:  68.9 KB
__________________
krlock3.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03.01.2018, 16:12
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 15,361
Groaned at 499 Times in 399 Posts
Thanked 22,297 Times in 9,056 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

I know someone in the U.K. who built their own house. They did everything (and I mean everything) themselves, except the plastering. It's messy and the people that do it for a living make it look easy but it's not - it needs lots of practice.

It's really messy too.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Tom1234 for this useful post:
  #3  
Old 03.01.2018, 16:43
JagWaugh's Avatar
RIP
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eglisau
Posts: 7,272
Groaned at 47 Times in 46 Posts
Thanked 14,131 Times in 5,506 Posts
JagWaugh has a reputation beyond reputeJagWaugh has a reputation beyond reputeJagWaugh has a reputation beyond reputeJagWaugh has a reputation beyond reputeJagWaugh has a reputation beyond reputeJagWaugh has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Quote:
View Post
I know someone in the U.K. who built their own house. They did everything (and I mean everything) themselves, except the plastering. It's messy and the people that do it for a living make it look easy but it's not - it needs lots of practice.

It's really messy too.
Couldn't agree more. I'll tackle a patch, or even a wall. But every time I've tried a ceiling I've ended up with half the plaster on myself or the floor, and a ceiling that only a very forgiving eye would call "rustic".
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank JagWaugh for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 03.01.2018, 16:51
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Plastering the cellar.

I think it is important for moisture to transfer in and out of those cellars. I would be careful of plastering it with a material that might trap in the moisture, as a moisture barrier.

There is a material called "Haftputz", which is a very pourous material that allows plaster to bond well. That material by itself is ideal for cellars, although it should not be painted or treated any further.

I did one area with only haftputz, and it absorbs moisture remarkably well. The problem with moisture is it encourages mold.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #5  
Old 03.01.2018, 17:22
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Eschenbach SG
Posts: 15
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 10 Times in 6 Posts
anneedmonds has no particular reputation at present
Re: Plastering the cellar.

I had a plasterer come over from the UK to plaster my whole house last year. He will be coming in the spring to finish off and do some outside work. If you post me direct I can give you his details. Everything is legal with the Swiss and above board.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank anneedmonds for this useful post:
  #6  
Old 03.01.2018, 17:39
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Tessin
Posts: 6,287
Groaned at 124 Times in 91 Posts
Thanked 7,469 Times in 3,511 Posts
Mrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Are any of the walls outside walls?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03.01.2018, 19:34
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: uster
Posts: 49
Groaned at 15 Times in 10 Posts
Thanked 122 Times in 39 Posts
english fella has earned some respectenglish fella has earned some respect
Re: Plastering the cellar.

i have p.m to you, p.m to avoid silly remarks on what i have to say, good luck
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank english fella for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:01
Ato Ato is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: ZH
Posts: 1,213
Groaned at 14 Times in 14 Posts
Thanked 2,152 Times in 898 Posts
Ato has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Morning,

Not an expert by any means but I've spent plenty of time labouring on plasterers during summers. There is a knack to it though (the plastering as opposed to labouring).

2- I'd recommend a drop sheet as opposed to a clean floor.

3- Drilled holes will be filled by the skim anyways, I wouldn't bother repairing them.

a) The deeper ruts won't be the problem, it's the painted surface that will need to be scratched/scored up for the plaster to stick. (Or in the video they use a coating, scratching back to raw concrete works just as well)

b) They'll drill out fine, but I wouldn't expect them to hold as well as a rawl plug in concrete.

c) Is this thin wall 30cm? I wouldn't worry about the depth, I'd worry about the vibration cracking the old tile mortar and them falling off. In honesty I would'nt worry at all.

Another simpler option would be to place a lath frame against the wall and plasterboard over it. Very neat and you can drill the shelves into the laths.
Reply With Quote
The following 6 users would like to thank Ato for this useful post:
  #9  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:12
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Tessin
Posts: 6,287
Groaned at 124 Times in 91 Posts
Thanked 7,469 Times in 3,511 Posts
Mrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

We have had success finding local tradespeople through an ad on Renovera. Those who reply are keen to work and you are able to ask for references. As they are local and legal this is, in my opinion, a big advantage.

If you do not have a window in the cellar you need to consider how humid it will get while you plaster. Personally I am not sure that's the way to go. We converted what was a natural cellar but incorrectly built and decided against plaster after seeing alternative solutions from the painter who is also a plasterer.

As for the shelving, you can buy heavy duty freestanding units which do not need to be drilled into the wall. Some people opt for inexpensive cupboards so their clutter is hidden.
__________________

Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Mrs. Doolittle for this useful post:
  #10  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:16
AbFab's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 8,073
Groaned at 344 Times in 234 Posts
Thanked 11,543 Times in 3,981 Posts
AbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

I don't understand why you want to plaster your cellars walls.

Unless you want it as a living area, in which case you will have a problem heating the cellar, why not leave it as brick and concrete??
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank AbFab for this useful post:
  #11  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:17
robBob's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Zurich
Posts: 2,574
Groaned at 49 Times in 36 Posts
Thanked 2,373 Times in 1,279 Posts
robBob has a reputation beyond reputerobBob has a reputation beyond reputerobBob has a reputation beyond reputerobBob has a reputation beyond reputerobBob has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Why not do wood paneling?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank robBob for this useful post:
  #12  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:17
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Plastering the cellar.

I've had success finding people through online portals. But you still need to be clear about what you want, and should supervise the work.

I asked 4 different people for estimates and approach for a particular project, and each one had a different approach and price range. I think you will find this to be true with just about any project. There is more than one right way to get a job done, apparently.

You can even just fill in the holes with a tube of toothpaste, and call it done.

Last edited by Phos; 04.01.2018 at 10:35.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank for this useful post:
  #13  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:34
krlock3's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,044
Groaned at 46 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,297 Times in 1,103 Posts
krlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Many thanks for all the replies...

I didn't realise it was such a complicated topic!!!!!

I'll try to answer questions in no particular order:

* Finding tradespeople? No, I'm not looking for tradespeople to do it. If I do it I'd like to have a go myself, to learn a bit and save money. Since I'm still between jobs, I have the time and I need to be money conscious.

* Why plaster at all? At the moment there is no shelving on the wall, just standalone shelves. I thought about putting shelving in. In that case there are plenty of holes from previous owners, so I would have to repair those, and at the same time, I thought, the surface is pretty rough, so why not plaster it out? I know it's just a cellar but if I want to freshen it up, I figured plastering would be the way to go.

Compared to how it looks now, I imagine, with nice flatter surfaces, a fresh coat of paint, and custom shelving, it will simply look much nicer and will also be more practical for storage. No?

* Moisture concerns? Good point, but my cellar is actually on the ground floor, next to the ground floor washroom. I don't see moisture being too much of a problem in that case?

* Mrs Doolittle. Yes, one wall is an outside wall, in that on the other side of the wall is the back garden. May I ask why this matters?

* Difficulty of plastering. Yes, I agree it looks easy on the video and might be difficult in real life but I honestly don't think it can look much worse than it does now! You may be right about the ceiling though. I'm tempted to leave that and just do the walls.

* Technique: EnglishFella sent me a pm with some great tips. He mentions, use grundierung, then something called quarzdruck, and to use renovierung putz and NOT plaster. Anyone second that?
__________________
krlock3.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:39
krlock3's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,044
Groaned at 46 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,297 Times in 1,103 Posts
krlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Quote:
View Post
Why not do wood paneling?
Haha, we spent a fortune taking all the wood panelling OUT of the house when we did our refurb... not about to put any back in!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04.01.2018, 10:56
Ato Ato is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: ZH
Posts: 1,213
Groaned at 14 Times in 14 Posts
Thanked 2,152 Times in 898 Posts
Ato has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond reputeAto has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Quote:
View Post


* Technique: EnglishFella sent me a pm with some great tips. He mentions, use grundierung, then something called quarzdruck, and to use renovierung putz and NOT plaster. Anyone second that?
I'm not aware of the German terms, but seeing as he's being working here I'd take his word for it.

Grundierung looks like the coarse paint on primer, I'm sure there are many types but google can only get me so far.
Renovierung putz looks like bonding (coarse sticky base layer) or some form of multitex (one coat premixed). When I hear plaster I hear skim coat (white/pink top coat), skim goes on top of bonding, mortar, or a well scored surface. But I don't know the german for these things.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04.01.2018, 11:00
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 15,361
Groaned at 499 Times in 399 Posts
Thanked 22,297 Times in 9,056 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Quote:
View Post
* Technique: EnglishFella sent me a pm with some great tips. He mentions, use grundierung, then something called quarzdruck, and to use renovierung putz and NOT plaster. Anyone second that?
Not sure why he didn't post it. It would be great to hear his reasoning and an description in English of the materials he recommends
.

I want to do something with our wine cellar. It's is pretty ugly so renovation tips are always good to read.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04.01.2018, 11:14
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,072
Groaned at 240 Times in 203 Posts
Thanked 23,248 Times in 9,883 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

You can buy a wide variety of shelf systems at just about any DIY shop. From ultra cheap fixed level shelves to more costly adjustable shelves. You can get systems that stand on the floor, systems that suspend or cantilever from the wall, anything.

And of course you can just buy the wood and make your own. Actually on my first ever cellar shelf project I was so skint that I couldn't even afford to buy any planks so I scrounged discarded pallets from a builder's skip. I broke those up using a hammer and crowbar, extracted the nails, and then planed and sanded the planks by hand. You only do that when time is no issue.

I've done all of those variants. They all have their pros and cons.

Personally I like the cast concrete texture that Swiss basements have. It gives them that utilitarian basementy feeling. Old drill holes can easily be repaired by different methods as others have explained, depending on your budget and level of professionalism.

I don't really see any need to plaster to be able to add shelves. Even if the wall is bumpy and uneven, there are shelf systems that can deal with that.

But if you see this as a project, and as an opportunity to gain a new skill and learn plastering, by all means do it.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04.01.2018, 11:24
krlock3's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 3,044
Groaned at 46 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,297 Times in 1,103 Posts
krlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond reputekrlock3 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

What is the best product / method here to repair the holes then, if I simply did that as a first step, before deciding about the full plastering?
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04.01.2018, 11:28
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Quote:
View Post
What is the best product / method here to repair the holes then, if I simply did that as a first step, before deciding about the full plastering?
White Toothpaste, seriously. Or you can also get Moltofil Reparaturspachtel in a tube or powder.

https://www.bauundhobby.ch/bauen-+-r...3227625-300/de
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #20  
Old 04.01.2018, 11:30
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,072
Groaned at 240 Times in 203 Posts
Thanked 23,248 Times in 9,883 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Plastering the cellar.

Quote:
View Post
What is the best product / method here to repair the holes then, if I simply did that as a first step, before deciding about the full plastering?
Go to your local DIY store and look what they have.

A professional builder might actually mix a tiny batch of concrete and repair with the original material.

But you can buy tubes of ready to use filling mixtures in DIY shops that once set, are tough enough to drill into again.

The Moltofil that Phos recommends does a good job.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank amogles for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cellar Renovation - What is the definition of Wohnzimmer Roark Housing in general 2 02.08.2016 15:13
Plastering a wall ...... question. smoky Housing in general 10 20.05.2013 21:54
Pump in the cellar buzzing? Karl Daily life 4 28.04.2013 17:40


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:48.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0